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In the Eye of the Beholder

By: By Sharon E. Cathcart

...ned possible. I tried to keep a normal life, going to cafes, galleries and museums; always, I imagined Erik there with me. Zareh and Antoinette vis... ... him handsomely to do it. So, it is he who goes with you to the cafes, 78 museums, gardens and market. It is he with whom you discuss books and en... ...times. Some days, Gilbert would persuade me to go on an outing with him; the British Museum was a particular favorite. On those occasions, I could f... ...ome days, Gilbert would persuade me to go on an outing with him; the British Museum was a particular favorite. On those occasions, I could forget my... ...y when I felt up to activity, it snowed in London. I had planned to visit a museum, but Gilbert had a different idea. “There is a frozen pond at the... ...iding one of the horses. Sometimes Erik insisted that Gilbert take me to a museum so that I would get out of the house for a while and he could wor...

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An Inland Voyage

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...ion Jack flutters on all the winds of heaven. Under these safeguards, portly cler- gymen, school-mistresses, gentlemen in grey tweed suits, and all th... ...atter, into noisome dungeons: if his papers are in order, he is suffered to go his way indeed, but not until he has been humiliated by a general incre... ...ncs for the narrator. The thing was palpably absurd; but I paid up, and at once dropped all friendliness of manner, and kept him in his place as an in... ...ne has read Zola’s descrip- tion of the workman’s marriage-party visiting the Louvre, they would do well to have heard Bazin by way of anti- dote. He ...

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Bleak House

By: Charles Dickens

...as no objection to an interminable Chancery suit. It is a slow, expensive, British, constitutional kind of thing. T o be sure, he has not a vital inte... ...be in part a little library of books and papers and in part quite a little museum of his boots and shoes and hat boxes. “Sit down, my dear,” said Mr. ... ...dmiring Mrs. Snagsby the regular acute professional eye which is thrown on British jurymen. “Now, ma’am, perhaps you’ll have the kindness to tell us ... ...om that truly national work The Divinities of Albion, or Galaxy Gallery of British Beauty, representing ladies of title and fash ion in every variety... ...e market gardens, he decorates his apartment; and as the Galaxy Gallery of British Beauty wears every variety of fancy dress, plays every variety of m... ...orrow gives him a thrill of joy. To be informed what the Galaxy Gallery of British Beauty is about, and means to be about, and what Galaxy marriages a...

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Bleak House

By: Charles Dickens

...as no objection to an interminable Chancery suit. It is a slow, expensive, British, constitutional kind of thing. T o be sure, he has not a vital inte... ...be in part a little library of books and papers and in part quite a little museum of his boots and shoes and hat boxes. “Sit down, my dear,” said Mr. ... ...dmiring Mrs. Snagsby the regular acute professional eye which is thrown on British jurymen. “Now, ma’am, perhaps you’ll have the kindness to tell us ... ...om that truly national work The Divinities of Albion, or Galaxy Gallery of British Beauty, representing ladies of title and fash ion in every variety... ...e market gardens, he decorates his apartment; and as the Galaxy Gallery of British Beauty wears every variety of fancy dress, plays every variety of m... ...orrow gives him a thrill of joy. To be informed what the Galaxy Gallery of British Beauty is about, and means to be about, and what Galaxy marriages a...

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Don Juan

By: George Byron

...ish readers should grow skittish, I ‘ve bribed my grandmother’s review—the British. I sent it in a letter to the Editor, Who thank’d me duly b... ...of those. As for the ladies, I have nought to say, A wanderer from the British world of fashion, Where I, like other ‘dogs, have had my day,’ ... ...ecruits with wives.’ ‘May it please your excellency,’ thus replied Our British friend, ‘these are the wives of others, And not our own. I am t... ...ill these great relics, when they see ‘em, Look like the monsters of a new museum? But I am apt to grow too metaphysical: ‘The time is out of ... ...en a kind of a discussion, A sort of treaty or negotiation Between the British cabinet and Russian, Maintain’d with all the due prevaricatio... ...f the sea (See Billingsgate) made even the tongue more free. And yet the British ‘Damme’ ‘s rather Attic: Your continental oaths are but incon...

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Life of Johnson

By: James Boswell

... Simpson, Mr. Levett, Captain Garrick, father of the great ornament of the British stage; but above all, Mr. Gilbert Walmsley, Register of the Preroga... ... who had practised his own precepts of oeconomy for sev- eral years in the British capital. He assured Johnson, who, I suppose, was then meditating to... ... and disputed very warmly with Johnson against the well-known maxim of the British constitution, ‘the King can do no wrong;’ affirming, that ‘what was... ...revented from passing his life as he pleases?’ Sir Adam. ‘But, Sir, in the British constitution it is surely of importance to keep up a spirit in the ... ...Saturday, May 9, Mr. Dempster and I had agreed to dine by ourselves at the British Cof- fee-house. Johnson, on whom I happened to call in the morning,... ...e that his prejudice was not virulent; and I have deposited in the British Museum, amongst other pieces of his writing, the following note in answer t... ...hnson and Garrick. But I found he was averse to it. We went and viewed the museum of Mr. Rich- ard Green, apothecary here, who told me he was proud of... ...lding a man 339 Boswell’s Life of Johnson of war, as of collecting such a museum.’ Mr. Green’s obliging alacrity in shewing it was very pleasing. We ... ...that wealth can give. ‘An eminent foreigner, when he was shewn the British Museum, was very troublesome with many absurd inquiries. “Now there, Sir, (...

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