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Reprinted Pieces

By: Charles Dickens

Excerpt: Reprinted Pieces by Charles Dickens.

Contents THE LONG VOYAGE ...................................................................................................................... 5 THE BEGGING-LETTER WRITER ........................................................................................... 14 A CHILD?S DREAM OF A STAR................................................................................................. 21 OUR ENGLISH WATERING-PLACE ......................................................................................... 24 OUR FRENCH WATERING-PLACE........................................................................................... 33 BILL-STICKING ............................................................................................................................ 46 LYING AWAKE.............................................................................................................................. 62 THE GHOST OF ART.................................................................................................................... 69 OUT OF TOWN .........................................................................................

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Charles Dickens 200th Anniversary Collection Vol. 1

By: Charles Dickens

The Charles Dickens 200th Anniversary Collection comprises short works previously unrecorded for - fiction, essays, poetry, letters, magazine articles and speeches - and each volume will be a pot pourri of all genres and periods of his writing. This first volume is released on Dickens' 200th birthday, February 7th 2012. Further volumes will follow during the anniversary year. Volume 1 includes short stories including, amongst others, The Holly Tree , the first part of Holiday Romance and three pieces from Mugby Junction . Some items requiring a little further explanation are Prince Bull , written as a fairy tale, but in reality a scathing attack on the Government's handling of supplies to the troops in the Crimean War; Old Lamps for New Ones in which Dickens makes clear his low opinion of the ethos of the Pre-Raphaelite school of painting; and Frauds on the Fairies , a polemic against George Cruikshank's bowdlerisation of fairy tales for moralistic purposes, and the interesting revelation that 'product placement' is by no means a new phenomenon. (Introduction by Ruth Golding)...

Essay/Short nonfiction, Fiction, Poetry, Short stories, Art, Politics

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Through the Brazilian Wilderness

By: Theodore Roosevelt

Roosevelt's popular book Through the Brazilian Wilderness describes his expedition into the Brazilian jungle in 1913 as a member of the Roosevelt-Rondon Scientific Expedition co-named after its leader, Brazilian explorer Cândido Rondon. The book describes all of the scientific discovery, scenic tropical vistas and exotic flora, fauna and wild life experienced on the expedition. One goal of the expedition was to find the headwaters of the Rio da Duvida, the River of Doubt, and trace it north to the Madeira and thence to the Amazon River. It was later renamed Rio Roosevel. Roosevelt's crew consisted of his 24-year-old son Kermit, Colonel Cândido Rondon, a naturalist sent by the American Museum of Natural History named George K. Cherrie, Brazilian Lieutenant Joao Lyra, team physician Dr. José Antonio Cajazeira, and sixteen highly skilled paddlers (called camaradas in Portuguese). The initial expedition started on December 9, 1913, at the height of the rainy season. The trip down the River of Doubt started on February 27, 1914. During the trip down the river, Roosevelt contracted malaria and a serious infection resulting from a minor le...

Adventure, History, Memoirs, Nature, Science

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Little Lord Fauntleroy

By: Frances Hodgson Burnett

Little Lord Fauntleroy is a sentimental children's novel by American (English-born) author Frances Hodgson Burnett, serialized in St. Nicholas Magazine in 1885. It was a runaway hit for the magazine and was separately published in 1886. The book was a commercial success for its author, and its illustrations by Reginal Birch set fashion trends. Little Lord Fauntleroy also set a precedent in copyright law in 1888 when its author won a lawsuit over the rights to theatrical adaptations of the work. (Summary from Wikipedia)...

Children, Teen/Young adult

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Catherine : A Story

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

Excerpt: Advertisement. The story of ?Catherine,? which appeared in Fraser?s Magazine in 1839-40, was written by Mr. Thackeray, under the name of Ikey Solomons, Jun., to counteract the injurious influence of some popular fictions of that day, which made heroes of highwaymen and burglars, and created a false sympathy for the vicious and criminal....

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The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, Of York, Mariner : Who Lived Eight and Twenty Years All Alone in an Un-Inhabited Island on the Coast of America, Near the Mouth of the Great River of Oroonoque; Having Been Cast on Shore by Shipwreck, Wherein All the Men Perished but Himself, With an Account How He Was at Last as Strangely Deliver'D by Pyrates

By: Daniel Defoe

Excerpt: THE PREFACE; If ever the story of any private Man?s Adventures in the World were worth making Publick, and were acceptable when Publish?d, the Editor of this Account thinks this will be so. The Wonders of this Man?s Life exceed all that (he thinks)is to be found extant; the Life of one Man being scarce capable of a greater Variety. The Story is told with Modesty, with Seriousness, and with a religious Application of Events to the Uses to which wise Men always apply them (viz.) to the Instruction of others by this Example, and to justify and honour the Wisdom of Providence in all the Variety of our Circumstances, let them happen how they will. The Editor believes the thing to be a just History of Fact; neither is there any Appearance of Fiction in it: And however thinks, because all such things are dispatch?d, that the Improvement of it, as well to the Diversion, as to the Instruction of the Reader, will be the same; and as such, he thinks, without father Compliment to the World, he does them a great Service in the Publication....

Table of Contents: THE PREFACE, 1 -- THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE, &c., 2 -- THE JOURNAL., 51

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A Journal of the Plague Year

By: Daniel Defoe

Excerpt: It was about the beginning of September, 1664, that I, mong the rest of my neighbors, heard in ordinary dis course that the plague was returned again in Holland; for it had been very violent there, and particularly at Amsterdam and Rotterdam, in the year 1663, whither, they say, it was brought, some said from Italy, others from the Levant, among some goods which were brought home by their Turkey fleet; others said it was brought from Candia; others from Cyprus. It mattered not from whence it came; but all agreed it was come into Holland again....

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Memories and Portraits

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

Excerpt: Chapter 1. The Foreigner At Home. ?This is no my ain house; I ken by the biggin? o?t.? Two recent books* one by Mr. Grant White on England, one on France by the diabolically clever Mr. Hillebrand, may well have set people thinking on the divisions of races and nations. Such thoughts should arise with particular congruity and force to inhabitants of that United Kingdom, peopled from so many different stocks, babbling so many different dialects, and offering in its extent such singular contrasts, from the busiest over-population to the unkindliest desert, from the Black Country to the Moor of Rannoch. It is not only when we cross the seas that we go abroad; there are foreign parts of England; and the race that has conquered so wide an empire has not yet managed to assimilate the islands whence she sprang. Ireland, Wales, and the Scottish mountains still cling, in part, to their old Gaelic speech. It was but the other day that English triumphed in Cornwall, and they still show in Mousehole, on St. Michael?s Bay, the house of the last Cornish-speaking woman. English itself, which will now frank the traveller through the most of...

Contents CHAPTER I: THE FOREIGNER AT HOME ..................................................................................... 5 CHAPTER II: SOME COLLEGE MEMORIES................................................................................ 14 CHAPTER III: OLD MORTALITY .................................................................................................. 20 CHAPTER IV: A COLLEGE MAGAZINE ...................................................................................... 28 CHAPTER V: AN OLD SCOTCH GARDENER ............................................................................. 36 CHAPTER VI: PASTORAL .............................................................................................................. 41 CHAPTER VII: THE MANSE .......................................................................................................... 48 CHAPTER VIII: MEMOIRS OF AN ISLET .................................................................................... 53 CHAPTER IX: THOMAS STEVENSON ? CIVIL ENGINEER...................................................... 58 CHAPTER X: TALK AND TALKERS ....................

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The Taming of the Shrew

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Taming of the Shrew; Actus Primus -- Scaena Prima -- Enter Begger and Hostes, Christophero Sly. Begger. Ile pheeze you infaith. Host. A paire of stockes you rogue. Beg. Y?are a baggage, the Slies are no Rogues. Looke in the Chronicles, we came in with Richard Conqueror: therefore Paucas pallabris, let the world slide: Sessa. Host. You will not pay for the glasses you have burst? Beg. No, not a deniere: go by S[aint]. Jeronimie, goe to thy cold bed, and warme thee. Host. I know my remedie, I must go fetch the Head- borough. Beg. Third, or fourth, or fifth Borough, Ile answere him by Law. Ile not budge an inch boy: Let him come, and kindly. Falles asleepe. Winde hornes. Enter a Lord from hunting, with his traine. Lo. Huntsman I charge thee, tender wel my hounds, Brach Meriman, the poore Curre is imbost, And couple Clowder with the deepe- mouth?d brach, Saw?st thou not boy how Silver made it good At the hedge corner, in the couldest fault, I would not loose the dogge for twentie pound. Hunts. Why Belman is as good as he my Lord, He cried upon it at the meerest losse, And twice to day pick?d out the dullest sent, Trust me, ...

Table of Contents: The Taming of the Shrew, 1 -- Actus primus. Scaena Prima., 1 -- Actus Tertia., 29 -- Actus Quartus. Scena Prima., 44 -- Actus Quintus., 56...

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The Comedie of Errors

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Comedie of Errors; Actus Primus -- Scena Prima -- Enter the Duke of Ephesus, with the Merchant of Siracusa, Iaylor, and other attendants. Marchant. Proceed Solinus to procure my fall, And by the doome of death end woes and all. Duke. Merchant of Siracusa, plead no more. I am not partiall to infringe our Lawes; The enmity and discord which of late Sprung from the rancorous outrage of your Duke, To Merchants our well-dealing Countrimen, Who wanting gilders to redeeme their lives, Have seal?d his rigorous statutes with their blouds, Excludes all pitty from our threatning lookes: For since the mortall and intestine jarres Twixt thy seditious Countrimen and us, It hath in solemne Synodes beene decreed, Both by the Siracusians and our selves, To admit no trafficke to our aduerse townes: Nay more, if any borne at Ephesus Be seene at any Siracusian Marts and Fayres: Againe, if any Siracusian borne Come to the Bay of Ephesus, he dies: His goods confiscate to the Dukes dispose, Unlesse a thousand markes be levied To quit the penalty, and to ransome him: Thy substance, valued at the highest rate, Cannot amount unto a hundred Marke...

Table of Contents: The Comedie of Errors, 1 -- Actus primus, Scena prima., 1 -- Actus Secundus., 7 -- Actus Tertius. Scena Prima., 14 -- Actus Quartus. Scoena Prima., 22 -- Actus Quintus. Scoena Prima., 33...

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The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin with Introduction and Notes Edited

By: Charles W. Eliot

Introduction: Benjamin Franklin was born in Milk Street, Boston, on January 6, 1706. His father, Josiah Franklin, was a tallow chandler who married twice, and of his seventeen children Benjamin was the youngest son. His schooling ended at ten, and at twelve he was bound apprentice to his brother James, a printer, who published the ?New England Courant.? To this journal he became a contributor, and later was for a time its nominal editor....

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Familiar Studies of Men and Books

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

Excerpt: Preface By Way Of Criticism. These studies are collected from the monthly press. One appeared in the New Quarterly, one in MacMillan?s, and the rest in the Cornhill Magazine. To the Cornhill I owe a double debt of thanks; first, that I was received there in the very best society, and under the eye of the very best of editors; and second, that the proprietors have allowed me to republish so considerable an amount of copy....

Contents PREFACE BY WAY OF CRITICISM. ........................................................................................... 4 CHAPTER I ? VICTOR HUGO?S ROMANCES ........................................................................ 15 CHAPTER II ? SOME ASPECTS OF ROBERT BURNS.......................................................... 34 CHAPTER III ? WALT WHITMAN............................................................................................. 63 CHAPTER IV ? HENRY DAVID THOREAU: HIS CHARACTER AND OPINIONS........... 84 CHAPTER V ? YOSHIDA-TORAJIRO..................................................................................... 107 CHAPTER VI ? FRANCOIS VILLON, STUDENT, POET, AND HOUSEBREAKER.........117 CHAPTER VII ? CHARLES OF ORLEANS ............................................................................ 141 CHAPTER VIII ? SAMUEL PEPYS .......................................................................................... 170 CHAPTER IX ? JOHN KNOX AND HIS RELATIONS TO WOMEN .................................. 190...

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Best of Four

By: Carol Ann Ellis

Excerpt: Welcome to the fifth volume of Best of Four. We hope you enjoy reading it as much as we have enjoyed bringing it to you. The purpose of Best of Four is to bring the best writing produced in English 004 each fall semester to the widest audience possible. Our students have important stories to tell and powerful voices to be heard. The students who read these essays will learn that they too have permission to state what is important to them in a public voice....

Contents How to Use This Magazine .............................................................................................................. 3 High School to College Andrew Makhoul ........................................................................................ 4 Ignoring Problems Creates More! Ashley Morris................................................................................ 5 Hang in There Brad Hart ................................................................................................................. 6 Nate Brandi Saveri ........................................................................................................................... 7 The Best Birthday Is the Sixteenth Brent Heimbach ......................................................................... 9 Sharing the Bread of Angels Christa Sist ......................................................................................... 10 Tragedy in the Night Danielle Gehman .......................................................................................... 11 My Grandfather David Smith ..............................................

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Understanding UFO Secrecy

By: Steven M. Greer

Over the past few years I have had the responsibility of briefing senior government and scientific leaders both in the US and abroad on the UFO/Extraterrestrial subject. The evidence regarding this subject is clear and overwhelming: It has not been difficult to make a compelling case for the reality of UFOs per se. What is a greater challenge is elucidating the architecture of secrecy related to UFOs (see the exposition of this matter contained in the paper entitled "Unacknowledged" by this author). But the greatest challenge is explaining the ‘why'. Why all the secrecy? Why a ‘black' or unacknowledged government within the government? Why hide the UFO/ET subject from public view? The ‘what' or evidence is complex but manageable. The ‘how' or nature of the secret programs is more difficult, much more complex and Byzantine. But the ‘why' - the reason behind the secrecy'- is the most challenging problem of all. There is not a single answer to this question, but rather numerous inter-related reasons for such extraordinary secrecy. Our investigations and interviews with dozens of top - secret witnesses who have been within such programs...

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The Cures for Love : Remedia Amoris: Remedia Amoris

By: Publius Ovidius Naso; Tony Kline, Translator

Ovid's help for lovers trying to escape from love.

Part I: Words with Cupid, and The Task Part II: Treat it Early: Fill Your Time with War or Law Part III: You Can Also Farm, Hunt, or Travel Part IV: But Forget Witchcraft! Part V: Contemplate her Defects Part VI: Now About Sex Part VII: Have More Than One Lover Part VIII: Be Cool With Her Part IX: Or Sate Yourself With Her Part X: Forget Her, and Don’t Be Alone Part XI: Now, Keep Away From Her Part XII: Don’t Weaken Part XIII: Get Rid of all Reminders Part XIV: Avoid the Arts Part XV: Love your Rival Part XVI: The Doctor’s Last Advice...

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Measure, For Measure

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Measure For Measure; Actus Primus -- Scena Prima -- Enter Duke, Escalus, Lords. Duke. Escalus. Esc. My Lord. Duk. Of Government, the properties to unfold, Would seeme in me t? affect speech & discourse, Since I am put to know, that your owne Science Exceedes (in that) the lists of all aduice My strength can give you: Then no more remaines But that, to your sufficiency, as your worth is able, And let them worke: The nature of our People, Our Cities Institutions, and the Termes For Common Justice, y?are as pregnant in As Art, and practise, hath inriched any That we remember: There is our Commission, From which, we would not have you warpe; call hither, I say, bid come before us Angelo: What figure of us thinke you, he will beare. For you must know, we have with speciall soule Elected him our absence to supply; Lent him our terror, drest him with our love, And given his Deputation all the Organs Of our owne powre: What thinke you of it? Esc. If any in Vienna be of worth To undergoe such ample grace, and honour, It is Lord Angelo. Enter Angelo. Duk. Looke where he comes. Ang. Alwayes obedient to your Graces will, I come to know...

Table of Contents: Measvre, For Measure, 1 -- Actus primus, Scena prima., 1 -- Scena Secunda., 3 -- Scena Tertia., 5 -- Scena Quarta., 7 -- Scena Quinta., 9 -- Actus Secundus. Scoena Prima., 11 -- Scena Secunda., 17 -- Scena Tertia., 22 -- Scena Quarta., 23 -- Actus Tertius. Scena Prima., 28 -- Actus Quartus. Scoena Prima., 40 -- Scena Secunda., 42 -- Scena Tertia., 47 -- Scena Quarta., 51 -- Scena Quinta., 52 -- Scena Sexta., 52 -- Actus Quintus. Scoena Prima., 53...

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Oscar Wilde: Art and Morality

By: Stuart Mason

“Who can help laughing when an ordinary journalist seriously proposes to limit the subject-matter at the disposal of the artist?” “We are dominated by journalism.... Journalism governs for ever and ever.” One of the nastiest of the British tabloids was founded a year too late to join in the moral panic generated to accompany Oscar Wilde’s court appearances in 1895. Yet there was no shortage of hypocritical journalists posing as moral arbiters to the nation, then as now. This compendium work - skilfully assembled by the editor, Stuart Mason - ends with transcript of Wilde’s first appearance in the Old Bailey, when he was cross-examined on the alleged immorality of his novel The Picture of Dorian Gray. The disastrous outcome of these trials provides an ironic conclusion to the earlier knockabout exchanges between Oscar and his reviewers. In these he is at his flamboyant best, revelling in the publicity he pretends to disdain. His brave performances in the dock did nothing, however, to save him from hard labour, the treadmill and complete physical and moral breakdown which the law found it necessary to inflict on him. In contrast to th...

Literature, Biography, Philosophy

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Two Paths, The

By: John Ruskin

The Two Paths is a collection of five lectures delivered in 1858 and 1859 by John Ruskin on art and architecture. This is how the author himself presents the book: The following addresses, though spoken at different times, are intentionally connected in subject; their aim being to set one or two main principles of art in simple light before the general student, and to indicate their practical bearing on modern design. The law which it has been my effort chiefly to illustrate is the dependence of all noble design, in any kind, on the sculpture or painting of Organic Form. The most famous of these, the fifth lecture, is commonly known simply as The Work of Iron (Summary by Leni)...

Art

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Measure for Measure Shakespeare

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: ACT I. SCENE I. An apartment in the DUKE?S palace. [Enter DUKE VINCENTIO, ESCALUS, Lords and Attendants.] DUKE VINCENTIO: Escalus. ESCALUS: My lord. DUKE VINCENTIO: Of government the properties to unfold, Would seem in me to affect speech and discourse; Since I am put to know that your own science Exceeds, in that, the lists of all advice My strength can give you: then no more remains, But that to your sufficiency as your Worth is able, And let them work. The nature of our people, Our city?s institutions, and the terms For common justice, you?re as pregnant in As art and practice hath enriched any That we remember....

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Introduction to SolidWorks : Second Edition

By: Mario H. Castro-Cedeno

In this book the author teaches how to use of SolidWorks as a tool for developing and presenting engineering ideas and concepts. In addition to teaching the basics of SolidWorks, he shares his experience related to how these tools are used in an engineering organization. Many introductory CAD tutorials focus only on the software and train students to be skilled CAD operators. This book also places equal emphasis on creating engineering drawings that comply with accepted design standards. Engineering drawings are the most important means of communication between the design and manufacturing functions. They are also necessary for the maintenance and repair of consumer and industrial product as varied as automobiles, airplanes, earth moving equipment and cruise ships. Lastly, engineering drawings are legal documents and commonly used to determine and apportion fault in product liability lawsuits. Every engineering and manufacturing professional must be proficient at creating, understanding and using engineering drawings. The second edition updates the book to the latest version of SolidWorks (2014)....

The reason for writing another “Introduction to SolidWorks” book is to emphasize the role and importance of computer aided design (CAD) and engineering drawings in communicating design ideas. The old adage “a picture is worth a thousand words” is true in mechanical engineering design. Sometimes it is impossible to describe a complex design in words and we must use engineering drawings. ...

The book is divided into the following five sections: 1. Introducing and Customizing SolidWorks 2. Modeling Simple Parts 3. Modeling Complex Parts 4. Modeling Assemblies 5. Creating Engineering Drawings...

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