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English (X) Literature & drama (X)

       
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The Phantom Rickshaw and Other Ghost Stories

By: Rudyard Kipling

Excerpt: The Phantom ?Rickshaw and Other Ghost Stories by Rudyard Kipling.

Contents THE PHANTOM ?RICKSHAW ...................................................................................................... 4 MY OWN TRUE GHOST STORY................................................................................................ 25 THE STRANGE RIDE OF MORROWBIE JUKES ................................................................... 33 THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING........................................................................................... 54 ?THE FINEST STORY IN THE WORLD? ................................................................................. 87...

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The Tragedie of Romeo and Juliet

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Romeo and Juliet; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Sampson and Gregory, with Swords and Bucklers, of the House of Capulet. Sampson. Gregory: A my word wee?l not carry coales. Greg. No, for then we should be Colliars. Samp. I mean, if we be in choller, wee?l draw. Greg. I, While you live, draw your necke out o?th Collar. Samp. I strike quickly, being mov?d. Greg. But thou art not quickly mov?d to strike. Samp. A dog of the house of Mountague, moves me. Greg. To move, is to stir: and to be valiant, is to stand: Therefore, if thou art mov?d, thou runst away. Samp. A dogge of that house shall move me to stand. I will take the wall of any Man or Maid of Mountagues. Greg. That shewes thee a weake slave, for the wea-kest goes to the wall. Samp. True, and therefore women being the weaker Vessels, are ever thrust to the wall: therefore I will push Mountagues men from the wall, and thrust his Maides to the wall. Greg. The Quarrell is betweene our Masters, and us |(their men. Samp. ?Tis all one, I will shew my selfe a tyrant: when I have fought with the men, I will bee civill with the Maids, and cut off their head...

Table of Contents: The Tragedie of Romeo and Juliet, 1 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 1

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The Marble Faun : Or, The Romance of Monte Beni, Illustrated with Photogravures

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

Excerpt: The tower among the Apennines It was in June that the sculptor, Kenyon, arrived on horse back at the gate of an ancient country house (which, from some of its features, might almost be called a castle) situated in a part of Tuscany somewhat remote from the ordinary track of tourists. Thither we must now accompany him, and endeavor to make our story flow onward, like a streamlet, past a gray tower that rises on the hillside, overlooking a spacious valley, which is set in the grand framework of the Apennines....

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Honorine

By: Honoré de Balzac

Excerpt: If the French have as great an aversion for traveling as the English have a propensity for it, both English and French have perhaps sufficient reasons. Something better than England is everywhere to be found; whereas it is excessively difficult to find the charms of France outside France. Other countries can show admirable scenery, and they frequently offer greater comfort than that of France, which makes but slow progress in that particular. They sometimes display a bewildering magnificence, grandeur, and luxury; they lack neither grace nor noble manners; but the life of the brain, the talent for conversation, the ?Attic salt? so familiar at Paris, the prompt apprehension of what one is thinking, but does not say, the spirit of the unspoken, which is half the French language, is nowhere else to be met with. Hence a Frenchman, whose raillery, as it is, finds so little comprehension, would wither in a foreign land like an uprooted tree....

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Floor Games

By: H. G. Wells

Excerpt: The Toys to Have. The jolliest indoor games for boys and girls demand a floor, and the home that has no floor upon which games may be played falls so far short of happiness. It must be a floor covered with linoleum or cork carpet, so that toy soldiers and such-like will stand up upon it, and of a color and surface that will take and show chalk marks; the common green colored cork carpet without a pattern is the best of all. It must be no highway to other rooms, and well lit and airy. Occasionally, alas! it must be scrubbed--and then a truce to Floor Games....

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The Third Part of Henry the Sixth

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Third Part of Henry the Sixth with the Death of the Duke of Yorke; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Alarum. Enter Plantagenet, Edward, Richard, Norfolke, Mount-ague, Warwicke, and Souldiers. Warwicke. I Wonder how the King escap?d our hands? Pl. While we pursu?d the Horsmen of y North, He slyly stole away, and left his men: Whereat the great Lord of Northumberland, Whose Warlike eares could never brooke retreat, Chear?d up the drouping Army, and himselfe. Lord Clifford and Lord Stafford all abrest Charg?d our maine Battailes Front: and breaking in, Were by the Swords of common Souldiers slaine. Edw. Lord Staffords Father, Duke of Buckingham, Is either slaine or wounded dangerous. I cleft his Beauer with a down- right blow: That this is true (Father) behold his blood. Mount. And Brother, here?s the Earle of Wiltshires |(blood, Whom I encountred as the Battels joyn?d. Rich. Speake thou for me, and tell them what I did. Plan. Richard hath best deseru?d of all my sonnes: But is your Grace dead, my Lord of Somerset? Nor. Such hope have all the line of John of Gaunt. Rich. Thus do I hope to shake King Henries head. Warw. And s...

Table of Contents: The third Part of Henry the Sixt, 2 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 2

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The Poems

By: George Meredith

Excerpt: The Poems of George Meredith by George Meredith.

Contents CHILLIANWALLAH..................................................................................................................... 14 THE DOE: A FRAGMENT........................................................................................................... 15 BEAUTY ROHTRAUT .................................................................................................................. 19 THE OLIVE BRANCH .................................................................................................................. 20 SONG .............................................................................................................................................. 23 THE WILD ROSE AND THE SNOWDROP ............................................................................. 24 THE DEATH OF WINTER .......................................................................................................... 25 SONG .............................................................................................................................................. 26 JOHN LACKLAND ....................................................

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Maggie: A Girl of the Streets

By: Stephen Crane

Excerpt: Chapter 1. A very little boy stood upon a heap of gravel for the honor of Rum Alley. He was throwing stones at howling urchins from Devil?s Row who were circling madly about the heap and pelting at him. His infantile countenance was livid with fury. His small body was writhing in the delivery of great, crimson oaths. ?Run, Jimmie, run! Dey?ll get yehs,? screamed a retreating Rum Alley child. ?Naw,? responded Jimmie with a valiant roar, ?dese micks can?t make me run.?...

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Ten Years Later

By: Alexandre Dumas

Excerpt: Towards the middle of the month of May, in the year 1660, at nine o?clock in the morning, when the sun, already high in the heavens, was fast absorbing the dew from the ramparts of the castle of Blois a little cavalcade, composed of three men and two pages, re-entered the city by the bridge, without producing any other effect upon the passengers of the quay beyond a first movement of the hand to the head, as a salute, and a second movement of the tongue to express, in the purest French then spoken in France: ?There is Monsieur returning from hunting.? And that was all....

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The Life of John Sterling

By: Thomas Carlyle

Introduction: Near seven years ago, a short while before his death in 1844, John Sterling committed the care of his literary Character and printed Writings to two friends, Archdeacon Hare and myself. His estimate of the bequest was far from overweening; to few men could the small sum-total of his activities in this world seem more inconsiderable than, in those last solemn days, it did to him. He had burnt much; found much unworthy; looking steadfastly into the silent continents of Death and Eternity, a brave man?s judgments about his own sorry work in the field of Time are not apt to be too lenient. But, in fine, here was some portion of his work which the world had already got hold of, and which he could not burn. This too, since it was not to be abolished and annihilated, but must still for some time live and act, he wished to be wisely settled, as the rest had been. And so it was left in charge to us, the survivors, to do for it what we judged fittest, if indeed doing nothing did not seem the fittest to us. This message, communicated after his decease, was naturally a sacred one to Mr. Hare and me....

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An Essay on Criticism

By: Pope, Alexander, 1688-1744

Excerpt: ?Tis hard to say, if greater Want of Skill Appear in Writing or in Judging ill, But, of the two, less dang?rous is th? Offence, To tire our Patience, than mis-lead our Sense: Some few in that, but Numbers err in this, Ten Censure wrong for one who Writes amiss; A Fool might once himself alone expose, Now One in Verse makes many more in Prose....

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The French Revolution a History Volume Two

By: Thomas Carlyle

Excerpt: The French Revolution. A History (Volume Two).

Contents VOLUME II.?THE CONSTITUTION ...................................................................................................................... 6 BOOK 2.I. THE FEAST OF PIKES ............................................................................................................................. 6 Chapter 2.1.I. In the Tuileries. ..................................................................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2.1.II. In the Salle de Manege. ..................................................................................................................... 10 Chapter 2.1.III. The Muster....................................................................................................................................... 21 Chapter 2.1.IV. Journalism. ........................................................................................................................................ 27 Chapter 2.1.V. Clubbism. ............................................................................................................................................ 31 Ch...

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Lady Susan

By: Jane Austen

Excerpt: Lady Susan Vernon to Mr. Vernon. My Dear Brother,--I can no longer refuse myself the pleasure of profiting by your kind invitation when we last parted of spending some weeks with you at Churchhill, and, therefore, if quite convenient to you and Mrs. Vernon to receive me at present, I shall hope within a few days to be introduced to a sister whom I have so long desired to be acquainted with. My kind friends here are most affectionately urgent with me to prolong my stay, but their hospitable and cheerful dispositions lead them too much into society for my present situation and state of mind; and I impatiently look forward to the hour when I shall be admitted into Your delightful retirement....

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The Two Sides of the Shield

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

Preface: It is sometimes treated as an impertinence to revive the personages of one story in another, even though it is after the example of Shakespeare, who revived Falstaff, after his death, at the behest of Queen Elizabeth. This precedent is, however, a true impertinence in calling on the very great to justify the very small!...

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One of Our Conquerors

By: George Meredith

Excerpt: One of Our Conquerors by George Meredith.

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Frankenstein or the Modern Prometheus

By: Mary Wollstonecraft

Excerpt: You will rejoice to hear that no disaster has accompanied the commencement of an enterprise which you have regarded with such evil forebodings. I arrived here yesterday, and my first task is to assure my dear sister of my welfare and increasing confidence in the success of my undertaking....

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The Pathfinder

By: James Fenimore Cooper

Excerpt: The Pathfinder by James Fenimore Cooper.

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Edingburgh Picturesque Notes

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

Excerpt: The ancient and famous metropolis of the North sits overlooking a windy estuary from the slope and summit of three hills. No situation could be more commanding for the head city of a kingdom; none better chosen for noble prospects. From her tall precipice and terraced gardens she looks far and wide on the sea and broad champaigns. To the east you may catch at sunset the spark of the May lighthouse, where the Firth expands into the German Ocean; and away to the west, over all the carse of Stirling, you can see the first snows upon Ben Ledi....

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Le Morte Darthur

By: Thomas Malory

Excerpt: Chapter 1. How Queen Guenever rode a-Maying with certain knights of the Round Table and clad all in green. So it befell in the month of May, Queen Guenever called unto her knights of the Table Round; and she gave them warning that early upon the morrow she would ride a-Maying into woods and fields beside Westminster. And I warn you that there be none of you but that he be well horsed, and that ye all be clothed in green, outher in silk outher in cloth; and I shall bring with me ten ladies, and every knight shall have a lady behind him, and every knight shall have a squire and two yeomen; and I will that ye all be well horsed....

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The Millers Daughter

By: Emile Zola

Excerpt: Chapter 1. The Betrothal. Pere Merlier?s Mill, one beautiful summer evening, was arranged for a grand fete. In the courtyard were three tables, placed end to end, which awaited the guests. Everyone knew that Francoise, Merlier?s daughter, was that night to be betrothed to Dominique, a young man who was accused of idleness but whom the fair sex for three leagues around gazed at with sparkling eyes, such a fine appearance had he....

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