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British Museum Guide to the Exhibited Manuscripts : Illuminated Manuscripts and Bindings of Manuscipts Exhibited in the Grenville Library : Part III

By: Julius P. Gilson
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In the Eye of the Beholder

By: By Sharon E. Cathcart

...ned possible. I tried to keep a normal life, going to cafes, galleries and museums; always, I imagined Erik there with me. Zareh and Antoinette vis... ... him handsomely to do it. So, it is he who goes with you to the cafes, 78 museums, gardens and market. It is he with whom you discuss books and en... ...times. Some days, Gilbert would persuade me to go on an outing with him; the British Museum was a particular favorite. On those occasions, I could f... ...ome days, Gilbert would persuade me to go on an outing with him; the British Museum was a particular favorite. On those occasions, I could forget my... ...y when I felt up to activity, it snowed in London. I had planned to visit a museum, but Gilbert had a different idea. “There is a frozen pond at the... ...iding one of the horses. Sometimes Erik insisted that Gilbert take me to a museum so that I would get out of the house for a while and he could wor...

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Autobiographic Sketches Selections, Grave and Gay

By: Thomas de Quincey

...rt to be re- garded as a republication of papers scattered through several British journals twenty or thirty years ago, which papers have been reprint... ...t years, I have received from many quarters in England, in Ireland, in the British colonies, and in the United States, a series of letters expressing ... ...much leisure for study, I pause to explain—that the head of Memnon, in the British Museum, that sublime head which wears upon its lips a smile coexten... ...sure for study, I pause to explain—that the head of Memnon, in the British Museum, that sublime head which wears upon its lips a smile coextensive wit... ... peril than any analogous one that has been proved to exist at Waterloo. A British surgeon, indeed, in a work of two octavo volumes, has endeavored to... ...ained blowing up of tumbrils, under the miserable purpose of shak- ing the British steadiness. But the evidences are not clear; whereas my brother ins... ...atomy, it is a well- established fact, that oftentimes the most scientific museum admitted as genuine fragments of the human osteology what in fact be... ...he nation, and which has since gone to swell the collection at the British Museum, had been formed (as I was often assured by persons to whom the whol... ...nted by the great endowed libraries of the seven universities, the British Museum,” &c., &c. But prima facie, this was that selling of justice which i...

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The English Mail-Coach and Joan of Arc

By: Thomas de Quincey

...on: Sampson Low, Marston & Co., 1895. 9. E. T . MASON. Personal T raits of British Authors. New York, 1885. [4 vols. The volume subtitled Scott, Hogg,... ...for shelter? Is a prison the safest retreat? or a lunatic hospital? or the British Museum?” I should have replied, “Oh no; I’ll tell you what to do. T... ...ter? Is a prison the safest retreat? or a lunatic hospital? or the British Museum?” I should have replied, “Oh no; I’ll tell you what to do. Take lodg... ...e it must go undone. The bet- ter men that I meant were the sailors in the British navy, every man of whom mends his own stockings. Who else is to do ... ... of Post- Office conveyance, and of locomotive machinery generally, in the British Islands. The result was a scheme for supersed- ing, on the great ro... ...the great French admiral who in 1780- 1781 inflicted so much loss upon the British. 70 10 MAGNANIMOUS JUSTICE OF ENGLISHMEN: As Professor Hart observe...

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Chantry House

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...erstand- ing. ‘His ambition is to be curator of something in the Brit- ish Museum, isn’t it?’ Mr. Castleford explained that he meant the other, and my... ...ect of much regret, but I was really sorry to leave our big neighbour, the British Museum, where there were good friends who always made me welcome, a... ...uch regret, but I was really sorry to leave our big neighbour, the British Museum, where there were good friends who always made me welcome, and encou... ...to be my mainstay during this last year. He it was who fetched me from the Museum, took me into the gardens, helped me up and down stairs, spared no p... ...Stafford, who was great in county history, I hunted 39 Yo n g e up in the Museum library all I could discover about our new possession. The Chantry o... ... be packed. A chariot! You young ones have as little notion of one as of a British war-chariot armed with scythes. Y et people of a cer- tain grade we... ...corresponded with Clarence over what now seems so trite; how we viewed the British Critic and T racts for the Times as our oracles, and worried the po... ... drag, for when I could not be with the others, I had old friends, and the museum was as dear to me as ever, in those recesses that had been the parad...

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St. Ives : Being the Adventures of a French Prisoner in England

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...I have heard since then) the Painted Hill. Well, now it was all painted a bright yellow with our costumes; and the dress of the soldiers who guarded u... ... tool slipped! Yes, I am afraid you may go from one to another, and find a flaw in every- thing. Failures for Sale should be on my signboard. I do not... ...and she made a hasty purchase and re- joined her party. A few days after she came again. But I must first tell you how she came to be so frequent. Her... ... forgot his timidity so far as to put many questions; and at last, with another blush, informed me he was himself expecting a commission. ‘Well,’ said... ...t I was not so ill advised as to give it utterance. Every one should be flattered, but boys and women without stint; and I put in the rest of the afte... ...mpropriety. Doubtless the hen has al- ways a puritanic appearance, although (in its own behaviour) I could never observe it to be more particular than...

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Confessions of an English Opium-Eater

By: Thomas de Quincey

...al curiosities, and some time or other I believe I shall present it to the British Museum. 5 The Bristol mail is the best appointed in the Kingdom, o... ...sities, and some time or other I believe I shall present it to the British Museum. 5 The Bristol mail is the best appointed in the Kingdom, owing to ...

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The Portrait of a Lady

By: Henry James

...ed to the consumption of beer by her maid servants; and she affirmed that the British laundress (Mrs. Touchett was very particular about the appearance... ...orms that puzzled him. She questioned him immensely about England, about the British CHAPTER 6 43 constitution, the English character, the state of p... ...e two amused themselves, time and again, with talking of the attitude of the British public as if the young lady had been in a position to appeal to i... ...as if the young lady had been in a position to appeal to it; but in fact the British public remained for the present profoundly indifferent to Miss Is... ...y. Isabel presently found herself in the singular situation of defending the British constitution against her aunt; Mrs. Touchett having formed the ha... ...ch was so much: she saw the different fitted parts of him as she had seen, in museums and portraits, the different fitted parts of armoured warriors—in ... ...and go afterwards to the play; they would frequent the Abbey and the British Museum and find out where Doctor Johnson had lived, and Gold smith and Ad... ... unable to accept or to refute. The party went more than once to the British Museum and to that brighter palace of art which reclaims for an tique va... ...gs—when people are not idiots.” “You do it delightfully. As cicerone of your museum you appear to particular advantage.” Mr. Osmond, in return for thi...

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The Collection of Antiquities

By: Honoré de Balzac

...thing unearthly about them. “Whenever, in after times, I have gone through museums of old furniture in Paris, London, Munich, or Vienna, with the gray... ...eshing coolness to the atmosphere of any room in which a certain number of British females are gathered together. The young men grew serious as a coup... ... colors, and always appeared at balls adorned with the turban, dear to the British female, and lovingly cultivated in out-of-the-way districts in Fran...

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The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth

By: H. G. Wells

...ding audibly; and once I remember—one midday in the vanished past—when the British Association was at Dover, coming on Section C or D, or some such le... ...und of the munching of buns and sandwiches and things that the as- sembled British Associates had come there to eat under cover of the magic-lantern d... ...c of the fifty appearances was certainly that of the wasp that visited the British Museum about mid- day, dropping out of the blue serene upon one of ... ... fifty appearances was certainly that of the wasp that visited the British Museum about mid- day, dropping out of the blue serene upon one of the innu... ...to devour its victim at leisure. After that it crawled for a time over the museum roof, entered the dome of the reading-room by a skylight, buzzed abo... ...ll bushes of broom was the new grass, and amidst these things a company of British soldiers—red-coated as ever—was skirmishing in accordance with the ...

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The Prelude of 1805 in Thirteen Books

By: William Wordsworth

..., as I fear, Proud spring tide swellings for a regular sea, I settle on some British theme, some old 180 Romantic tale by Milton left unsung; More oft... ...ely was not wanting. Carelessly I gazed, roving as through a cabinet Or wide museum, thronged with fishes, gems, 52 The Prelude of 1805 Birds, crocodi...

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Best of Freshman Writing 1 Best of Freshman Writing

By: Lucy Morrison

...spent my happiest child- hood days and where my mother fell in love with a British soldier in the troubled sum- mer of 1973. I have come to see Belfas... ...ng are the stores, cafés, and offices. Behind it lie the nightclubs, bars, museums, and the- aters. Belfast is alive with energy from the crack of daw... ...st array of retail busi- nesses with American coffee bars squeezed next to British clothing stores. Meandering down the main streets idly window-shopp... ...eaters. Visitors to the turn-of-the-century Botanic Gardens or the Belfast Museum make the short trip on foot to the square to dine early or catch a s... ...t- napping, only to awake early and begin the cycle again. The stores, the museums, the theaters, the music on the street corners, and the preaching i...

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Miscellaneous Essays

By: Thomas de Quincey

...l find excellently described in the letters published by Mr. Ellis, of the British Museum,) 17 of Gustavus Adolphus, and of Wallenstein. The King of ... ...xcellently described in the letters published by Mr. Ellis, of the British Museum,) 17 of Gustavus Adolphus, and of Wallenstein. The King of Sweden’s... ...ed surgeon, who assisted at his dis- section. This gentleman had a private museum in the way of his profession, one corner of which was occupied by a ... ...lse it must go undone. The better men that I meant were the sailors in the British navy , every man of whom mends his own stockings. Who else is to do... ...for shelter? Is a prison the safest retreat? Or a lunatic hospital? Or the British Museum?” I should have replied, “Oh, no; I’ll tell you what to do. ... ...ter? Is a prison the safest retreat? Or a lunatic hospital? Or the British Museum?” I should have replied, “Oh, no; I’ll tell you what to do. Take lod...

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Reprinted Pieces

By: Charles Dickens

... creature making a bar of his arm. T wo ideas are generally present to the British mind during these cer emonies; first, that it is necessary to make... ...al affront, which the government at home ought instantly to ‘take up.’ The British mind and body becoming heated by these fantasies, delirious answers... ...puts a placard outside her house announcing her possession of that curious British instrument, a ‘Mingle;’ or when a tavern keeper pro vides accommod... ...en MaClise subdues it to his genius,) it fills my soul with terror at the British Institution, it lures young artists on to their destruction. Go whe... ...Interest, for instance, and from me. Just what they gain, we lose. Certain British ‘Gents’ about the steersman, intellectually nurtured at home on par... ...or Field? Inspector Field is, to night, the guardian genius of the British Museum. He is bringing his shrewd eye to bear on every corner of its solita...

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The $30,000 Bequest : And Other Stories

By: Mark Twain

...Review , and the idea of such a literary breakfast by a stolid, ponderous British ogre of the quill was too much for a naturally weak virtue, and I w... ...d, so to speak. If there is one that isn’t, I desire to acquire him for my museum, and will pay Dinosaur rates. Will you say it isn’t infraction of th... ...a treasure and the most perfect thing of its kind that the storehouses and museums of literature could show. He did not dare to say no to the dread po...

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The Good Soldier

By: Ford Madox Ford

...thout any trinkgeld, right up to the castle. And we were taken through the museum and saw the fire-backs, the old glass, the old swords and the antiqu... ... say that her ideal husband would he one who could get her received at the British Court. She had spent, it seemed, two months in Great Britain—seven ... ...d then he spent the best part of a week, in correspon- dence and up at the British consul’s, in getting the fellow’s wife to come back from London and... ...ces there were vivid and amusing. It was exactly as if I had come out of a museum into a riotous fancy-dress ball. During my life with Florence I had ... ... of her marrying me. And Leonora, I assure you, was the absolutely perfect British ma- tron. She said that she quite favoured my suit; that she could ...

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Life of Johnson

By: James Boswell

... Simpson, Mr. Levett, Captain Garrick, father of the great ornament of the British stage; but above all, Mr. Gilbert Walmsley, Register of the Preroga... ... who had practised his own precepts of oeconomy for sev- eral years in the British capital. He assured Johnson, who, I suppose, was then meditating to... ... and disputed very warmly with Johnson against the well-known maxim of the British constitution, ‘the King can do no wrong;’ affirming, that ‘what was... ...revented from passing his life as he pleases?’ Sir Adam. ‘But, Sir, in the British constitution it is surely of importance to keep up a spirit in the ... ...Saturday, May 9, Mr. Dempster and I had agreed to dine by ourselves at the British Cof- fee-house. Johnson, on whom I happened to call in the morning,... ...e that his prejudice was not virulent; and I have deposited in the British Museum, amongst other pieces of his writing, the following note in answer t... ...hnson and Garrick. But I found he was averse to it. We went and viewed the museum of Mr. Rich- ard Green, apothecary here, who told me he was proud of... ...lding a man 339 Boswell’s Life of Johnson of war, as of collecting such a museum.’ Mr. Green’s obliging alacrity in shewing it was very pleasing. We ... ...that wealth can give. ‘An eminent foreigner, when he was shewn the British Museum, was very troublesome with many absurd inquiries. “Now there, Sir, (...

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Narrative and Miscellaneous Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

... especially in the rainy season, the Ganges is the cock of the walk in our British orient. Else, as regards the body of water discharged, the absolute... ... a step above even that object which some four-and-twenty years ago in the British Museum struck me as simply the sublimest sight which in this sight-... ...above even that object which some four-and-twenty years ago in the British Museum struck me as simply the sublimest sight which in this sight-seeing w... ...heir interests, which has ever marked our too haughty and Caliph-Omar-like British gov- ernment, lay in the circumstance that the glasses of the ap- p... ...er be kicked nor coaxed into vitality. 259 Thomas de Quincey been with us British, from the twelfth century, Thomas of Ercildoune in the north, and m... ...ble, we fear) it took the shape of patriotism. He insisted on it, that our British John Hunter was the genu- ine article, and that Cuvier was a humbug...

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Hesiod the Homeric Hymns and Homerica

By: Hugh G. Evelyn White

...he Homeric Hymns, and Homerica choragic monument of Lysicrates, now in the British Mu- seum (17). Very different in character is the “Hymn to Ares,” w... ...ris, Bibl. Nat. Suppl. Graec. (papyrus) 1099 (4th-5th cent.). B London, British Museam clix (4th cent.). R Vienna, Rainer Papyri L.P . 21-9 (4th... ...2772 (14th cent.). H Florence, Laur. xxxi 32 (15th cent.). I London, British Museaum Harleianus (14th cent.). K Rome, Bibl. Casanat. 356 (14t... ...Estense iii E 11. G Rome, Vatican, Regina 91 (16th cent.). H London, British Mus. Harley 1752. J Modena, Estense, ii B 14. K Florence, Lau... ... voyage when Zeus sank them with a thunderbolt, as Alcidamas states in his Museum. Eratosthenes, however, says in his Hesiod that Ctimenus and Antiphu...

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Information Technology Tales

By: Brad Bradford

... live in flooded, swampy areas? Based on a theory developed in 1930 by British marine biologist Alistair Hardy, Elaine Morgan‘s provocative book ... ...easy-to-harvest shellfish—like today‘s scallops—in abundance.‖ Renowned British brain researcher Michael Crawford, PhD, argues quite persuasively ... ...far-flung as Greece, Sicily, Italy, North Africa, southern Spain, and the British Isles. Vowel signs were missing The Phoenician‘s twenty-two si... ...m the North We now step back in time and then jump over in space to the British Isles to view the evolution of an Information Technology—a special... ...ved better than they would again until the twentieth century.‖ Wealthy British-Roman citizens built into their country houses a hypocaust central ... ...personal copy of Tyndale‘s 1534 New Testament is displayed at the British Museum. Most literate people recognize the King James Bible‘s excellenc... ...d from the back shop forever, as did the Linotypes except for one labeled museum piece that sits in the paper‘s public entrance lobby. One Gazett...

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Hawaii Business Magazine-Special Apec Edition

By: Apec Hawaii Host Committee

..., Ltd. Atherton Family Foundation AT Marketing Belt Collins Hawaii Bishop Museum Bowers and Kubota Cooke Foundation, Ltd. Farmers Insurance Hawaii Fi... ... moist or skirt.” Another must-see place for history bufs is the Bishop Museum. The New York-born banker Charles Reed Bishop founded Bishop Museu... ...y heirlooms and an extensive collection of Hawaiian artifacts, today the museum is bursting with more than 24 million items. Among them are 22 mil... ... Be sure to explore the magnifcent Polynesian and Hawaiian Halls and the museum’s newest addition, the Richard T. Science Adventure Center. Ho‘ona... ...e the frst European to record a visit to the Hawaiian Islands, which the British named the Sandwich Islands. Following Cook’s death in 1779 at Ke...

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What Is Man and Other Essays of Mark Twain

By: Mark Twain

..., greatly performed. Take it to pieces and examine it, if you like. Y.M. A British troop ship crowded with soldiers and their wives and children. She ... ...en Mrs. W. asks how can a millionaire give a single dollar to colleges and museums while one human being is destitute of bread, she has answered her q... ...s, a romantic land where all the birds and flowers and animals were of the museum varieties, and where the alligator and the crocodile and the monkey ... ...d, which is a thing which has never happened be fore, except perhaps in a museum. That is the way with art, when it is not acquired but born to you: ... ...tands fifty seven feet long and six teen feet high in the Natural History Museum, the awe and admiration of all the world, the stateliest skeleton th...

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Sartor Resartus the Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdr Ockh

By: Thomas Carlyle

...National, or any other of those patriotic Libraries, at present the glory of British Literature;” might work revolutions in Thought; and so forth;—in ... ... such title and vocation, it were perhaps uninteresting to say more. Let the British reader study and enjoy, in simplicity of heart, what is here pres... ...ded us to that joint stock vehicle of publication, “at present the glory of British Literature”? If so, the Library Editors are welcome to dig in it ... ...wooden Dibble fashioned by man, and those Liverpool Steam carriages, or the British House of Commons, we shall note what progress he has made. He dig... ...Able Editor, or Com bination of Able Editors, gains the world’s ear. Of the British Newspaper Press, perhaps the most important of all, and wonderful... ...ps see it our duty ultimately to deposit these Six Paper Bags in the British Museum, farther descrip tion, and all vituperation of them, may be spare... ...ts with care: when did we see any injected Prepa ration of the Dandy in our Museums; any specimen of him preserved in spirits! Lord Herringbone may d...

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Heartbreak House : A Fantasia in the Russian Manner on English Themes

By: George Bernard Shaw

...e gave us a longer credit than she gave to France or Germany or Russia. To British centenar- ians who died in their beds in 1914, any dread of having ... ...e flung off as an intolerable affectation; and the picture galler- ies and museums and schools at once occupied by war work- ers. The British Museum i... ...galler- ies and museums and schools at once occupied by war work- ers. The British Museum itself was saved only by a hair’s breadth. The sincerity of ... ... and even German engineering, as malignant abominations stand- ing towards British and French chemistry and so forth in the relation of heaven to hell... ... had to be sown in the bar- ren soil of the trenches. And this was no mere British con- sideration. T o the truly civilized man, to the good European,... ...l soldiers, in the fact that the civilians who found the war such splendid British sport should get a sharp taste of what it was to the actual combata...

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Catherine : A Story

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...her mind was duty above every other feeling!— so strong may it be in every British maiden!) the lovely girl kept her promise. “My former engagements,”... ...ver his head, and putting his arms a-kimbo, “we have learned that from the British, to whom we are superior in everything: and I’d have your Majesty t... ...essons. If your reglars jine General Washington, ’tis to larn from him how Britishers are licked; for I’m blest if yu know the way yet.” Tatua said, “... ...tershire have still many a legend of fear to tell; and the children of the British fishermen tremble even now when they speak of the terrible “Repudia... ...of our country, the chance of the combat might have been in fa- vor of the British vessels. It was not until the “Elector” blew up, at a quarter past ... ...famous instrument and palladium of our liberties at present in the British Museum, Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury—the Magna Charta. His name does no...

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The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope

By: Gilfillan

...e, artistic calm, and judicial gravity, does he set about it! And once his museum of dunces is completed, with what dignity—the little tyrant that he ... ...ch would spoil! ‘Sir, Spain has sent a thousand jars of oil; Huge bales of British cloth blockade the door; A hundred oxen at your leveë roar.’ Poor a... ...ds your breasts with ancient ardour rise, And calls forth Roman drops from British eyes. Virtue confess’d in human shape he draws, What Plato thought,... ... Be justly warm’d with your own native rage: Such plays alone should win a British ear, As Cato’s self had not disdain’d to hear. PR PR PR PR PROL OL ... ...s hers to fight, And hers, when freedom is the theme, to write. For this a British author bids again The heroine rise, to grace the British scene: Her... ...her genuine flame, She asks, What bosom has not felt the same? Asks of the British youth—is silence there? She dares to ask it of the British fair. T ... ...ld Arab, was purchased by the consul of Alexandria, and transmitted to the Museum of Mummius; for proof of which he brings a passage in Sandys’s Trave...

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Man and Superman a Comedy and a Philosophy

By: George Bernard Shaw

...vestryman. No doubt that literary knack of mine which happens to amuse the British public distracts attention from my character; but the character is ... ...nduct, whose power of attention and scope of interest, are measured by the British theatre as you know it to-day, can either handle this colossal task... ...ill not allow you or any man to treat me as if I were a mere member of the British public. I detest its prejudices; I scorn its narrowness; I demand t... ...m. On these points Hector is not quite convinced: he still thinks that the British are apt to make merits of their stupidities, and to represent their... ...s and hidden the day with cloud vast wings. Where are they now? Fossils in museums, and so few and imperfect at that, that a knuckle bone or a tooth o... ...e thoughtfully provided by Provi- dence expressly for the amusement of the British race, and treats him normally with the indulgence due to an inferio...

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume Five

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...to the exaggerated employment of mirrors. We line our dwellings with great British plates, and then imagine we have done a fine thing. Now the slighte... ...y that we must look (if at all, in Appallachia), for the spirituality of a British boudoir. But we have seen apartments in the tenure of Ameri- cans o... ...evering diplomacy, I have gained the assent of the Direc- tors of the City Museum, to my examination of the Mummy— you know the one I mean. I have per... ...ed the vast wealth of the deceased. The treasure had been deposited in the Museum precisely in the same condition in which Captain Sabretash had found... ...ile it has strict connection with poetry in the abstract, and with the old British poems themselves, should not be looked upon as a merit ap- pertaini...

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Lay Morals

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...ghteous and happy, world without end. Amen.’ And who can look twice at the British Parliament and then seriously bring it such a task? I am not advanc... ...and the body which is to regulate their administra- tion no wiser than the British Parliament. So that upon all hands we may look for a form of servit... ...ss the claims of debating societies. It is as a means of melting down this museum of premature petrifactions into living and impres- sionable soul tha...

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Selected Writings

By: Guy de Maupassant

...-room, which opened into the dining-room, had looked like the gallery in a museum, before his precipitate flight. Expensive oil-paintings, water-color... ...ich she usually climbed to dream away her time undisturbed. “She uttered a British ‘Oh,’ which was at once so accentuated and so flattering, that I tu... ...assive, ravished, and enthusiastic, in that ancient city, that astonishing museum of extraordinary Gothic monuments. 150 De Maupassant But one aftern...

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Memories and Portraits

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...ise in a large way of practice over both England and Scotland, nor had any British engineer anything approaching their experience. It was about this n... ... life, and humours the caprices of the tyrant. But the potentate, like the British in India, pays small regard to the character of his willing client,... ..., like Stonehenge, are still afoot, the rest clean vanished. It may be the Museum numbers a full set; and Mr. Ionides perhaps, or else her gracious Ma... ...but it is an old, insu- lar, home-bred staginess; not French, domestically British; not of to-day, but smacking of O. Smith, Fitzball, and the great a...

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