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Elegies

By: John Donne

Excerpt: JEALOSIE; FOND woman, which would?st have thy husband die, And yet complain?st of his great jealosie; If swolne with poyson, hee Jay in?his last bed, His body with a sere-barke covered, Drawing his breath, as thick and short, as can The nimblest crocheting Musitian, Ready with loathsome vomiting to spue His Soule out of one hell, into a new, Made deafe with his poore kindreds howling cries, Begging with few feign?d teares, great legacies, Thou would?st not weepe, but jolly,?and frolicke bee, As a slave, which to morrow should be free; Yet weep?st thou, when thou seest him hungerly Swallow his owne death, hearts-bane jealousies O give him many thanks, he?is courteous, That in suspecting kindly warneth us. Wee must not, as wee us?d, flout openly, In scoffing ridles, his deformitie; Nor at his boord together being satt, With words, nor touch, scarce lookes adulterate. Nor when he swolne, and pamper?d with great fare Sits downe, and snorts, cag?d in his basket chaire, Must wee usurpe his owne bed any more, Nor kisse and play in his house, as before. Now I see many dangers; for that is His realme, his castle, and his diocesse. B...

Table of Contents: JEALOSIE, 1 -- THE ANAGRAM, 2 -- CHANGE, 4 -- THE PERFUME, 5 -- HIS PICTURE, 7 -- OH, LET MEE NOT SERVE, 8 -- NATURES LAY IDEOT, 10 -- THE COMPARISON, 11 -- THE AUTUMNALL, 13 -- THE DREAME, 15 -- THE BRACELET, 16 -- HIS PARTING FROM HER, 19 -- JULIA, 22 -- A TALE OF A CITIZEN AND HIS WIFE, 23 -- THE EXPOSTULATION, 25 -- ON HIS MISTRIS, 27 -- VARIETY, 29 -- LOVES PROGRESS, 31 -- TO HIS MISTRIS GOING TO BED, 34 -- LOVES WARR, 36...

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The Tragedie of Romeo and Juliet

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Romeo and Juliet; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Sampson and Gregory, with Swords and Bucklers, of the House of Capulet. Sampson. Gregory: A my word wee?l not carry coales. Greg. No, for then we should be Colliars. Samp. I mean, if we be in choller, wee?l draw. Greg. I, While you live, draw your necke out o?th Collar. Samp. I strike quickly, being mov?d. Greg. But thou art not quickly mov?d to strike. Samp. A dog of the house of Mountague, moves me. Greg. To move, is to stir: and to be valiant, is to stand: Therefore, if thou art mov?d, thou runst away. Samp. A dogge of that house shall move me to stand. I will take the wall of any Man or Maid of Mountagues. Greg. That shewes thee a weake slave, for the wea-kest goes to the wall. Samp. True, and therefore women being the weaker Vessels, are ever thrust to the wall: therefore I will push Mountagues men from the wall, and thrust his Maides to the wall. Greg. The Quarrell is betweene our Masters, and us |(their men. Samp. ?Tis all one, I will shew my selfe a tyrant: when I have fought with the men, I will bee civill with the Maids, and cut off their head...

Table of Contents: The Tragedie of Romeo and Juliet, 1 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 1

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The Chimes

By: Charles Dickens

Excerpt: FIRST QUARTER; THERE are not many people --and as it is desirable that a story-teller and a story-reader should establish a mutual understanding as soon as possible, I beg it to be noticed that I confine this observation neither to young people nor to little people, but extend it to all conditions of people: little and big, young and old: yet growing up, or already growing down again --there are not, I say, many people who would care to sleep in a church. I don?t mean at sermon-time in warm weather (when the thing has actually been done, once or twice), but in the night, and alone. A great multitude of persons will be violently astonished, I know, by this position, in the broad bold Day. But it applies to Night. It must be argued by night, and I will undertake to maintain it successfully on any gusty winter?s night appointed for the purpose, with any one opponent chosen from the rest, who will meet me singly in an old church-yard, before an old church-door; and will previously empower me to lock him in, if needful to his satisfaction, until morning ......

Table of Contents: ILLUSTRATION: TROTTY VECK., ii -- FIRST QUARTER, 1 -- THE SECOND QUARTER, 20 -- THIRD QUARTER, 36 -- FOURTH QUARTER, 52 -- ILLUSTRATION: MR. AND MRS. TUGBY., 68...

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The Bostonians

By: Henry James

Excerpt: Chapter 1; Olive will come down in about ten minutes; she told me to tell you that. About ten; that is exactly like Olive. Neither five nor fifteen, and yet not ten exactly, but either nine or eleven. She didn?t tell me to say she was glad to see you, because she doesn?t know whether she is or not, and she wouldn?t for the world expose herself to telling a fib. She is very honest, is Olive Chancellor; she is full of rectitude. Nobody tells fibs in Boston; I don?t know what to make of them all. Well, I am very glad to see you, at any rate.? These words were spoken with much volubility by a fair, plump, smiling woman who entered a narrow drawing-room in which a visitor, kept waiting for a few moments, was already absorbed in a book. The gentleman had not even needed to sit down to become interested: apparently he had taken up the volume from a table as soon as he came in, and, standing there, after a single glance round the apartment, had lost himself in its pages. He threw it down at the approach of Mrs. Luna, laughed, shook hands with her, and said in answer to her last remark, ?You imply that you do tell fibs. Perhaps that...

Table of Contents: Book First 3 -- Chapter 1, 3 -- Chapter 2, 8 -- Chapter 3, 12 -- Chapter 4, 20 -- Chapter 5, 26 -- Chapter 6, 30 -- Chapter 7, 38 -- Chapter 8, 45 -- Chapter 9, 51 -- Chapter 10, 55 -- Chapter 11, 62 -- Chapter 12, 69 -- Chapter 13, 77 -- Chapter 14, 83 -- Chapter 15, 89 -- Chapter 16, 96 -- Chapter 17, 106 -- Chapter 18, 114 -- Chapter 19, 124 -- Chapter 20, 131 -- Book Second 145 -- Chapter 21, 145 -- Chapter 22, 153 -- Chapter 23, 163 -- Chapter 24, 173...

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Paradise Regained

By: John Milton

Excerpt: THE FIRST BOOK; Who e?re while the happy Garden sung, By one mans disobedience lost, now sing Recover?d Paradise to all mankind, By one mans firm obedience fully tri?d Through all temptation, and the Tempter foil?d In all his wiles, defeated and repuls?t, And Eden rais?d in the wast Wilderness. Thou Spirit who ledst this glorious Eremite Into the Desert, his Victorious Field Against the Spiritual Foe, and broughtst him thence By proof the undoubted Son of God, inspire, As thou art wont, my prompted Song else mute, And bear through highth or depth of natures bounds With prosperous wing full summ?d to tell of deeds Above Heroic, though in secret done, And unrecorded left through many an Age, Worthy t?have not remain?d so long unsung. Now had the great Proclaimer with a voice More awful then the sound of Trumpet, cri?d Repentance, and Heavens Kingdom nigh at hand To all Baptiz?d: to his great Baptism flock?d With aw the Regions round, and with them came From Nazareth the Son of Joseph deem?d To the flood Jordan, came as then obscure, Unmarkt, unknown; but him the Baptist soon Descri?d, divinely warn?d, and witness bore As to h...

Table of Contents: THE FIRST BOOK., 1 -- PARADISE REGAIN?D. The Second BOOK., 13 -- PARADISE REGAIN?D. The Third BOOK., 24 -- PARADISE REGAIN?D. The Fourth BOOK., 34 -- Notes, 49...

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Holy Sonnets

By: John Donne

Excerpt: Holy Sonnets; I THOU hast made me, And shall thy worke decay? Repaire me now, for now mine end doth haste, I runne to death, and death meets me as fast, And all my pleasures are like yesterday; I dare not move my dimme eyes any way, Despaire behind, and death before doth cast Such terrour, and my feeble flesh doth waste By sinne in it, which it t?wards hell doth weigh; Onely thou art above, and when towards thee By thy leave I can looke, I rise againe; But our old subtle foe so tempteth me, That not one houre my selfe I can sustaine; Thy Grace may wing me to prevent his art, And thou like Adamant draw mine iron heart....

Table of Contents: Holy Sonnets, 1 -- I, 1 -- II, 1 -- III, 2 -- IV, 2 -- V, 2 -- VI, 3 -- VII, 3 -- VIII, 3 -- IX, 4 -- X, 4 -- XI, 4 -- XII, 5 -- XIII, 5 -- XIV, 6 -- XV, 6 -- XVI, 6 -- XVII, 7 -- XVIII, 7 -- XIX, 7 -- THE CROSSE, 9 -- RESURRECTION, IMPERFECT, 11 -- UPON THE ANNUNTIATION AND PASSION, 12 -- GOOD FRIDAY, 1613. RIDING WESTWARD, 14 -- THE LITANIE, 15 -- UPON THE TPANSLATION OF THE PSALME, 22 -- TO MR. TILMAN AFTER HE HAD TAKEN ORDERS, 24 -- A HYMNE TO CHRIST, 26 -- THE LAMENTATIONS OF JEREMY, 27 -- HYMNE TO GOD MY GOD, IN MY SICKNESSE, 38 -- A HYMNE TO GOD THE FATHER, 39...

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In Memoriam

By: Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Excerpt: PROLOGUE; STRONG Son of God, immortal Love, Whom we, that have not seen thy face, By faith, and faith alone, embrace, Believing where we cannot prove; Thine are these orbs of light and shade; Thou madest Life in man and brute; Thou madest Death; and lo, thy foot Is on the skull which thou hast made. Thou wilt not leave us in the dust: Thou madest man, he knows not why; He thinks he was not made to die; And thou hast made him: thou art just. Thou seemest human and divine, The highest, holiest manhood, thou: Our wills are ours, we know not how; Our wills are ours, to make them thine. Our little systems have their day; They have their day and cease to be: They are but broken lights of thee, And thou, O Lord, art more than they. We have but faith: we cannot know; For knowledge is of things we see; And yet we trust it comes from thee, A beam in darkness: let it grow. Let knowledge grow from more to more, But more of reverence in us dwell; That mind and soul, according well, May make one music as before ......

Table of Contents: PROLOGUE, vi -- DEDICATION, viii -- I., 1 -- II., 2 -- III., 3 -- IV., 4 -- V., 5 -- VI., 6 -- VII., 8 -- VIII., 9 -- IX., 10 -- X., 11 -- XI., 12 -- XII., 13 -- XIII., 14 -- XIV., 15 -- XV., 16 -- XVI., 17 -- XVII., 18 -- XVIII., 19 -- XIX., 20 -- XX., 21 -- XXI., 22 -- XXII., 23 -- XXIII., 24 -- XXIV., 25 -- XXV., 26 -- XXVI., 27...

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The Taming of the Shrew

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Taming of the Shrew; Actus Primus -- Scaena Prima -- Enter Begger and Hostes, Christophero Sly. Begger. Ile pheeze you infaith. Host. A paire of stockes you rogue. Beg. Y?are a baggage, the Slies are no Rogues. Looke in the Chronicles, we came in with Richard Conqueror: therefore Paucas pallabris, let the world slide: Sessa. Host. You will not pay for the glasses you have burst? Beg. No, not a deniere: go by S[aint]. Jeronimie, goe to thy cold bed, and warme thee. Host. I know my remedie, I must go fetch the Head- borough. Beg. Third, or fourth, or fifth Borough, Ile answere him by Law. Ile not budge an inch boy: Let him come, and kindly. Falles asleepe. Winde hornes. Enter a Lord from hunting, with his traine. Lo. Huntsman I charge thee, tender wel my hounds, Brach Meriman, the poore Curre is imbost, And couple Clowder with the deepe- mouth?d brach, Saw?st thou not boy how Silver made it good At the hedge corner, in the couldest fault, I would not loose the dogge for twentie pound. Hunts. Why Belman is as good as he my Lord, He cried upon it at the meerest losse, And twice to day pick?d out the dullest sent, Trust me, ...

Table of Contents: The Taming of the Shrew, 1 -- Actus primus. Scaena Prima., 1 -- Actus Tertia., 29 -- Actus Quartus. Scena Prima., 44 -- Actus Quintus., 56...

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Loues Labour's Lost

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Loves Labour?s Lost; Actus Primus -- Enter Ferdinand King of Navarre, Berowne, Longavill, and Dumane. Ferdinand. Let Fame, that all hunt after in their lives, Live registred upon our brazen Tombes, And then grace us in the disgrace of death: when spight of cormorant devouring Time, Th? endevour of this present breath may buy: That honour which shall bate his sythes keene edge, And make us heyres of all eternitie. Therefore brave Conquerours, for so you are, That warre against your owne affections, And the huge Armie of the worlds desires. Our late edict shall strongly stand in force, Navar shall be the wonder of the world. Our Court shall be a little Achademe, Still and contemplative in living Art. You three, Berowne, Dumaine, and Longavill, Have sworne for three yeeres terme, to live with me: My fellow Schollers, and to keepe those statutes That are recorded in this scedule heere. Your oathes are past, and now subscribe your names: That his owne hand may strike his honour downe, That violates the smallest branch heerein: If you are arm?d to doe, as sworne to do, Subscribe to your deepe oathes, and keepe it to. Longavill. I...

Table of Contents: Loues Labour?s lost, 1 -- Actus primus., 1 -- Finis Actus Primus., 11 -- Actus Secunda., 12 -- Actus Tertius., 18 -- Actus Quartus., 22 -- Actus Quartus., 39...

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A Christmas Carol : In Prose

By: Charles Dickens

Excerpt: PREFACE; I HAVE endeavoured in this Ghostly little book, to raise the Ghost of an Idea, which shall not put my readers out of humour with themselves, with each other, with the season, or with me. May it haunt their houses pleasantly, and no one wish to lay it. Their faithful Friend and Servant, C. D. December, ....

Table of Contents: ILLUSTRATION: HE HAD BEEN TIM?S BLOOD HORSE, ii -- PREFACE, 1 -- MARLEY?S GHOST, 2 -- THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS, 17 -- THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS, 31 -- THE LAST OF THE THREE SPIRITS, 49 -- THE END OF IT, 61 -- ILLUSTRATION: BOB CRATCHIT AND TINY TIM., 67...

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The Tragedie of Troylus and Cressida

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Troylus and Cressida; The Prologue -- In Troy there lyes the Scene: From Iles of Greece The Princes Orgillous, their high blood chaf?d Have to the Port of Athens sent their shippes Fraught with the ministers and instruments Of cruell Warre: Sixty and nine that wore Their Crownets Regall, from th? Athenian bay Put forth toward Phrygia, and their vow is made To ransacke Troy, within whose strong emures The rauish?d Helen, Menelaus Queene, With wanton Paris sleepes, and that?s the Quarrell. To Tenedos they come, And the deepe- drawing Barke do there disgorge Their warlike frautage: now on Dardan Plaines The fresh and yet unbruised Greekes do pitch Their brave Pavillions. Priams six- gated City, Dardan and Timbria, Helias, Chetas, Troien, And Antenoridus with massie Staples And corresponsive and fulfilling Bolts Stirre up the Sonnes of Troy. Now Expectation tickling skittish spirits, On one and other side, Troian and Greeke, Sets all on hazard. And hither am I come, A Prologue arm?d, but not in confidence Of Authors pen, or Actors voyce; but suited In like conditions, as our Argument; To tell you (faire Beholder...

Table of Contents: The Tragedie of Troylus and Cressida, 1 -- The Prologue., 1 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 2

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The Tragedie of Julius C‘Sar

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Julius Caesar; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Flavius, Murellus, and certaine Commoners over the Stage. Flavius. Hence: home you idle Creatures, get you home: Is this a Holiday? What, know you not (Being Mechanicall) you ought not walke Upon a labouring day, without the signe Of your Profession? Speake, what Trade art thou? Car. Why Sir, a Carpenter. Mur. Where is thy Leather Apron, and thy Rule? What dost thou with thy best Apparrell on? You sir, what Trade are you? Cobl. Truely Sir, in respect of a fine Workman, I am but as you would say, a Cobler. Mur. But what Trade art thou? Answer me directly. Cob. A Trade Sir, that I hope I may use, with a safe Conscience, which is indeed Sir, a Mender of bad soules. Fla. What Trade thou knave? Thou naughty knave, what Trade? Cobl. Nay I beseech you Sir, be not out with me: yet if you be out Sir, I can mend you. Mur. What mean?st thou by that? Mend mee, thou sawcy Fellow? Cob. Why sir, Cobble you. Fla. Thou art a Cobler, art thou? Cob. Truly sir, all that I live by, is with the Aule: I meddle with no Tradesmans matters, nor women?s matters; but withal I am inde...

Table of Contents: The Tragedie of Julius C‘sar, 1 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 1 -- Actus Secundus., 14 -- Actus Tertius., 27 -- Actus Quartus., 41 -- Actus Quintus., 52...

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The Comedie of Errors

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Comedie of Errors; Actus Primus -- Scena Prima -- Enter the Duke of Ephesus, with the Merchant of Siracusa, Iaylor, and other attendants. Marchant. Proceed Solinus to procure my fall, And by the doome of death end woes and all. Duke. Merchant of Siracusa, plead no more. I am not partiall to infringe our Lawes; The enmity and discord which of late Sprung from the rancorous outrage of your Duke, To Merchants our well-dealing Countrimen, Who wanting gilders to redeeme their lives, Have seal?d his rigorous statutes with their blouds, Excludes all pitty from our threatning lookes: For since the mortall and intestine jarres Twixt thy seditious Countrimen and us, It hath in solemne Synodes beene decreed, Both by the Siracusians and our selves, To admit no trafficke to our aduerse townes: Nay more, if any borne at Ephesus Be seene at any Siracusian Marts and Fayres: Againe, if any Siracusian borne Come to the Bay of Ephesus, he dies: His goods confiscate to the Dukes dispose, Unlesse a thousand markes be levied To quit the penalty, and to ransome him: Thy substance, valued at the highest rate, Cannot amount unto a hundred Marke...

Table of Contents: The Comedie of Errors, 1 -- Actus primus, Scena prima., 1 -- Actus Secundus., 7 -- Actus Tertius. Scena Prima., 14 -- Actus Quartus. Scoena Prima., 22 -- Actus Quintus. Scoena Prima., 33...

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Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions

By: John Donne

Excerpt: VARIABLE, and therfore miserable condition of Man; this minute I was well, and am ill, this minute. I am surpriz?d with a sodaine change, and alteration to worse, and can impute it to no cause, nor call it by any name. We study Health, and we deliberate upon our meats, and drink, and ayre, and exercises, and we hew, and wee polish every stone, that goes to that building; and so our Health is a long and regular work; But in a minute a Canon batters all, overthrowes all, demolishes all; a Sicknes unprevented for all our diligence, unsuspected for all our curiositie; nay, undeserved, if we consider only disorder, summons us, seizes us, possesses us, destroyes us in an instant. O miserable condition of Man, which was not imprinted by God, who as hee is immortall himselfe, had put a coale, a beame of Immortalitie into us, which we might have blowen into a flame, but blew it out, by our first sinne; wee beggard our selves by hearkning after false riches, a?nd infatuated our selves by hearkning after false knowledge. So that now, we doe not onely die, but die upon the Rack, die by the torment of sicknesse; nor that onely, but are ...

Table of Contents: I., 1 -- II., 3 -- III., 4 -- IV., 6 -- V., 8 -- VI., 10 -- VII., 11 -- VIII., 13 -- IX., 15 -- X., 17 -- XI., 19 -- XII., 21 -- XIII., 23 -- XIV., 25 -- XV., 27 -- XVI., 29 -- XVII., 31 -- XVIII., 33 -- XIX., 35 -- XX., 37 -- XXI., 39 -- XXII., 41 -- XXIII., 43...

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Twelfe Night, Or What You Will

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Twelfe Night, Or what you will; Actus Primus -- Scaena Prima -- Enter Orsino Duke of Illyria, Curio, and other Lords. Duke. If Musicke be the food of Love, play on, Give me excesse of it: that surfetting, The appetite may sicken, and so dye. That straine agen, it had a dying fall: O, it came ore my eare, like the sweet sound That breathes upon a banke of Violets; Stealing, and giving Odour. Enough, no more, ?Tis not so sweet now, as it was before. O spirit of Love, how quicke and fresh art thou, That notwithstanding thy capacitie, Receiveth as the Sea. Nought enters there, Of what validity, and pitch so ere, But falles into abatement, and low price Even in a minute; so full of shapes is fancie, That it alone, is high fantasticall. Cu. Will you go hunt my Lord? Du. What Curio? Cu. The Hart. Du. Why so I do, the Noblest that I have: O when mine eyes did see Olivia first, Me thought she purg?d the ayre of pestilence; That instant was I turn?d into a Hart, And my desires like fell and cruell hounds, Ere since pursue me. How now what newes from her? Enter Valentine. Val. So please my Lord, I might not be admitted, But from her h...

Table of Contents: Twelfe Night, Or what you will, 1 -- Actus Primus, Scaena Prima., 1 -- Scena Secunda., 2 -- Scaena Tertia., 3 -- Scena Quarta., 6 -- Scena Quinta., 7 -- Finis, Actus primus., 14 -- Actus Secundus, Scaena prima., 14 -- Scaena Secunda., 16 -- Scoena Tertia., 17 -- Scena Quarta., 21 -- Scena Quinta., 24 -- Finis Actus secundus, 28 -- Actus Tertius, Scaena prima., 28 -- Scoena Secunda., 32 -- Scaena Tertia., 34 -- Scoena Quarta., 35 -- Actus Quartus, Scaena prima., 44 -- Scoena Secunda., 45 -- Scaena Tertia., 48 -- Finis Actus Quartus., 49 -- Actus Quintus. Scena Prima., 49...

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Silas Marner

By: George Eliot

Excerpt: PART I; CHAPTER I -- IN the days when the spinning-wheels hummed busily in the farmhouses--and even great ladies, clothed in silk and thread-lace, had their toy spinning-wheels of polished oak --there might be seen in districts far away among the lanes, or deep in the bosom of the hills, certain pallid undersized men, who, by the side of the brawny country-folk, looked like the remnants of a disinherited race. The shepherd?s dog barked fiercely when one of these alien-looking men appeared on the upland, dark against the early winter sunset; for what dog likes a figure bent under a heavy bag? --and these pale men rarely stirred abroad without that mysterious burden. The shepherd himself, though he had good reason to believe that the bag held nothing but flaxen thread, or else the long rolls of strong linen spun from that thread, was not quite sure that this trade of weaving, indispensable though it was, could be carried on entirely without the help of the Evil One. In that far-off time superstition clung easily round every person or thing that was at all unwonted, or even intermittent and occasional merely, like the visits o...

Table of Contents: CHAPTER I, 1 -- CHAPTER II, 10 -- CHAPTER III, 16 -- CHAPTER IV, 25 -- CHAPTER V, 31 -- CHAPTER VI, 35 -- CHAPTER VII, 43 -- CHAPTER VIII, 48 -- CHAPTER IX, 55 -- CHAPTER X, 61 -- CHAPTER XI, 73 -- CHAPTER XII, 88 -- CHAPTER XIII, 93 -- CHAPTER XIV, 99 -- CHAPTER XV, 109 -- CHAPTER XVI, 110 -- CHAPTER XVII, 122 -- CHAPTER XVIII, 131 -- CHAPTER XIX, 134 -- CHAPTER XX, 142 -- CHAPTER XXI, 144 -- CONCLUSION, 147...

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The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

By: Conan Doyle

Excerpt: A Scandal in Bohemia; TO SHERLOCK HOLMES she is always the woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akin to love for Irene Adler. All emotions, and that one particularly, were abhorrent to his cold, precise but admirably balanced mind. He was, I take it, the most perfect reasoning and observing machine that the world has seen, but as a lover he would have placed himself in a false position. He never spoke of the softer passions, save with a gibe and a sneer. They were admirable things for the observer--excellent for drawing the veil from men?s motives and actions. But for the trained reasoner to admit such intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperament was to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon all his mental results. Grit in a sensitive instrument, or a crack in one of his own high-power lenses, would not be more disturbing than a strong emotion in a nature such as his. And yet there was but one woman to him, and that woman was the late Irene Adler, of dubio...

Table of Contents: A Scandal in Bohemia, 1 -- I, 1 -- II, 9 -- III, 18 -- The Red-headed League, 21 -- A Case of Identity, 41 -- The Boscombe Valley Mystery, 56 -- The Five Orange Pips, 77 -- The Man with the Twisted Lip, 93 -- The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle, 113 -- The Adventure of the Speckled Band, 131 -- The Adventure of the Engineer?s Thumb, 152 -- The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor, 170 -- The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet, 189 -- The Adventure of the Copper Beeches, 210...

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Measure, For Measure

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Measure For Measure; Actus Primus -- Scena Prima -- Enter Duke, Escalus, Lords. Duke. Escalus. Esc. My Lord. Duk. Of Government, the properties to unfold, Would seeme in me t? affect speech & discourse, Since I am put to know, that your owne Science Exceedes (in that) the lists of all aduice My strength can give you: Then no more remaines But that, to your sufficiency, as your worth is able, And let them worke: The nature of our People, Our Cities Institutions, and the Termes For Common Justice, y?are as pregnant in As Art, and practise, hath inriched any That we remember: There is our Commission, From which, we would not have you warpe; call hither, I say, bid come before us Angelo: What figure of us thinke you, he will beare. For you must know, we have with speciall soule Elected him our absence to supply; Lent him our terror, drest him with our love, And given his Deputation all the Organs Of our owne powre: What thinke you of it? Esc. If any in Vienna be of worth To undergoe such ample grace, and honour, It is Lord Angelo. Enter Angelo. Duk. Looke where he comes. Ang. Alwayes obedient to your Graces will, I come to know...

Table of Contents: Measvre, For Measure, 1 -- Actus primus, Scena prima., 1 -- Scena Secunda., 3 -- Scena Tertia., 5 -- Scena Quarta., 7 -- Scena Quinta., 9 -- Actus Secundus. Scoena Prima., 11 -- Scena Secunda., 17 -- Scena Tertia., 22 -- Scena Quarta., 23 -- Actus Tertius. Scena Prima., 28 -- Actus Quartus. Scoena Prima., 40 -- Scena Secunda., 42 -- Scena Tertia., 47 -- Scena Quarta., 51 -- Scena Quinta., 52 -- Scena Sexta., 52 -- Actus Quintus. Scoena Prima., 53...

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Sartor Resartus the Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdr Ockh

By: Thomas Carlyle

Excerpt: CHAPTER I; PRELIMINARY -- CONSIDERING our present advanced state of culture, and how the Torch of Science has now been brandished and borne about, with more or less effect, for five thousand years and upwards; how, in these times especially, not only the Torch still burns, and perhaps more fiercely than ever, but innumerable Rushlights, and Sulphur-matches, kindled thereat, are also glancing in every direction, so that not the smallest cranny or dog-hole in Nature or Art can remain unilluminated,--it might strike the reflective mind with some surprise that hitherto little or nothing of a fundamental character, whether in the way of Philosophy or History, has been written on the subject of Clothes. Our Theory of Gravitation is as good as perfect: Lagrange, it is well known, has proved that the Planetary System, on this scheme, will endure forever; Laplace, still more cunningly, even guesses that it could not have been made on any other scheme. Whereby, at least, our nautical Logbooks can be better kept; and watertransport of all kinds has grown more commodious. Of Geology and Geognosy we know enough: what with the labors of ...

Table of Contents: BOOK I 3 -- CHAPTER I ?PRELIMINARY, 3 -- CHAPTER II ?EDITORIAL DIFFICULTIES, 7 -- CHAPTER III ?REMINISCENCES, 11 -- CHAPTER IV? CHARACTERISTICS, 19 -- CHAPTER V? THE WORLD IN CLOTHES, 24 -- CHAPTER VI? APRONS, 29 -- CHAPTER VII? MISCELLANEOUS-HISTORICAL, 31 -- CHAPTER VIII? THE WORLD OUT OF CLOTHES, 34 -- CHAPTER IX? ADAMITISM, 39 -- CHAPTER X? PURE REASON, 43 -- CHAPTER XI? PROSPECTIVE, 47 -- BOOK II 55 -- CHAPTER I ?GENESIS, 55 -- CHAPTER II ?IDYLLIC, 61 -- CHAPTER III ?PEDAGOGY, 68 -- CHAPTER IV? GETTING UNDER WAY, 79 -- CHAPTER V? ROMANCE, 88 -- CHAPTER VI? SORROWS OF TEUFELSDRO? CKH, 97 -- CHAPTER VII? THE EVERLASTING NO, 104 -- CHAPTER VIII? CENTRE OF INDIFFERENCE, 110 -- CHAPTER IX? THE EVERLASTING YEA, 118 -- CHAPTER X? PAUSE, 126 -- BOOK III 133 -- CHAPTER I ?INCIDENT IN MODERN HISTORY, 133 -- CHAPTER II ?CHURCH-CLOTHES, 137...

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The Collected Poems

By: William Butler Yeats

Excerpt: THE SONG OF THE HAPPY SHEPHERD; THE woods of Arcady are dead, And over is their antique joy; Of old the world on dreaming fed; Grey Truth is now her painted toy; Yet still she turns her restless head: But O, sick children of the world, Of all the many changing things In dreary dancing past us whirled, To the cracked tune that Chronos sings, Words alone are certain good. Where are now the warring kings, Word be-mockers?--By the Rood, Where are now the watring kings? An idle word is now their glory, By the stammering schoolboy said, Reading some entangled story: The kings of the old time are dead; The wandering earth herself may be Only a sudden flaming word, In clanging space a moment heard, Troubling the endless reverie. Then nowise worship dusty deeds, Nor seek, for this is also sooth, To hunger fiercely after truth, Lest all thy toiling only breeds New dreams, new dreams; there is no truth Saving in thine own heart. Seek, then, No learning from the starry men, Who follow with the optic glass The whirling ways of stars that pass--Seek, then, for this is also sooth, No word of theirs--the cold star-bane Has cloven and rent ...

Table of Contents: LYRICAL 3 -- CROSSWAYS 5 -- THE SONG OF THE HAPPY SHEPHERD, 5 -- THE SAD SHEPHERD, 6 -- THE CLOAK, THE BOAT, AND THE SHOES, 7 -- ANASHUYA AND VIJAYA, 8 -- THE INDIAN UPON GOD, 11 -- THE INDIAN TO HIS LOVE, 11 -- THE FALLING OF THE LEAVES, 12 -- EPHEMERA, 13 -- THE MADNESS OF KING GOLL, 13 -- THE STOLEN CHILD, 16 -- TO AN ISLE IN THE WATER, 17 -- DOWN BY THE SALLEY GARDENS, 18 -- THE MEDITATION OF THE OLD FISHERMAN, 18 -- THE BALLAD OF FATHER O?HART, 19 -- THE BALLAD OF MOLL MAGEE, 20 -- THE BALLAD OF THE FOXHUNTER, 22 -- THE ROSE 26 -- TO THE ROSE UPON THE ROOD OF TIME, 26 -- FERGUS AND THE DRUID, 26 -- CUCHULAIN?S FIGHT WITH THE SEA, 28 -- THE ROSE OF THE WORLD, 31 -- THE ROSE OF PEACE, 31 -- THE ROSE OF BATTLE, 32 -- A FAERY SONG, 33 -- THE LAKE ISLE OF INNISFREE, 34...

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The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, Of York, Mariner : Who Lived Eight and Twenty Years All Alone in an Un-Inhabited Island on the Coast of America, Near the Mouth of the Great River of Oroonoque; Having Been Cast on Shore by Shipwreck, Wherein All the Men Perished but Himself, With an Account How He Was at Last as Strangely Deliver'D by Pyrates

By: Daniel Defoe

Excerpt: THE PREFACE; If ever the story of any private Man?s Adventures in the World were worth making Publick, and were acceptable when Publish?d, the Editor of this Account thinks this will be so. The Wonders of this Man?s Life exceed all that (he thinks)is to be found extant; the Life of one Man being scarce capable of a greater Variety. The Story is told with Modesty, with Seriousness, and with a religious Application of Events to the Uses to which wise Men always apply them (viz.) to the Instruction of others by this Example, and to justify and honour the Wisdom of Providence in all the Variety of our Circumstances, let them happen how they will. The Editor believes the thing to be a just History of Fact; neither is there any Appearance of Fiction in it: And however thinks, because all such things are dispatch?d, that the Improvement of it, as well to the Diversion, as to the Instruction of the Reader, will be the same; and as such, he thinks, without father Compliment to the World, he does them a great Service in the Publication....

Table of Contents: THE PREFACE, 1 -- THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE, &c., 2 -- THE JOURNAL., 51

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