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Latin (X) History (X)

       
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On the Babylonian Captivity of the Church

By: Martin Luther

Martin Luther goes through the seven sacraments of the medieval Catholic Church with his interpretation of the Bible. He teaches his opinions on the different pratices taken place within the Catholic Church and what they should or do represent. The book is seemingly set in an "angry tone" as this was the first time he accused the pope of being the Antichrist. Luther's book was further published in German by his opponent Franciscan Thomas Murner, in hopes that he would make people aware of the foolishness of supporting Luther....

“Rise up then, you popish flatterers, one and all! Get busy and defend yourselves against the charges of impiety, tyranny, and lèse-majesté against the gospel, and of the crime of slandering your brethren. You decry as heretics those who refuse to contravene such plain and powerful words of Scripture in order to acknowledge the mere dreams of your brains! If any are to be called heretics and schismatics, it is not the Bohemians or the Greeks,47 for they take their stand upon the Gospels. It is you Romans who are the heretics and godless schismatics, for you presume upon your figments alone against the clear Scriptures of God. Wash yourself of that, men!”...

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Principa Mathematica

By: Isaac Newton

Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica, Latin for "Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy", often referred to as simply the Principia, is a work in three books by Sir Isaac Newton, first published 5 July 1687. Newton also published two further editions, in 1713 and 1726. The Principia states Newton's laws of motion, forming the foundation of classical mechanics, also Newton's law of universal gravitation, and a derivation of Kepler's laws of planetary motion (which Kepler first obtained empirically). The Principia is "justly regarded as one of the most important works in the history of science". The French mathematical physicist Alexis Clairaut assessed it in 1747: "The famous book of mathematical Principles of natural Philosophy marked the epoch of a great revolution in physics. The method followed by its illustrious author Sir Newton, spread the light of mathematics on a science which up to then had remained in the darkness of conjectures and hypotheses." A more recent assessment has been that while acceptance of Newton's theories was not immediate, by the end of a century after publication in 1687, "no one could deny...

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Historia Apollonii Regis Tyri

By: anonymous

Apollonius of Tyre is the subject of an ancient short novella, popular during medieval times. Existing in numerous forms in many languages, the text is thought to be translated from an ancient Greek manuscript, now lost. The earliest manuscripts of the tale, in a Latin version, date from the 9th or 10th century; the most widespread Latin versions are those of Gottfried von Viterbo, who incorporated it into his Pantheon of 1185 as if it were actual history, and a version in the Gesta Romanorum. Shakespeare's play Pericles, Prince of Tyre was based in part on Gower's version, with the change of name probably inspired by Philip Sidney's Arcadia. Apollonius of Tyre was also a source for his plays Twelfth Night and The Comedy of Errors....

Humor, Historical Fiction

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Aeneidis Libri XII

By: Publius Vergilius Maro

Aeneas flees the destruction of Troy, abandons Dido, queen of the Carthaginians, and wends his way to Latium in Italy, where slaying Turnus, leader of native resistance, he founds the future Rome. (Summary by Malone)...

Ancient Texts, Classics (antiquity), Poetry

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De Bello Gallico Libri Septem

By: Gaius Julius Caesar

In this book the famous Gaius Julius Caesar himself describes the seven years of his war in Gaul. When Caesar got proconsul of Gallia and Illyria in 58 B.C, the conquest of land in Gaul was an urgent need, both to improve his political standing and to calm his creditors in Rome. So Caesar claims his interest for a very large area already in the first sentence. His steps and measures always appear clear and logic, but this simplicity is the result of a strict discipline in style. Caesar really choses his words, and the list of standard words that he never or rarely uses, is astonishing. E.g. for river he only uses flumen and never fluvius or amnis. He avoids porro (furthermore), which would be no decided beginning of a sentence, and in his writings never occurs the word clades (the defeat), although this would normally be demanded by the context. It is remarkable, that still today in all the lands of his conquest the word for peace is derived from latin pax (even basque bake). This peace is no friendship between equals, which is the idea behind the german word Friede. Pax Romana implies subordination, and this concept was promoted by...

Classics (antiquity), Ancient Texts, History, War stories

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