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American Male Musical Theatre Actors (X)

       
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In the Eye of the Beholder

By: By Sharon E. Cathcart

... end, I thank my husband Jeffrey Cathcart, my dear friend Tom Westlake, and actors Gerard Butler and Earl Carpenter for inspiration. I am also grat... ...bers to prepare for the night’s performance. Overhead, I heard a beautiful male voice singing. This was not the first time: probably one of the 4... ...cs a month. I could not even hold the bank account in my name as long as a male relative was available to manage the funds for me. It was a generou... ...e out of my reach, but I had no opportunity for dining out or attending the theatre. I sighed wistfully and returned to the carriage with my small p... ...tonight. I will send a note to your cousin, and to the fools who manage my theatre. You need a night to rest.” I could see there was no arguing wit... ...e that Erik was safely away from the opera house, and presented me with the musical monkey. Madame Giry’s eye’s widened. “It is one of his most pre... ...osom like the prow of a ship. She left a calling card, and invited us to a musical evening at their home just a few nights hence. Lady Harrington ... ...y favorite recipes for madeleines and cheese crisps, and had Russian tea and American coffee on offer. The ladies came to the first one in droves, a...

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The Williams Record

By: Student Media

...gs I have a Shorthand System, easily as good as the best now taught in any American Business College, that 1 can teach In twelve (12) evenings. Tui- t... ...tiff bononi And i\cgllgrt. l)offqo«il*d variety, from $I.SO up. .-. EMPIRE THEATRE .-. 'PiuiKilny, Iiliirch 5 Hichurd C^nrli-'s Own (.lomoflinn .lohn ... ...aw in Rochester, N. Y. ^ Cbe Richmond Tdc Ulcllington north /Idams. IDass. AMERICAN & EUROPEAN PLAN E. M. Moore, Mgr. W. S, Underwood Go. it PIANOS, i... ...Ten Eyck Albany Fireproof European Plan Orchestral Concerts in Grill after Theatre and during Dinner 6.30 to B.30 o'clock Excelsior Printing Co. Harva... ...nager, J. H. Lapliaui '07; captain, C. M. Waters 'lo. Glee Club—Manager of Musical Associa- tion, C. B. Rogers "07 ; leader of mandolin club, T. K. Th... ...—Manager,]. H.Laphani '07; captain, C. M. Waters '10. Glee Club—Manager of Musical Associa- tion, C. B. Rogers "07 ; leader of mandolin club, T. K. Tl... ...localized jokes of the first part were appreciated equally by audience and actors. The "entire circle" sang the 'grand ensemble" just as the cur- tain... ... will leave tomorroow ai'ning The possibility of ns- in.r any fresliiiia!! maleriul. as was dciie la'it year, is removed by the .ru'o, passed since th... ....Songs , . - ].00 New Songs for llollege Glee Clubs . . .tlO New SonKS for Male tjuartrts - - - .BO Songsof the Unlvcrsily of Pennsylvania . l.BO Song...

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The Path of Splitness

By: Indrek Pringi

...e should he penetrate and split? Everythingness or Nothingness? He lost his male aggressiveness and confidence. As a result of his indecisiveness,... ...ch he could split all over again. In case you haven’t noticed; the Energy of male Impetus likes to penetrate things… and then go around and come ba... ...ines of mammals contain 24 vertebrae. This is why there are twelve notes on a musical scale. This is also why there are twelve meridians of the h... ...roperties of both waves and particles. This is why the main vibration of any musical note exists only as a whole, a half, and a third. This is why... ...ew lions? When there were millions of grazing animals? Why didn’t the North American natives colonize the land where millions of bison lived? It ... ...hapter Three: Summary of Hominid-Human development 205 The earliest North American cultures invented bone-tools and flint tools by themselves. B... ...ts time because it was mostly about pure meaninglessness… Super-sexy-slim actors… doing nothing but sitting around, eating pizza, drinking coffee... ...e of cleanliness? Affluent people who keep their homes spotless, go to movie theatres where they slop all of their food and drink containers onto th... ...ition of puppeteers outlasted all other Greek traditions? Why has the puppet theatre been the only ancient Greek tradition that has been handed down...

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Cyclopedia of Economics

By: Sam Vaknin

...de and supersede one's moral obligations towards non- affiliated humans. Thus, an American's moral obligation to safeguard the lives of American f... ...igation to save the lives of innocent civilians, however numerous, if they are not Americans. The larger the number of positive self-definitions I ... ...nd the ability to feel pain? Historically, philosophers like Kant (and Descartes, Malebranche, and Aquinas) rejected the idea of animal rights. Th... ...sitizes us to human suffering and makes us more prone to using violence on humans. Malebranche augmented this line of thinking by "proving" that an... ...iving them copies of it without "eroding" the original. We shed tears in the movie theatre because the director succeeded to replicate an emotion i... ...pts and tenets. Consider this sample of outstanding issues: Unlike other economic actors and agents, governments are accorded a special status and... ... is nothing morally wrong with this. Some people get to sit in the front rows of a theatre, or to travel in luxury, or to receive superior medical ... ...ists (like musicians) - often describe their interpretation of an artwork (e.g., a musical piece) in terms of this type of intuition. Many mathemat... ...nt individualism play an important socio-cultural role in this semipternal game of musical chairs. Many products have a limited shelf life or an ex...

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Cyclopedia of Philosophy

By: Sam Vaknin

...de and supersede one's moral obligations towards non- affiliated humans. Thus, an American's moral obligation to safeguard the lives of American f... ...igation to save the lives of innocent civilians, however numerous, if they are not Americans. The larger the number of positive self-definitions I ... ...nd the ability to feel pain? Historically, philosophers like Kant (and Descartes, Malebranche, and Aquinas) rejected the idea of animal rights. Th... ...sitizes us to human suffering and makes us more prone to using violence on humans. Malebranche augmented this line of thinking by "proving" that an... ...iving them copies of it without "eroding" the original. We shed tears in the movie theatre because the director succeeded to replicate an emotion i... ...pts and tenets. Consider this sample of outstanding issues: Unlike other economic actors and agents, governments are accorded a special status and... ... is nothing morally wrong with this. Some people get to sit in the front rows of a theatre, or to travel in luxury, or to receive superior medical ... ...ists (like musicians) - often describe their interpretation of an artwork (e.g., a musical piece) in terms of this type of intuition. Many mathemat... ...nt individualism play an important socio-cultural role in this semipternal game of musical chairs. Many products have a limited shelf life or an ex...

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Heroes of Unknown Seas and Savage Lands

By: J. W. Buel

...- Adventures in the New World -- The first white man that ever set foot on the American continent -- Killing of Thorwald by natives -- His last instru... ...- Snakes and crocodiles -- The return to France -- Bougainville in the war for American independence 415- 422 CHAPTER XL. A Brief Biography of Captain... ...breeze, and when the breeze is blowing will curse the whistlers, lest by their musical efforts a storm should, be provoked. He will not tell the numbe... ...ieved that the travellers heard strange whisperings in the air and concerts of musical instruments, and the drums and noises of armies, which so disco... ...emale of which is superstitiously believed to lay her eggs on the back of the male who flies about with them until they are hatched; he watched the p... ...s usually their custom. As soon as they occupied the city, they seized all the male population and locked them Tip in the churches, then issued a proc... ...s that such a performance would have met with universal applause on a European theatre; and it so far exceeded any attempt we had made to entertain th... ... possible to distinguish the different movements; though one might suppose the actors were now almost tired, as their performance had lasted nearly ha... ...ek, not unlike what is sometimes practised in the comic dances on our European theatres. They formed the triple semi-circle as the preceding dancers h...

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Listen with Your Heart

By: Barbara Scott

...mary Donnelly Listen With Your Heart 5 Prologue The Victoria Theatre, Dayton, Ohio, 1866 He’s out! Finished. ... ...ght, his audience would clamor for a refund. And the shame of the Victoria Theatre presenting a magician who could not pull a scarf out of his sleev... ...Halverson’s new minstrel show which folded two nights after opening, of the musical pantomime Schwann had in rehearsal lampooning Boss Tweed and Tam... ...ing as he crashed against it. “No, Daniel! It’s not...” she heard another male voice call out. “Don’t stop him. Let him save her. It may be jus... ...bout making the arrangements already. We believe if you were married to an American citizen— “ He exploded. “Married? You must be mad. I’ve bar... ...t been?” “My name is Falkner. And I’ve been here long enough to know how Americans treat intruders.” The man was as tall as Daniel, and block s... ...to step into the role. The director and the crew were on payroll, half the actors on contract, just waitin’ for Helene. I dragged my feet cancelli... ... “Specifically, Danny, the female audience should want to identify, and the male audience should want to ravish. Morgan has the aptitude to send ev...

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American Notes for General Circulation

By: Charles Dickens

...tion by Charles Dickens A publication of PSU s Electronic Classics Series American Notes for General Circulation by Charles Dickens is a publicati... ...in the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. American Notes for General Circulation by Charles Dickens , the Pennsylvan... ...rom its roof. In the gallery opposite to the pulpit were a little choir of male and female singers, a violoncello, and a violin. The preacher already ... ...ich a half grown Duke of Clarence might be smothered easily. There are two theatres in Boston, of good size and construction, but sadly in want of pat... ...hat all the great sights are somewhere else. If a lady take a fancy to any male passenger’s seat, the gentleman who accompanies her gives him notice o... ...tes – Dickens 94 hotel with stores about its base, like some Continental theatre, or the London Opera House shorn of its colon nade, plunge into th... ...el discussions upon the same themes, in connection with Shakspeare and the Musical Glasses, of which we read in the Vicar of Wakefield. Near the city,... ...ding? On every side. Every session had its anecdotes of that kind, and the actors were all there. Did I recognise in this assembly, a body of men, who... ...f the mixing of cool liquors: but they were a merrier people here, and had musical instruments playing to them o’ nights, which it was a treat to hear...

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The Ambassadors

By: Henry James

... of “The Ambassadors,” which first appeared in twelve numbers of The North American Review (1903) and was published as a whole the same year. The situ... ...“arranged for”; its first appearance was from month to month, in the North American Review during 1903, and I had been open from far back to any pleas... ...hort stay in London; an evening spent by Miss Gostrey’s side at one of the theatres, to which he had found himself transported, without his own hand r... ...d raised, on the mere expression of a conscientious won- der. She knew her theatre, she knew her play, as she had triumphantly known, three days runni... ...sh life. He had distracted drops in which he couldn’t have said if it were actors or auditors who were most true, and the upshot of which, each time, ... ...hat matter, it had begun to seem to him that there must only have been the male and the female. These made two exactly, even with the individual varie... ...ut of it, with his “home,” as Strether figured the place, in the Boulevard Malesherbes; which was perhaps why, re- pairing, not to fail of justice eit... ...em. It might have been, on analysis, nothing more than Shakespeare and the musical glasses; but it had served all the purpose of his appearing to have...

...Excerpt: Volume I. Preface: Nothing is more easy than to state the subject of ?The Ambassadors,? which first appeared in twelve numbers of The North American Review (1903) and was published as a whole the same year. The situation involved is gathered up betimes, that is in the second chapter of Book Fifth, for the reader?s benefit, into as few words as possible-- planted ...

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Autobiographic Sketches Selections, Grave and Gay

By: Thomas de Quincey

...iversity. Contents EXTRACT FROM A LETTER WRITTEN BY MR. DE QUINCEY TO THE AMERICAN EDITOR OF THIS WORKS. ............................................... ...secondly, in having made me a participator in the pecuniary profits of the American edition, without solicita- tion or the shadow of any expectation o... ... single case of the class is sufficient to throw open before you the whole theatre of possibilities in that direction. I never heard that the woman ac... ...an away,—a slight jar was thus given to the else triumphal effect of these musical ovations. Once having ut- tered my protest, however, willingly I ga... ...f a real uncounterfeit sympathy. I have mentioned already that we had four male guard- ians, (a fifth being my mother.) These four were B., E., G., an... ...was a family of amiable children, who were more skilfully trained in their musical studies than at that day was usual. They sang the old English glees... ...better sung; but at that time I needed nothing better. It was sung by four male voices, and rose into a region of thrilling pas- sion, such as my hear... ... the composition of a casual and chance auditory, whether in a street or a theatre,—secondly, the small size of a modern audience, even in Drury Lane,... ...e knights were to be attended by adults; and thus, from being partakers as actors, 196 Thomas de Quincey my friend and I became simple spectators of ...

...Contents EXTRACT FROM A LETTER WRITTEN BY MR. DE QUINCEY TO THE AMERICAN EDITOR OF THIS WORKS. ...................................................................................................... 4 PREFACE TO THE ENGLISH EDITION .............................................................

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The Reef

By: Edith Wharton

...h other again, in London, some three months previously, at a dinner at the American Embassy, and when she had caught sight of him her smile had been l... .... Her husband had struck him as a characteristic speci- men of the kind of American as to whom one is not quite clear whether he lives in Europe in or... ...cy) a deeper feeling of communion, and their days there had been like some musical prelude, where the instruments, breathing low, seem to hold back th... ...devotion, set apart for some inevitable hour; and the last evening, at the theatre, between the overshadowing Marquise and the unsuspicious Owen, they... ... was false from head to foot!” “False—?” In spite of time and satiety, the male instinct of ownership rose up and repudiated the charge. Miss Viner ca... ...ersons with tastes and perceptions like his own, to whom an evening at the theatre was an unat- tainable indulgence. There floated through his mind an... ...almost certainly” an anarchist. It was this nucleus, and its outer ring of musical, architectural and other American students, which posed successivel... ...to the veins of the moribund art. He had the impression that the ghosts of actors were giv- ing a spectral performance on the shores of Styx. Certainl... ...ace, at the same moment, underwent the same change, shrinking into a small malevolent white mask in which the eyes burned black. “Thank you—thank you ...

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Pictures from Italy

By: Charles Dickens

...e shoe makers. The whole place looks as if it were the stage of some great theatre, and the curtain had just run up, for a picturesque ballet. And the... ...ONS of such a place as Albaro, the suburb of Genoa, where I am now, as my American friends would say, ‘located,’ can hardly fail, I should imagine, t... ... from the heat of the fire, and where the brave Courier plays all sorts of musical instruments of his own manufacture, all the evening long. A mighty ... ...t of Faith, are very commonly seen walking in the streets. There are three theatres in the city, besides an old one now rarely opened. The most import... ...ait for an opportu nity to hiss, and spare the actresses as little as the actors. But, as there is nothing else of a public nature at which they are ... ...y by the Jura mountains, sprinkled with snow, and lighted by the moon, and musical with falling water, was delightful; or how, below the windows of th... ...sed to view a little wooden doll, in face very like General Tom Thumb, the American Dwarf: gorgeously dressed in satin and gold lace, and actually bla... ...tared at again, without let or hindrance. The body of the room was full of male strangers; the crowd immense; the heat very great; and the pressure so... ...s to remind them that he took the money. The majority were country people, male and female. There were four or five Jesuit priests, however, and some ...

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The Note Book of an English Opium-Eater

By: Thomas de Quincey

...ge line of sea-board (stretching through twenty-four hundred miles) of the American United States; may enjoy fifty years for lei- surely repentance; a... ...ose. But what the world knows Wieland by is his ‘Oberon.’ Now in this gay, musical romance of Sir Huon and his enchanted horn, with its gleams of volu... ...are quoted or alluded to by Addison. Even these quotations he had from the theatre, or the breath of popular talk. Generally, if you see a line from S... ...e sections) to cite before the reader’s eye the chief pomps of the Grecian theatre, after invoking ‘the magnificent witch’ Medea, I call up Antigone t... ... of dramatically representing an impassioned tale, by means of dancing, of musical ac- companiment in the orchestra, and of elaborate pantomime in the... ... that, as the chorus sometimes intermingles too much in the action, so the actors sometimes intermingle in the business of the chorus. Now, when you a... ...e maternal ancestors of the present Wellesleys. Garret Wellesley, the last male heir of the direct line, in the year 1745, left his whole estate to on... ... well known upon that coast; and ‘faults’ may be a flash term for what the Americans call ‘notions.’ A part of the cargo it clearly is; and one is not... ... by persons who were not merely contemporary with the great civil war, but actors and even leaders in its principal scenes—there is hardly one which d...

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Memorials and Other Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

................................................... 4 FROM THE AUTHOR, TO THE AMERICAN EDITOR OF HIS WORKS. ................................................ ...condly, in hav- ing made me a participator in the pecuniary profits of the American edition, without solicitation or the shadow of any expectation on ... ...of the mail, was transformed into a dream, as tumultuous and changing as a musical fugue. This troubled Dream is circumstantially reported in Section ... ...ment) with respect to the fictitious character of the incidents and of the actors in that famous tale. Mere accident it was that had intercepted those... ...ong by a babble of impossible forms, as fantastic as any that our Lon- don theatres have traditionally ascribed to English rustics, to English sailors... ...pital disadvantage, in my eyes, that its chapel possessed no organ, and no musical ser- vice. But any other choice would have driven me to an in- stan... ...e to modifi- cation from personal qualities, inasmuch as there is no great theatre (as with us) for individual display. Forensic eloquence is unknown ... ...r with the numerous chapels erected in it to different saints by devotees, male or female, in the families of forgotten Landgraves through four centur... ...h a marriage went to incapacitate the children who might be born under it, male or female, from succeeding. On that account, as well as because curren...

...ience I had found from nervous depression to be absolutely insurmountable; secondly, in having made me a participator in the pecuniary profits of the American edition, without solicitation or the shadow of any expectation on my part, without any legal claim that I could plead, or equitable warrant in established usage, solely and merely upon your own spontaneous motion. So...

...HER PAPERS, VOL. I. ....................................................................................................... 4 FROM THE AUTHOR, TO THE AMERICAN EDITOR OF HIS WORKS. .......................................................... 4 EXPLANATORY NOTICES......................................................................................................................

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Mens Wives

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

..., looking at the fashions, or reading 4 Men’s Wives Cumberland’s “British Theatre.” The Sunday Times was her paper, for she voted the Dispatch, that ... ...ry one of the roulades, flourishes, and ornaments as she heard them at the theatres by Mrs. Humby, Mrs. Waylett, or Madame V estris. The girl had a fi... ...nfluence of great men; he was an agent for half-a-dozen theatrical people, male 13 Thackeray and female, and had the interests of the latter especial... ... world, from Bond Street to Bread Street; he knew all the authors, all the actors, all the “notorieties” of the town, and the private histo- ries of e... ...to me, considering these things, it seemed that there were a hundred other male brutes squatted round about, and treated just as reasonably as Bottom ... ... it, depend upon it: it is a sad life, a poor pastime. Mr. Dickens, in his American book, tells of the prisoners at the silent prison, how they had or... ...d a prodi- gious quantity of her time and energy on the cultivation of her musical talent; and having, as before stated, a very fine loud voice, speed... ... genius in his profession. This gentleman, then, undertook to complete the musical edu- cation of Mrs. Walker. He expressed himself at once 52 Men’s ...

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Notes on a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cairo

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...wing and reading, and the blind were, for the most part, set to perform on musical instruments, and got up a con- cert for the visitors. It was then w... ...ible, that even as blind beggars they could hardly get a livelihood in the musical way. 15 Thackeray HENCE WE WERE DRIVEN to the huge palace of Neces... ...have never witnessed before. And the effect of the groups of multitudinous actors in this busy cheerful drama is heightened, as it were, by the decora... ... despise such a homely ornament. I have got a map with squares, fountains, theatres, public gar- dens, and Places d’Othon marked out; but they only ex... ...ty which will only bear to be looked at from a distance, like a scene in a theatre. What is the most beautiful nose in the world, if it be covered wit... ...e moored everywhere, showing their flags, Rus- sian and English, Austrian, American, and Greek; and along the quays country ships from the Black Sea o... ...as en- deavouring to get the likeness of one or two of these comfort- able malefactors. One old and wrinkled she-criminal, whom I had selected on acco... ...issaries, with silver maces shining in the sun. ’Twas the party of the new American Consul-General of Syria and Jerusalem, hastening to that city, wit... ...th. Hard by was Rebecca’s Well: a dead body was lying there, and crowds of male and female mourners dancing and howling round it. Now and then a littl...

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Aaron's Rod

By: D. H. Lawrence

...cks was very red, the mangle with its put-up board was white-scrubbed, the American oil-cloth on the table had a gay pattern, there was a warm fire, t... ...ritish Government,” and “bad for the people—good for the people,” made him malevolently angry. The doctor was nonplussed for a moment. Then he gath- ... ...o quiet, they had the dangerous impassivity of the Bohemian, Pari- sian or American rather than English. “Cigarette, Julia?” said Robert to his wife. ... ...s something like the keyboard of a piano: more still, like a succession of musical notes. For the rectangular planes of light were of different intens... ...high- pitched, sing-song voice and her hurried laugh could be heard in the theatre. She twisted a beautiful little fan that a dead artist had given he... ...king. The noise was strange and rattling. What a curious multiple object a theatre-audience was! It seemed to have a million heads, a million hands, a... ... can’t stand it that Robert offers to hand her into the taxi.” He gave his malevolent grin round the company, then went out. He did not reappear for t... ...HE OPERA SEASON ENDED, Aaron was invited by Cyril Scott to join a group of musical people in a village by the sea. He accepted, and spent a pleasant m... ...arily and cleared his throat. All four started to compose themselves, like actors going on the stage, outside that library door. And then Arthur softl...

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The Uncommercial Traveller

By: Charles Dickens

...ered by a most intelli- gent master. I remarked in it, an instance of the collateral harm that obstinate vanity and folly can do. ‘This was the Hall w... ...th masons, sir, and I make him the sign continually; but, because I am in this unfortunate position, sir, he won’t give me the counter-sign!’ CHAPTER ... ...nt re- duced condition it bears a thaw almost worse than any place I know. It gets so dreadfully low-spirited when damp breaks forth. Those wonderful ... ...dems and robes of kings are made. I noticed that some shops which had once been in the dramatic line, and had struggled out of it, were not getting on... ...hed as rear- guard. Sharp-eye, I soon had occasion to remark, had a skil- ful and quite professional way of opening doors—touched latches delicately, ... ... waiting for Jack. Now, it was a crouch- ing old woman, like the picture of the Norwood Gipsy in the old sixpenny dream-books; now, it was a crimp of ... ...g come but the jug of ale and the bread, you implore your waiter to ‘see after that cutlet, waiter; pray do!’ He cannot go at once, for he is carrying... ...e hostelry which no man possessed of a penny was ever known to pass in warm weather. Before its entrance, are certain pleasant, trimmed limes; likewis... ...as already in the un- commercial line. This was a man who, though not more than thirty, had seen the world in divers irreconcilable capacities—had bee...

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In the South Seas

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...there dwelt an old, melancholy, grizzled man of the name of Tari (Charlie) Coffin. He was a native of Oahu, in the Sandwich Islands; and had gone to s... ...id, is uppermost in the mind of the Marquesan. It would be strange if it were oth- erwise. The race is perhaps the handsomest extant. Six feet is abou... ...ey of Hapaa, known to readers of Herman Melville under the grotesque misspell- ing of Hapar. There are but two writers who have touched the South Seas... ...tted. They must not sit on the paepae; they must not go up to it by the stair; they must not eat pork; they must not approach a boat; they must not co... ...both of these feasters and their meat; he clapped his hands, and gave me a stave of one of the old, ill-omened choruses. Centuries might have come and... ... above upon a woody valley: a little French fort, now disused and deserted, over- hangs the valley and the inlet. Atuona itself, at the head of the ne... ...icety of his inflections, the elegance of his gestures, and the fine play of his ex- pression, told us that. We, meanwhile, sat like aliens in a playh... ...ucted, or seem- ing so by contrast. There was much variety of measure, and towards the end of each piece, when the fun became fast and furious, a reco... ... fled; and when at length the leader found the wit or the author- ity to get his troop in motion and revive the singing, it was with much diminished f...

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A Little Tour in France

By: Henry James

... university. 3 Henry James A Little Tour In France by Henry James WE GOOD AMERICANS—I say it without presumption—are too apt to think that France is ... ... of civiliza- tion which stretches from the Arc de Triomphe to the Gymnase theatre. It had already been intimated to the author of these light pages t... ...ved with gold figures; and each of them looks more like the royal box at a theatre than like the aperture of a palace dark with memories. For all this... ... of old furniture, as all apartments should be through which the insatiate American wanders in the rear of a bored domestic, pausing to stare at a fad... ...e to me in the compartment were a couple of figures almost as vivid as the actors in the “Comedie Humaine.” One of these was a very genial and dirty o... ... several weeks in the French provinces I rarely encountered a well-dressed male. Can it be possible the republics are unfavorable to a certain attenti... ...ountered enough specimens to justify an induction. But there were very few males in the streets, and the place presented no appearance of activity. He... ... place is a proof of extraordinary power of voice on the part of the Roman actors. It was after we had spent half an hour in the moonshine at the aren... ...ectory) dur- ing which the treasure could not be shown. The purpose of the musical chimes to which I had so artlessly listened was to usher in this fr...

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