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Records: 1 - 20 of 128 - Pages: 
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Adrift on an Ice-Pan

By: Sir Wilfred Grenfell

This autobiographical work describes the author's harrowing experience caught on a small drifting piece of ice, while crossing a frozen bay by dog team on the Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland. (Summary by Sean Michael Hogan)...

Memoirs

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Tom Brown's School Days

By: Thomas Hughes

Tom Brown's Schooldays is a novel by Thomas Hughes first published in 1857. The story is set at Rugby School, a public school for boys, in the 1830s. Hughes attended Rugby School from 1834 to 1842. The novel was originally published as being by an Old Boy of Rugby, and much of it is based on the author's experiences. Tom Brown is largely based on the author's brother, George Hughes; and George Arthur, another of the book's main characters, is based on Arthur Penrhyn Stanley. The fictional Tom's life also resembles the author's in that the culminating event of his school career was a cricket match. Tom Brown was tremendously influential on the genre of British school novels, which began in the 19th century, and is one of the few still in print. A sequel, Tom Brown at Oxford, was published in 1861 but is not as well known. (Summary from Wikipedia)...

Memoirs

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Aus meinem Leben. Dichtung und Wahrheit

By: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Aus meinem Leben. Dichtung und Wahrheit ist eine zwischen 1808 und 1831 entstandene Autobiographie, in der Johann Wolfgang von Goethe seine Erlebnisse aus den Jahren 1749 bis 1775 liebevoll darstellt. Nach Richard Friedenthal ist diese mannigfaltig vorschreitende Lebensgeschichte einer der großen deutschen Romane - ein Hausbuch. (Zusammenfassung von Wikipedia)...

Memoirs

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Confessions, volumes 3 and 4

By: Jean-Jacques Rousseau

“The smallest, the most trifling pleasure that is conveniently within my reach, tempts me more than all the joys of paradise.” Here again is the youthful, hero-worshipping Jean-Jacques – displaying an emotional immaturity that leads him into picaresque escapades in the company of transients and misfits, always ending in reunion with mother-surrogate Madame de Warens. In a literally unprecedented gesture of self-revelation, Rousseau opens Volume 3 exposing himself indecently in dark alleyways. This 1903 edition fails to appreciate the humorous strangeness of the passage and removes it to protect the reader. (Summary by Martin Geeson) Volumes 1 and 2 of this book can be found /confessions-volumes-1-and-2-by-jean-jacques-rousseau/ here...

Memoirs

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Cruise of the Snark, The

By: Jack London

The Cruise of the Snark (1913) is a memoir of Jack and Charmian London's 1907-1909 voyage across the Pacific. His descriptions of surf-riding, which he dubbed a royal sport, helped introduce it to and popularize it with the mainland. London writes: Through the white crest of a breaker suddenly appears a dark figure, erect, a man-fish or a sea-god, on the very forward face of the crest where the top falls over and down, driving in toward shore, buried to his loins in smoking spray, caught up by the sea and flung landward, bodily, a quarter of a mile. It is a Kanaka on a surf-board. And I know that when I have finished these lines I shall be out in that riot of colour and pounding surf, trying to bit those breakers even as he, and failing as he never failed, but living life as the best of us may live it. Excerpted from Wikipedia....

Memoirs

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Small Boy and Others, A

By: Henry James

A Small Boy and Others is a book of autobiography by Henry James published in 1913. The book covers James's earliest years and discusses his intellectually active family, his intermittent schooling, and his first trips to Europe. (Summary from Wikipedia)...

Memoirs

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Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Written by Herself

By: Harriet Jacobs

Harriet Jacobs' autobiography, written under the pseudonym Linda Brent, details her experiences as a slave in North Carolina, her escape to freedom in the north, and her ensuing struggles to free her children. The narrative was partly serialized in the New York Tribune, but was discontinued because Jacobs' depictions of the sexual abuse of female slaves were considered too shocking. It was published in book form in 1861. (Summary by Elizabeth Klett)....

Memoirs

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Untrodden Peaks and Unfrequented Valleys

By: Amelia B. Edwards

Amelia B. Edwards wrote this historical travelogue in in 1873. The book describes her travels through a relatively un-visited area in the South Tyrol district of Italy. The Dolomites are a part of that most famous of mountain chains, the Alps. In this book, the Writer and her friend and companion, L., travel from Southern Italy, having over-wintered there, to visit the Dolomite district. Her chatty style, dry sense of humor, accuracy of facts, and sympathy for humanity set her works apart. The slice of Victorian British life presented is quite captivating. She would later travel throughout Europe and Egypt at a time when most women didn't leave home. Later she was to become one of the pioneering Egyptologists of the age. This is her first travelogue....

Memoirs

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Football Days: Memories of the Game and of the Men behind the Ball

By: William Hanford Edwards

A book reminiscent of the days when football was gaining popularity in America by MHAIJH85

Memoirs

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My Life in the South

By: Jacob Stroyer

My Life in the South is the vivid and touching autobiography of African-American former slave, Jacob Stroyer. It recounts experiences from his early childhood on the planation up to his involvement in Confederacy's war effort and eventually his experience of becoming a free man....

Memoirs

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Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant

By: Ulysses S. Grant

In preparing these volumes for the public, I have entered upon the task with the sincere desire to avoid doing injustice to any one, whether on the National or Confederate side, other than the unavoidable injustice of not making mention often where special mention is due. There must be many errors of omission in this work, because the subject is too large to be treated of in two volumes in such way as to do justice to all the officers and men engaged. There were thousands of instances, during the rebellion, of individual, company, regimental and brigade deeds of heroism which deserve special mention and are not here alluded to. The troops engaged in them will have to look to the detailed reports of their individual commanders for the full history of those deeds. (Summary by U. S. Grant)...

Memoirs

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Confessions of an English Opium-Eater

By: Thomas De Quincey

“Thou hast the keys of Paradise, O just, subtle, and mighty Opium!” Though apparently presenting the reader with a collage of poignant memories, temporal digressions and random anecdotes, the Confessions is a work of immense sophistication and certainly one of the most impressive and influential of all autobiographies. The work is of great appeal to the contemporary reader, displaying a nervous (postmodern?) self-awareness, a spiralling obsession with the enigmas of its own composition and significance. De Quincey may be said to scrutinise his life, somewhat feverishly, in an effort to fix his own identity. The title seems to promise a graphic exposure of horrors; these passages do not make up a large part of the whole. The circumstances of its hasty composition sets up the work as a lucrative piece of sensational journalism, albeit published in a more intellectually respectable organ – the London Magazine – than are today’s tawdry exercises in tabloid self-exposure. What makes the book technically remarkable is its use of a majestic neoclassical style applied to a very romantic species of confessional writing - self-reflexive but a...

Memoirs

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Travels in Alaska

By: John Muir

In 1879 John Muir went to Alaska for the first time. Its stupendous living glaciers aroused his unbounded interest, for they enabled him to verify his theories of glacial action. Again and again he returned to this continental laboratory of landscapes. The greatest of the tide-water glaciers appropriately commemorates his name. Upon this book of Alaska travels, all but finished before his unforeseen departure, John Muir expended the last months of his life. (Summary by William Frederic Bade)...

Adventure, Memoirs, Nature, Travel

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Around the World on a Bicycle, Vol. 2

By: Thomas Stevens

Thomas Stevens was the first person to circle the globe by bicycle, a large-wheeled Ordinary. His journey started in April 1884 in San Francisco from where he cycled to Boston to take a steamer to England. Crossing England, France, Central Europe and Asia Minor before he was turned back at the borders of Afghanistan. He returned part of the way to take a ship to Karachi, from where he crossed India. Another steam ship brought him from Calcutta to Hong Kong, and from Shanghai he set over to Japan, finally ending his journey after actually cycling 13.500 miles in Yokohama, December 1886. This is the second volume (of two) relating his travel experiences, detailing the part of the journey from Teheran to Yokohama. (Summary by Availle)...

Adventure, Memoirs, Travel

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Hollywood: Its Morals and Manners

By: Theodore Dreiser

Serialized in Shadowland from November 1921 to February 1922, Hollywood: Its Morals and Manners is Theodore Dreiser's shocking four part expose on the motion picture industry. In it, he shares his observations from his extended stay in Los Angeles, and gives us an intimate look at the seedier underside of Hollywood. (Summary by ChuckW)...

Essay/Short nonfiction, Memoirs

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John Barleycorn or Alcoholic Memoirs

By: Jack London

Jack London died at the age of forty. In this autobiographical work, London describes his life as seen through the eyes of John Barleycorn (alcohol). There is much controversy about the cause of his death just as there is about alcoholism and addiction. London's brutally frank and honest analysis of his own struggles and bouts with alcohol was way before its time and more modern theories of addiction. With remarkable candor and insight, London describes the demons and gods he encountered through both friend and enemy, John Barleycorn. (Summary by Peter Kelleher)...

Memoirs, Biography

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Amateur Emigrant, The

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

In July 1879, Robert Louis Stevenson left Scotland to meet his future wife in her native California. Leaving by ship from Glasgow, Scotland, he determined to travel in steerage class to see how the working classes fared. At the last minute he was convinced by friends to purchase a ticket one grade above the lowest price, for which he was later thankful after seeing the conditions in steerage, but he still lived among the 'lower' classes. His comments on the experience make interesting reading. His father however was so shocked at the thought of his son associating with people 'beneath him' that the work was not published for a number of years, (Summary by annise)...

Memoirs, Travel

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Around the World on a Bicycle, Vol. 1

By: Thomas Stevens

Thomas Stevens was the first person to circle the globe by bicycle, a large-wheeled Ordinary. His journey started in April 1884 in San Francisco from where he cycled to Boston to take a steamer to England. Crossing England, France, Central Europe and Asia Minor before he was turned back at the borders of Afghanistan. He returned part of the way to take a ship to Karachi, from where he crossed India. Another steam ship brought him from Calcutta to Hong Kong, and from Shanghai he set over to Japan, finally ending his journey after actually cycling 13.500 miles in Yokohama, December 1886. This is the first volume of his travel experiences, detailing the part of the journey from San Francisco to Teheran, where he spent the winter. (Summary by Availle)...

Adventure, Memoirs, Travel

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Being a Boy

By: Charles Dudley Warner

Warner's thoughtful and often humorous memoir of his life as a young farm-boy in Charlemont, Massachusetts. (Introduction by Mark Penfold)

Biography, Memoirs

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Reise in das Innere der Insel Formosa, Eine

By: Karl Theodor Stöpel

Eine Reise in das Innere der Insel Formosa und die erste Besteigung des Niitakayama (Mount Morrison) Weihnachten 1898, so der vollständige Titel des 1905 in Buenos Aires erschienen Reisetagebuchs von Karl Theodor Stöpel. Nach einer umfassenden Einleitung zur Geschichte, Geographie und Topographie schildert uns K. TH. Stöpel seine Reisererlebnisse zur Zeit der japanischen Besetzung von Formosa. Seine Bericht wird geprägt durch die Eindrücke der Hinterlassenschaften eines Taifuns, durch den Aufstand gegen die japanischen Besatzer und letztlich der Besteigung des Niitakayama. Karl Theodor Stöpel (1862-1940) machte sich vor allem einen Namen als Volkswissenschaftler und Forschungsreisender. Aus seiner Feder stammt auch das Werk Die deutsche Kaliindustrie und das Kalisyndikat. (1904) . Die Bezeichnung Iha Formosa stammt aus dem Portugiesischen und heißt soviel wie „schöne Insel“. Heute ist diese Inseln unter dem Namen Taiwan bekannt. (Zusammenfassung von Wassermann)...

Adventure, Memoirs, Nature, Travel

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