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British Museum Guide to the Exhibited Manuscripts : Illuminated Manuscripts and Bindings of Manuscipts Exhibited in the Grenville Library : Part III

By: Julius P. Gilson
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Reuben Sachs: A Sketch

By: Amy Levy

...don and educated in Brighton and at Newnham College, Cambridge. Her social set included Beatrix Potter and Eleanor Marx, with whom she studied in the British Museum Reading Room, and lover Vernon Lee (Violet Padget). (Summary by Adrian Praetzellis)...

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Corpus of a Siam Mosquito

By: Steven David Justin Sills

...." "Why don't they have kings now?" "Well, Canadians do have the British monarchy. Canada is a commonwealth." He didn't go further bec... ...y had seen of the kings' ancient boats that were housed in the Royal Barge Museum. The night and its dark appetites were mature in full ins... ...ng now intimacy?" she spoke with a bit of anger. "Isn' t going to an art museum even a higher intimacy? Isn't being an artist or in my case sharing... ...inception of their friendship, they had attended the natural science freak museum at Siriaj Hospital. In Thailand no one told the truth. They were c... ... of those restaurants. Instead, he was supposed to meet her in front of a museum. He meandered in different pathways throughout many buildings until ... ... buildings until he noticed her sitting on a stoop under a sign that said "Museum" in English. Her hair was shorter than the last time he saw her and...

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Words to Wright By

By: Robin Bayne

...face. Therefore, whether I find craftsmanship and beauty in libraries or art museums, engagements with pen or with brush, there are writing techniques... ... a book is to be measured by what you can carry away from it. ~ James Bryce (British Historian) “For though I be free from all men, yet have I made my...

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Class Heroes: A Class Apart

By: Stephen Henning

... London. They had been on a day trip to St Paul’s Cathedral and the Imperial War Museum. There were shrieks, giggles, mobile ringtones, and competi... .... Anika was tearing out sheets of paper from another girl’s set of Imperial War Museum worksheets, screwing them up, and handing them to Emma. Emma... ... it might have had when it was new had long since been tarnished by time and the British weather. PC O’Brien of the Metropolitan Police trudged up a... ...poken to any of them so far because I have been too upset, I may decide that the British public, and people around the world, have a right to know h... ...p if we had him treated in the US by the very best doctors. 53 That way the British police would have no jurisdiction anyway. We’d pick up the ...

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In the Eye of the Beholder

By: By Sharon E. Cathcart

...ned possible. I tried to keep a normal life, going to cafes, galleries and museums; always, I imagined Erik there with me. Zareh and Antoinette vis... ... him handsomely to do it. So, it is he who goes with you to the cafes, 78 museums, gardens and market. It is he with whom you discuss books and en... ...times. Some days, Gilbert would persuade me to go on an outing with him; the British Museum was a particular favorite. On those occasions, I could f... ...ome days, Gilbert would persuade me to go on an outing with him; the British Museum was a particular favorite. On those occasions, I could forget my... ...y when I felt up to activity, it snowed in London. I had planned to visit a museum, but Gilbert had a different idea. “There is a frozen pond at the... ...iding one of the horses. Sometimes Erik insisted that Gilbert take me to a museum so that I would get out of the house for a while and he could wor...

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The Hitler File : A Novel of Fact

By: Sam Vaknin

... all the way to Jerusalem and, standing on the grounds of Yad Vashem, the Holocaust Museum, she taped the piercing sound and the ensuing silence. ... ...-supporting Jews.” He paused, as if for emphasis: “No one wanted the Jews. The British sealed off Palestine. The Americans imposed immigration ... ... Business Week predicted ‘a steady decline of jingoistic action against the Jews’. British political commentators concurred: ‘Herr Hitler has not in... ...d essentially the same job: Josh was a research librarian at the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington DC. The Genocide Monitoring Group and the M... ... with more than a modicum of trepidation that I decided to pay him a visit. The Museum was the only exhibition space I knew that intentionally i... ... tried everything. We sent couriers with peace offers to both the Americans and the British. We released prisoners from concentration camps. We prom... ...ced moles everywhere: the OSS, later the CIA, not to mention the Communist-infested British MI6. It looked hopeless until someone came with the idea...

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Sunday under Three Heads

By: Charles Dickens

...ir generation, advance precisely the same description of argu ments. In the British Museum, there is a curious pamphlet got up by the Agnews of Charl... ...ation, advance precisely the same description of argu ments. In the British Museum, there is a curious pamphlet got up by the Agnews of Charles’s tim... ...ng which will amuse them, and hurt nobody else. The propriety of opening the British Museum to respect able people on Sunday, has lately been the sub... ... will amuse them, and hurt nobody else. The propriety of opening the British Museum to respect able people on Sunday, has lately been the subject of ... ...ators to assign any valid reason for opposing so sensible a proposition. The Museum contains rich specimens from all the vast museums and repositories... ...e employed upon the Sabbath. They certainly would; but how many? Why, if the British Museum, and the National Gallery, and the Gallery of Practical Sc... ...ed upon the Sabbath. They certainly would; but how many? Why, if the British Museum, and the National Gallery, and the Gallery of Practical Science, a... ...ow different a picture would the streets and public places then present! The museums, and repositories of scientific and useful inventions, would be c...

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Sartor Resartus: The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh

By: Thomas Carlyle

...tional, or any other of those patriotic Libraries, at present the glory of British Literature;” might work revolutions in Thought; and so forth;—in co... ...uch title and vocation, it were perhaps uninteresting to say more. Let the British reader study and enjoy, in simplicity of heart, what is here presen... ... us to that joint-stock ve- hicle of publication, “at present the glory of British Lit- erature”? If so, the Library Editors are welcome to dig in it ... ...ooden Dibble fashioned by man, and those Liverpool Steam-carriages, or the British House of Com- mons, we shall note what progress he has made. He dig... ...le Editor, or Combination of Able Edi- tors, gains the world’s ear. Of the British Newspaper Press, perhaps the most important of all, and wonderful e... ... see it our duty ultimately to deposit these Six Paper-Bags in the British Museum, farther description, and all vituperation of them, may be spared. B... ...ts with care: when did we see any injected Preparation of the Dandy in our Museums; any specimen of him preserved in spirits! Lord Herringbone may dre...

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The New Machiavelli

By: H. G. Wells

...as a Sowerby’s Botany also, with thousands of carefully tinted pictures of British plants, and one or two other important works in the sitting-room. I... ...orant and wretched and the under-equipped and under-staffed Na- tional and British schools, supported by voluntary contribu- tions and sectarian rival... ...still hard at it, and Heaven frightfully upset about the Sunday opening of museums and the falling birth-rate, and as touchy and vindictive as ever. T... ... excursion to Margate and back; we explored London docks and Bethnal Green Museum, Petticoat Lane and all sorts of out-of-the-way places together. We ... ... social phenomenon, the German official, so differ- ent in manner from the British; and when one woke again after that one had come to Bale, and out o... ...“Things are being done?” “Oh!—no doubt of it. It’s one of the parts of the British machinery—that doesn’t show… . But nobody else could do it. “Two pe... ...ndow. She linked with that the fact that Bailey had a mind as orderly as a museum, and an invincible power over detail. She saw that if two people too... ...Baileys’ one extravagance, they loved to think of searches going on in the British Museum, and letters being cleared up and precis made overhead, whil... ... one extravagance, they loved to think of searches going on in the British Museum, and letters being cleared up and precis made overhead, while they s...

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Catherine : A Story

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...itical, or as anything more than the expres- sion of the artist’s national British idea of Frenchmen. It must be confessed that for that great nation ... ... Cruikshank shrugging shoulders, and queer hair and mustachios. He has the British idea of a Frenchman; and if he does not believe that the inhabitant... ...dfire, Squire Jenkins, and Captain O’Shuffleton, are made to show the true British superiority on every occasion when Britons and French are brought t... ...man af- fairs and the evanescent nature of reputation, we have been to the British Museum and no less than five circulating libraries in quest of the ... ...fairs and the evanescent nature of reputation, we have been to the British Museum and no less than five circulating libraries in quest of the book, an... ...at regiment of heroes is “marching to divine service,” to the tune of the “British Grenadiers.” There they march in state, and a pretty contempt our a...

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Pierre Grassou

By: Honoré de Balzac

... from its capsule of cloth. “Wood is dear,” he said to Grassou. “Ah!” “The British are after me” (slang term for creditors) “Gra- cious! do you paint ... ...ess of saying to 23 Balzac them:— “The King has given me an order for the Museum of Versailles.” Madame de Fougeres adores her husband, to whom she h...

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Some Roundabout Papers

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...Jeremiah (it is only my witty way of calling Tom and Jerry), I went to the British Museum the other day on purpose to get it; but somehow, if you will... ... (it is only my witty way of calling Tom and Jerry), I went to the British Museum the other day on purpose to get it; but somehow, if you will press t... ...stmas week? A great philosopher was giving a lecture to young folks at the British Institution. But when this diversion was proposed to our young frie...

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Notes on a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cairo

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...we found ourselves again in the great stalwart roast-beef world; the stout British steamer bearing out of the bay, whose purple waters had grown more ... ...e has often looked on. This was the state-carriage house, where there is a museum of huge old tumble-down gilded coaches of the last century, lying he... ...Atlantic and the Mediterranean, and set there to guard the passage for its British mistress. The next British lion is Malta, four days further on in t... ...- ging up the hideous perpendicular place, you were to find regi- ments of British grenadiers ready to plunge bayonets into your poor panting stomach,... ...” or the brave “Horse Marine,” where the people of our nation are drinking British beer and gin, you hear choruses of “Garryowen” or “The Lass I left ... ...rtifications:as far as I can understand the former, Gibraltar is the great British depot for smuggling goods into the Peninsula. Y ou see vessels lyin... ...hmoud is decorated with the imperial aigrette. In this dismal but splendid museum, I remarked two little tombs with little red fezzes, very small, and...

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Vanity Fair

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...e “Howling Wil- derness,” the “Washerwoman of Wandsworth Common,” and the “British Soldier’s best Bayonet,” which, bent upon awak- ening her before sh... ...woke them in the morning; at nightfall they went to bed to the note of the British fife and drum: all the country and Europe was in arms, and the grea... ...ronged the town, and appeared in every public place, filled George’s truly British soul with in- tense delight. They flung off that happy frigidity an... ...from the conversation. This is a species of dignity in which the high-bred British fe- male reigns supreme. To watch the behaviour of a fine lady to o... ... Opera. It was almost like Old England. The house was filled with familiar British faces, and those toilettes for which the British female has long be... ...h contained a number of useful and valuable little things—in which private museum she placed the one note which Messrs. Jones and Robinson’s cash- ier...

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Sir Dominick Ferrand

By: Henry James

...require to look at them before answering that question.” “I’ve been to the British museum—there are many of his letters there. I’ve obtained permissio... ...to look at them before answering that question.” “I’ve been to the British museum—there are many of his letters there. I’ve obtained permission to see... ... and indeed had spent so many hours in it of late, following him up at the museum and comparing his different portraits, engravings and litho- graphs,...

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Countess Kate

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...hall all come and see me in London, and see the Zoological Gardens and the British Mu- seum; and I will send you such presents!” “We will see,” said M... ...e had told Lady Jane how much she wished to see the Zoological Gardens and British Museum, and had been answered that some day when she was very good ... ...ld Lady Jane how much she wished to see the Zoological Gardens and British Museum, and had been answered that some day when she was very good Aunt Bar... ...th dear little cad- 38 Countess Kate dises and river cray-fish, and great British pearl-shells at the bottom. So we took off our shoes and stockings,... ...ers, and we had such a nice paddling. I really thought I should have got a British pearl then; and you know there were some in the breast-plate of Ven... ... October, and go all to- gether either to the Zoological Gardens or to the British Museum, according to the weather. With these hopes, Kate was only m... ..., and go all to- gether either to the Zoological Gardens or to the British Museum, according to the weather. With these hopes, Kate was only moderatel... ...that no tiny shell nor ivory carving lurked unseen, the room looked like a museum; and Mrs. Umfraville said, “Most of these things were meant for our ...

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A Tramp Abroad

By: Mark Twain

...pale with rage. He says, ‘I’ve shoveled acorns enough in there to keep the family thirty years, and if I can see a sign of one of ‘em I wish I may lan... ...ery numerous. They hailed from every corner of the globe—for instruction is cheap in Heidelberg, and so is living, too. The Anglo-American Club, compo... ...ck-a-brackers were divided as to the wisest course to pursue; some said pack the collection and warehouse it; others said try to get it into the Grand... ... it, as if I had just emptied that jug. Very well; I packed and stored a part of my collec- tion, and the rest of it I placed in the care of the Grand... ...t him. Then we sat down to polish off the perspiration and ar- range about what we would do with him when we got him. Harris was for contributing him ... ...hen we sat down to polish off the perspiration and ar- range about what we would do with him when we got him. Harris was for contributing him to the B... ...to a quarrel. I finally said, very decid- edly: “My mind is made up. He goes to the widow.” Harris answered sharply: “And my mind is made up. He goes ... ...first remains were found, a Chamonix guide named Balmat—a relative of one of the lost men—was in London, and one day encountered a hale old gentleman ... ...tlemen, but are a lower sort, disguised as gentlemen. The case of Colonel Valentine Baker obstructs that argument, for a man cannot become an officer ...

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The World Set Free

By: H. G. Wells

...s, the opening campaign through the Neth- erlands, and the despatch of the British Expeditionary Force were all justified before the book had been pub... ... rela- tively barbaric times. The horse-hair wigs and antic dresses of the British judges, their musty courts and overbearing manners, were indeed onl... ...ool of London University. The older so-called ‘classical’ education of the British pedagogues, probably the most paralysing, ineffec- tive, and foolis... ...complexity and extravagant filthi- ness still astonish the visitors to the museum of machinery at South Kensington. He mentions running over a dog and... ...would have seemed very imposing to the public of 1900. At any mo- ment the British Empire could now put a million and a quar- ter of arguable soldiers... ...euse to the English, and the troop-trains were run direct from the various British depots to the points in the Ardennes where they were intended to en...

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The Wheels of Chance a Bicycling Idyll

By: H. G. Wells

...in Chichester where tourists might go— the cathedral and a remarkably fine museum. I shall go to the cathedral and make an inquiry or so, while Widger... ... shall go to the cathedral and make an inquiry or so, while Widgery—” “The museum. V ery well. And after that there’s a little thing or two I’ve thoug... ... ally a girl. She knew the thing to do was to have a flat and to go to the British Museum and write leading articles for the daily p,tpers until somet... ...girl. She knew the thing to do was to have a flat and to go to the British Museum and write leading articles for the daily p,tpers until something bet... ... Ringwood, and had told him everything forthwith, having met him once at a British As- sociation meeting. He had immediately constituted himself 146 ...

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