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American Male Musical Theatre Actors (X) Literature (X)

       
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In the Eye of the Beholder

By: By Sharon E. Cathcart

... end, I thank my husband Jeffrey Cathcart, my dear friend Tom Westlake, and actors Gerard Butler and Earl Carpenter for inspiration. I am also grat... ...bers to prepare for the night’s performance. Overhead, I heard a beautiful male voice singing. This was not the first time: probably one of the 4... ...cs a month. I could not even hold the bank account in my name as long as a male relative was available to manage the funds for me. It was a generou... ...e out of my reach, but I had no opportunity for dining out or attending the theatre. I sighed wistfully and returned to the carriage with my small p... ...tonight. I will send a note to your cousin, and to the fools who manage my theatre. You need a night to rest.” I could see there was no arguing wit... ...e that Erik was safely away from the opera house, and presented me with the musical monkey. Madame Giry’s eye’s widened. “It is one of his most pre... ...osom like the prow of a ship. She left a calling card, and invited us to a musical evening at their home just a few nights hence. Lady Harrington ... ...y favorite recipes for madeleines and cheese crisps, and had Russian tea and American coffee on offer. The ladies came to the first one in droves, a...

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The Reef

By: Edith Wharton

...h other again, in London, some three months previously, at a dinner at the American Embassy, and when she had caught sight of him her smile had been l... .... Her husband had struck him as a characteristic speci- men of the kind of American as to whom one is not quite clear whether he lives in Europe in or... ...cy) a deeper feeling of communion, and their days there had been like some musical prelude, where the instruments, breathing low, seem to hold back th... ...devotion, set apart for some inevitable hour; and the last evening, at the theatre, between the overshadowing Marquise and the unsuspicious Owen, they... ... was false from head to foot!” “False—?” In spite of time and satiety, the male instinct of ownership rose up and repudiated the charge. Miss Viner ca... ...ersons with tastes and perceptions like his own, to whom an evening at the theatre was an unat- tainable indulgence. There floated through his mind an... ...almost certainly” an anarchist. It was this nucleus, and its outer ring of musical, architectural and other American students, which posed successivel... ...to the veins of the moribund art. He had the impression that the ghosts of actors were giv- ing a spectral performance on the shores of Styx. Certainl... ...ace, at the same moment, underwent the same change, shrinking into a small malevolent white mask in which the eyes burned black. “Thank you—thank you ...

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Mens Wives

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

..., looking at the fashions, or reading 4 Men’s Wives Cumberland’s “British Theatre.” The Sunday Times was her paper, for she voted the Dispatch, that ... ...ry one of the roulades, flourishes, and ornaments as she heard them at the theatres by Mrs. Humby, Mrs. Waylett, or Madame V estris. The girl had a fi... ...nfluence of great men; he was an agent for half-a-dozen theatrical people, male 13 Thackeray and female, and had the interests of the latter especial... ... world, from Bond Street to Bread Street; he knew all the authors, all the actors, all the “notorieties” of the town, and the private histo- ries of e... ...to me, considering these things, it seemed that there were a hundred other male brutes squatted round about, and treated just as reasonably as Bottom ... ... it, depend upon it: it is a sad life, a poor pastime. Mr. Dickens, in his American book, tells of the prisoners at the silent prison, how they had or... ...d a prodi- gious quantity of her time and energy on the cultivation of her musical talent; and having, as before stated, a very fine loud voice, speed... ... genius in his profession. This gentleman, then, undertook to complete the musical edu- cation of Mrs. Walker. He expressed himself at once 52 Men’s ...

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Notes on a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cairo

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...wing and reading, and the blind were, for the most part, set to perform on musical instruments, and got up a con- cert for the visitors. It was then w... ...ible, that even as blind beggars they could hardly get a livelihood in the musical way. 15 Thackeray HENCE WE WERE DRIVEN to the huge palace of Neces... ...have never witnessed before. And the effect of the groups of multitudinous actors in this busy cheerful drama is heightened, as it were, by the decora... ... despise such a homely ornament. I have got a map with squares, fountains, theatres, public gar- dens, and Places d’Othon marked out; but they only ex... ...ty which will only bear to be looked at from a distance, like a scene in a theatre. What is the most beautiful nose in the world, if it be covered wit... ...e moored everywhere, showing their flags, Rus- sian and English, Austrian, American, and Greek; and along the quays country ships from the Black Sea o... ...as en- deavouring to get the likeness of one or two of these comfort- able malefactors. One old and wrinkled she-criminal, whom I had selected on acco... ...issaries, with silver maces shining in the sun. ’Twas the party of the new American Consul-General of Syria and Jerusalem, hastening to that city, wit... ...th. Hard by was Rebecca’s Well: a dead body was lying there, and crowds of male and female mourners dancing and howling round it. Now and then a littl...

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Babbitt

By: Sinclair Lewis

...gh to endure the search for a B.V.D. undershirt which had, he pointed out, malevolently been concealed among his clean pajamas. He was fairly amiable ... ...lin Avenue & 3d St., N.E Zenith Omar Gribble, Esq., 376 North American Building, Zenith. Dear Mr. Gribble: Your letter of the twentieth t... ... given to oratory and to chumminess with the arts. He called on the famous actors and vaudeville artists when they came to town, gave them cigars, add... ...at the Climax Vaudeville Theater this week cer- tainly are a slick pair of actors.” Babbitt, though ordi- narily his voice was the surest and most epi... ...ompson, the old-fashioned, lean Yankee, rugged, traditional, stage type of American business man, and Babbitt, the plump, smooth, efficient, up-to-the... ...ed into a raging hostess, she took care of the house and didn’t bother the males by thinking. She went on firmly: “It sounds awful to me, the way they... ...an advertisement which he read aloud, to applause and laughter: Old Colony Theatre Shake the Old Dogs to the Wrollicking Wrens The bonniest bevy of be... ...were bringing folding chairs up from the basement. There was an impressive musical program, conducted by Sheldon Smeeth, educational di- rector of the... ...ck around with me, old man, and I’ll show you a good time!” They went to a musical comedy and nudged each other 212 Babbitt at the matrimonial jokes ...

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The Pit a Story of Chicago

By: Frank Norris

...tion to (I) the production, (2) the distribution, (3) the consump- tion of American wheat. When complete, they will form the story of a crop of wheat ... ...rris I I I I I AT EIGHT O’CLOCK in the inner vestibule of the Audito- rium Theatre by the window of the box office, Laura Dearborn, her younger sister... ...ter Page, and their aunt—Aunt Wess’—were still waiting for the rest of the theatre-party to appear. A great, slow-moving press of men and women in eve... ... wear them after all. My poor little flowers.” But she showed him a single American Beauty, pinned to the shoulder of her gown beneath her cape. “Yes,... ...ut the ship about. Jadwin having criticised the effect because none of the actors turned with it, was voted a Philistine by Mrs. Cressler and Corthell... ...n exhilaration. Beneath that boyish exterior was the tough coarseness, the male hardness, the callous- ness that met the brunt and withstood the shock... ...s full of yellow envelopes. From the telephone alcoves came the prolonged, musical rasp of the call bells. In the Western Union booths the keys of the... ...e posed as a task- master, relentless, never pleased, hustling the amateur actors about without ceremony, scolding and brow-beat- ing. He was a small,... ...elodrama. She had a taste for the magnificent. She revelled in these great musical “effects” upon her organ, the grandiose eas- ily appealed to her, w...

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Diana of the Crossways

By: George Meredith

...raglio Point: they have not yet doubled Cape T urk.’ It is war, and on the male side, Ottoman war: her experi- ence reduced her to think so positively... ...he strings of sensualism,’ to the delight of a world gaping for marvels of musical execution rather than for music. For our world is all but a sensati... ...as in the first conception of the edifice, backs were damp, boots liquidly musical, the pipe of consolation smoked with difficulty, with much pulling ... ...ND OF WHAT THEY LED TO A FORTNIGHT after this memorable Ball the principal actors of both sexes had crossed the Channel back to England, and old Irela... ...lood. There were, one hears that there still are, remnants of the pristine male, who, if resisted in their suing, conclude that they are scorned, and ... ...e worked for my bread. I had thoughts of America. I fancy I can write; and Americans, one hears, are gentle to women.’ ‘Ah, Tony! there’s the looking ... ... inducement she had received to embark her money in this Company: a South- American mine, collapsed almost within hearing of the trum- pets of prospec... ...when celebrated impressively, it seemed. ‘Tony calls the social world “the theatre of appetites,” as 323 George Meredith we have it at present,’ she ... ...r drencher. But a pretty woman in a right-down ter- magant passion is good theatre; because it can’t last, at that pace; and you’re sure of your agree...

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Nostromo a Tale of the Seaboard

By: Joseph Conrad

...ume picked up outside a second-hand book-shop. It was the life story of an American sea- man written by himself with the assistance of a jour- nalist.... ...os—the “beautiful Antonia.” Whether she is a possible varia- tion of Latin-American girlhood I wouldn’t dare to affirm. But, for me, she is. Always a ... ... earnest. It is scream- ingly funny, the blood flows all the time, and the actors believe themselves to be influencing the fate of the universe. Of co... ...time for extending a modest man’s business. He enveloped in a swift mental maledic- tion the whole country, with all its inhabitants, par- tisans of R... ...ith repressive severity till the adverse course of events upon the distant theatre of civil war forced upon him the reflection that, after all, the gr... ...as clear. It would be of no use to him—alone. He could do nothing with it. Malediction! The doctor would never come out. He was probably under arrest ... ...ased the earthenware filter in the corner of the kitchen kept on its swift musical drip, drip into the great porous jar below. Towards sunset he got u...

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The Blithedale Romance

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

...therwise iden tical with it. She was dressed as simply as possible, in an American print (I think the dry goods people call it so), but with a silken... ...ing of France’s kitchen; my evening at the billiard club, the concert, the theatre, or at somebody’s party, if I pleased,—what could be better than al... ...e so happy, especially a feminine creature.” “They are always happier than male creatures,” said I. “You must correct that opinion, Mr. Coverdale,” re... ...ible that, while these three charac ters figured so largely on my private theatre, I—though prob ably reckoned as a friend by all—was at best but a ... ...ating them from other relations, had kept so long upon my mental stage, as actors in a drama. In itself, perhaps, it was no very remark 123 Hawthorn... ... fall 133 Hawthorne in love with Priscilla. In society, indeed, a genuine American never dreams of stepping across the inappreciable air line which s... ... steps up the staircase. There was a pause on the landing place. A lady’s musical yet haughty accents were heard mak ing an inquiry from some denize... ...voices and much laughter proceeding from the interior of the wood. Voices, male and feminine; laughter, not only of fresh young throats, but the bass ...

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Vanity Fair

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...ereal pavilion, and only woke up with a smile when George arrived from the theatre. For the next day, George had more important “business” to 8 V ani... ...g was there to fill with delight that great gourmand of a Jos: there was a theatre where a miraculous Catalani was delighting all hearers: beautiful r... ...versation. This is a species of dignity in which the high-bred British fe- male reigns supreme. To watch the behaviour of a fine lady to other and hum... ..., and fresh news began to arrive from the war, brought by men who had been actors in the scene. Wagons and long country carts laden with wounded came ... ...ace all the females of the establishment in mourning; and desired that the male servants should be similarly attired in deep black. All parties and en... ...irit enough to bustle about for “a few select inmates to join a cheer- ful musical family,” such as one reads of in the Times. She was content to lie ... ...iscomfiture of Miss Horrocks. He thrummed on the table as if it had been a musical instrument, and squalled in imitation of her manner of singing. He ... ...wether. There was Mr. John Paul Jefferson Jones, titularly attached to the American Embassy and correspondent of the New Y ork Demagogue, who, by way ... ...o well? Finally, the procession being formed in the order described by the American diplomatist, they marched into the apartment where the banquet was...

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Life of John Coleridge Patteson : Missionary Bishop of the Melanesian Islands

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...here was a mixture of the utile with the dulce. Our constant visits to the theatre were strong incentives to a preparatory study of the plays of Goeth... ...of Goethe, Schiller, and Lessing. What noble acting we saw in that Dresden theatre! ‘With regard to the opera, I have never seen Weber or Meyerbeer’s ... ...anner of saying the prayers was exceedingly good: his voice very sweet and musical; without seeming loud, it was fully audible, and gave assurance of ... ...expeditions; but of late whalers and sandal wood traders, both English and American, had been finding their way among them, and too often acting as ir... ...it to-day, and had a long talk with the physician and surgeon, and saw the male pa- tients, two of them natives. One of them is dying, and so I am to ... ...haps: two or three faint female voices, two or three rough most discordant male voices, all the attempt at singing. No instrument of any kind. The bur... ...in those private classes that he exercised such wonderful in- fluence; his musical voice, his holy face, his gentle manner, all helping doubtless to i... ...e the chief obstacle to the Mission. After describing an interview with an American captain, he continues:—’Reports are rife of a semi-legalised slave... ...s streaming down his face and back all the time. A great point is that the actors should not be recognised. Mr. Brooke was likewise dropped at Florida...

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Autobiographic Sketches Selections, Grave and Gay

By: Thomas de Quincey

...iversity. Contents EXTRACT FROM A LETTER WRITTEN BY MR. DE QUINCEY TO THE AMERICAN EDITOR OF THIS WORKS. ............................................... ...secondly, in having made me a participator in the pecuniary profits of the American edition, without solicita- tion or the shadow of any expectation o... ... single case of the class is sufficient to throw open before you the whole theatre of possibilities in that direction. I never heard that the woman ac... ...an away,—a slight jar was thus given to the else triumphal effect of these musical ovations. Once having ut- tered my protest, however, willingly I ga... ...f a real uncounterfeit sympathy. I have mentioned already that we had four male guard- ians, (a fifth being my mother.) These four were B., E., G., an... ...was a family of amiable children, who were more skilfully trained in their musical studies than at that day was usual. They sang the old English glees... ...better sung; but at that time I needed nothing better. It was sung by four male voices, and rose into a region of thrilling pas- sion, such as my hear... ... the composition of a casual and chance auditory, whether in a street or a theatre,—secondly, the small size of a modern audience, even in Drury Lane,... ...e knights were to be attended by adults; and thus, from being partakers as actors, 196 Thomas de Quincey my friend and I became simple spectators of ...

...Contents EXTRACT FROM A LETTER WRITTEN BY MR. DE QUINCEY TO THE AMERICAN EDITOR OF THIS WORKS. ...................................................................................................... 4 PREFACE TO THE ENGLISH EDITION .............................................................

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The Uncommercial Traveller

By: Charles Dickens

...ered by a most intelli- gent master. I remarked in it, an instance of the collateral harm that obstinate vanity and folly can do. ‘This was the Hall w... ...th masons, sir, and I make him the sign continually; but, because I am in this unfortunate position, sir, he won’t give me the counter-sign!’ CHAPTER ... ...nt re- duced condition it bears a thaw almost worse than any place I know. It gets so dreadfully low-spirited when damp breaks forth. Those wonderful ... ...dems and robes of kings are made. I noticed that some shops which had once been in the dramatic line, and had struggled out of it, were not getting on... ...hed as rear- guard. Sharp-eye, I soon had occasion to remark, had a skil- ful and quite professional way of opening doors—touched latches delicately, ... ... waiting for Jack. Now, it was a crouch- ing old woman, like the picture of the Norwood Gipsy in the old sixpenny dream-books; now, it was a crimp of ... ...g come but the jug of ale and the bread, you implore your waiter to ‘see after that cutlet, waiter; pray do!’ He cannot go at once, for he is carrying... ...e hostelry which no man possessed of a penny was ever known to pass in warm weather. Before its entrance, are certain pleasant, trimmed limes; likewis... ...as already in the un- commercial line. This was a man who, though not more than thirty, had seen the world in divers irreconcilable capacities—had bee...

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A Little Tour in France

By: Henry James

... university. 3 Henry James A Little Tour In France by Henry James WE GOOD AMERICANS—I say it without presumption—are too apt to think that France is ... ... of civiliza- tion which stretches from the Arc de Triomphe to the Gymnase theatre. It had already been intimated to the author of these light pages t... ...ved with gold figures; and each of them looks more like the royal box at a theatre than like the aperture of a palace dark with memories. For all this... ... of old furniture, as all apartments should be through which the insatiate American wanders in the rear of a bored domestic, pausing to stare at a fad... ...e to me in the compartment were a couple of figures almost as vivid as the actors in the “Comedie Humaine.” One of these was a very genial and dirty o... ... several weeks in the French provinces I rarely encountered a well-dressed male. Can it be possible the republics are unfavorable to a certain attenti... ...ountered enough specimens to justify an induction. But there were very few males in the streets, and the place presented no appearance of activity. He... ... place is a proof of extraordinary power of voice on the part of the Roman actors. It was after we had spent half an hour in the moonshine at the aren... ...ectory) dur- ing which the treasure could not be shown. The purpose of the musical chimes to which I had so artlessly listened was to usher in this fr...

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The English Mail-Coach and Joan of Arc

By: Thomas de Quincey

...clipse, we entered at least the skirts of its penumbra. And the analogy of theatres was valid against us,—where no man can complain of the annoyances ... ...e boxes. But the soundness of this analogy we disputed. In the case of the theatre, it cannot be pretended that the inferior situations have any separ... ...d* miles— *“Three hundred”:—Of necessity, this scale of measurement, to an American, if he happens to be a thoughtless man, must sound ludicrous. Acco... ...less man, must sound ludicrous. Accordingly, I remember a case in which an American writer indulges himself in the luxury of a little fibbing, by ascr... ...revailed of giving a boy his mother’s name— preceded and strengthened by a male name, as Charles Anne, Victor Victoire. In cases where a mother’s memo... ...ting the early MSS. for 88 The English Mail-Coach and Joan of Arc English males in another. None of us men could have writ- ten the Opera Omnia of Mr... ...n consequent difficulties in arranging for a punc- tual succession of good actors at his theatre, to turn his at- tention to the improvement of the wh... ...of the mail, was transformed into a dream, as tumultuous and changing as a musical fugue. This troubled dream is circumstantially reported in Section ...

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Vanity Fair

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...ndid room, the picture gallery of Gaunt House, was arranged as the charade theatre. It had been so used when George III was king; and a picture of the... ...amels are coming.” An enormous Egyptian head figures in the scene. It is a musical one—and, to the surprise of the oriental travellers, sings a comic ... ...al, and was waiting for her husband in the adjoining dining-room, with fe- male instinct, auguring evil. The door of the dining-room hap- pened to be ... ...n the pit. In the company of this gentleman they visited all the principal theatres of the metropolis; knew the names of all the actors from Drury Lan... ...ed all the principal theatres of the metropolis; knew the names of all the actors from Drury Lane to Sadler’s Wells; and performed, indeed, many of th... ...daughters even, may remember how uncommonly agreeable gentlemen are to the male relations when they are courting the females; and per- 83 Thackeray h... ...ed for the first time to the won- ders of Mozart and Cimarosa. The Major’s musical taste has been before alluded to, and his performances on the flute... ...to read an authentic de- scription of vice than a truly refined English or American fe- male will permit the word breeches to be pronounced in her cha...

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Twilight in Italy

By: D. H. Lawrence

... lifted and extended to view, in all his beautiful, dead youth. The young, male body droops forward on the cross, like a dead flower. It looks as if i... ...which was not herself, ultimately. 21 Twilight in Italy Even the man, the male, was part of herself. He was the mobile, separate part, but he was non... ...la?’ He shows me the paper. It is an old scrap of print, the picture of an American patent door-spring, with directions: ‘Fasten the spring either end... ...ten the spring either end up. Wind it up. Never unwind.’ It is laconic and American. The signore watches me anx- iously, waiting, holding his chin. He... ...ment in front. When at night the moon shines full on this pale façade, the theatre is far outdone in staginess. The hall is spacious and beautiful, wi... ...less society. 48 D. H. Lawrence 3 THE THE THE THE THE THEA THEA THEA THEA THEATRE TRE TRE TRE TRE DURING CARNIVAL a company is playing in the theatre... ...er, the ter- rible subjugation to sex, the phallic worship. The company of actors in the little theatre was from a small town away on the plain, beyon... ...dren, sat absorbed in watching as the Norwegian drama unfolded itself. The actors are peasants. The leader is the son of a peasant proprietor. He is q... ...is loose throat and powerful limbs, his open, blue ex- tinct eyes, and his musical, slightly husky voice, that seemed to sound out of the past. 82 D....

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The Wings of the Dove

By: Henry James

...erned with. I had from far back mentally projected a certain sort of young American as more the “heir of all the ages” than any other young person wha... ...short, was to have enjoyed so much better a chance that, like stars of the theatre condescending to oblige, they have had to take small parts, to cont... ...eir house had the effect of some fine florid voluminous phrase, say even a musical, that dropped first into words and notes without sense and then, ha... ...panish dancer, understood to be at that moment the delight of the town, an American reciter, the joy of a kindred people, an Hungarian fiddler, the wo... ...dmiring eye of friendship, under the clear shadow of some probably eminent male interest. The clear shadow, from whatever source projected, hung at an... ... girl, so easily might have been, like herself, only vague and cruelly fe- male. She was by no means sure of liking Aunt Maud as much as she deserved,... ...special collectively, a sense of pleasant voices, pleasanter than those of actors, of friendly empty words and kind linger- ing eyes that took somehow... ...in view, night after night, for the fiddlers. He remained thus, in his own theatre, in 375 Henry James his single person, perpetual orchestra to the ...

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The Confessions

By: J. J. Rousseau

...ty, I thought everything attainable: I entered with confidence on the vast theatre of the world, which my merit was to capti- vate: at every step I ex... ...ke well: he knew all the great virtuosi, all the celebrated works, all the actors, actresses, pretty women, and powerful lords; in short nothing was m... ...st as suddenly as it arrived. Though this mischance had rather dampened my musical ardor, I did not leave off studying my Rameau, and, by re- peated e... ...er- fectly suited his features: the sound of his voice was clear, full and musical; it was an agreeable and expressive bass, which satisfied the ear, ... ...en scarcely ever forgive. Take the most sensible; the most philosophic fe- male, one the least attached to pleasure, and slighting her fa- vors, if wi... ...the walls of my chamber have ears. Surrounded by spies and by vigilant and malevolent inspectors, disturbed, and my attention diverted, I hastily comm... ... with mine. T o prove this by experience, I taught music gratis to a young American lady, Mademoiselle des Roulins, with whom M. Roguin had brought me... ... retrenching it; going to the coffee-house but every other day, and to the theatre but twice a week. With respect to the expenses of girls of easy vir... ...ly connected with him to pass his name over in silence. M. du Perou was an American, son to a commandant of Surinam, whose successor, M. le Chambrier,...

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A Modern Utopia

By: H. G. Wells

..., and at the word terminology I should insinuate a comment on that eminent American bi- ologist, Professor Mark Baldwin, who has carried the language ... ... see the whole little drama, rather clearer than his words gave it me, the actors all absurdly in Hampstead middle-class raiment, meetings of a Sunday... ...ing the obverse side, and a head thereon—of Newton, as I live! One detects American influ- ence here. Each year, as we shall find, each denomination o... ... chance light on the labour prob- lem—by perforating records for automatic musical ma- chines—no doubt of the Pianotist and Pianola kind—and he spent ... ...ar more from a white man than a negress or pigmy woman from her equivalent male. The education, the mental disposition, of a white or Asiatic woman, r... ...e, perhaps, no more than the jealous and tyr- annous will of the strongest male in the herd, the instru- ment of justice and equality. The State inter... ..., where the public offices will stand in a group close to the two or three theatres and the larger shops, and hither, too, in the case of Lucerne, the... ...nist inclines. The second type includes, amidst its energetic forms, great actors, and popular politi- cians and preachers. Between these extremes is ...

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