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North America Volume Two

By: Anthony Trollope

..................................... 164 CHAPTER IX: THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES ................................................................ .............................. 164 CHAPTER IX: THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES ....................................................................... ......................... 226 CHAPTER XI: THE LA W COURTS AND LA WYERS OF THE UNITED STATES ........................................... 242 CHAPTER XII: ... .................. 226 CHAPTER XI: THE LA W COURTS AND LA WYERS OF THE UNITED STATES ........................................... 242 CHAPTER XII: THE FIN... ...building, therefore, is wrong side foremost, and all mankind who enter it, Senators, Representatives, and judges included, go in at the back door. Of ... ... America V ol. 2 facts, was not the case. I had gone down the river with a party of ladies, and we were opposite to Mount Vernon; but on that occasion... ...re all secessionists, but the town was held by the North- 25 Trollope ern party. Through the lines, into Virginia, they could not go at all. Up to Wa... ... indeed there was such a shout of triumph that no ministry in a country so democratic could have ventured to go at once against it, and to do so witho... ... to their work with the exercise of all their energies. They organized the Democratic party so 58 North America V ol. 2 as to include the leaders amo...

................................................................................................................ 164 CHAPTER IX: THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES .................................................................... 185 CHAPTER X: THE GOVERNMENT ...................................................................................................................

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 6 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...vy,” approved 21st of December, 1861, provides: “That the President of the United States by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall have ... ...proved 21st of December, 1861, provides: “That the President of the United States by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall have the aut... ...nd such officers may, if upon the recommendation of the Presi- dent of the United States they shall receive a vote of thanks of Congress for their ser... ... officers may, if upon the recommendation of the Presi- dent of the United States they shall receive a vote of thanks of Congress for their services a... ...ited on by a large committee who present a petition signed by twenty-three senators and eighty-four rep- resentatives asking me to restore General Ham... ... nec- essary to ascertain the amount of indemnification due to the injured party. The United States consul-general at Havana was consequently instruct... ...as directed, in view of the occupation of the capital by the revolutionary party and of the uncertainty of the civil war, not to present his credentia... ...nredeemed promise of more than half a year’s standing. A. LINCOLN. FURTHER DEMOCRATIC PARTY CRITICISM TO M. BIRCHARD AND OTHERS. W ASHINGTON, D. C., J... ...M. BIRCHARD, DA VID A. HOUK, et al: GENTLEMEN:—The resolutions of the Ohio Democratic State convention, which you present me, together with your intro...

...: The third section of the ?Act further to promote the efficiency of the Navy,? approved 21st of December, 1861, provides: ?That the President of the United States by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall have the authority to detail from the retired list of the navy for the command of squadrons and single ships such officers as he may believe that the good ...

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Democracy in America

By: Alexis de Tocqueville

...e eleven years that separated the Declaration of the In- dependence of the United States from the completion of that act in the ordination of our writ... ...n years that separated the Declaration of the In- dependence of the United States from the completion of that act in the ordination of our written Con... ...hich was ex- perimental in our plan of government was the question whether democratic rule could be so organized and conducted that it would not degen... ...on, all of whom were young men, in building upon the Inde- pendence of the United States that wisest and best plan of general government that was ever... ... of whom were young men, in building upon the Inde- pendence of the United States that wisest and best plan of general government that was ever devise... ...ghts of citizenship, including the right of suffrage. This was a political party movement, intended to be radical and revolu- tionary, but it will, ul... ...He beheld, and deplored, the excesses that had attended the genesis of the democratic spirit in France, and while he loved liberty, he detested the cr... ...ture to the level of the lowest, are no longer considered. The violence of party spirit has been mitigated, and the judg- ment of the wise is not subo... ...than a year; the former usually sit two or three years. By granting to the senators the privilege of being chosen for several years, and being renewed...

...Excerpt: In the eleven years that separated the Declaration of the Independence of the United States from the completion of that act in the ordination of our written Constitution, the great minds of America were bent upon the study of the principles of government that were essential to the preservation of the l...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 7 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...THE HOUSE. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, that, before the first meet... ...SE. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, that, before the first meeting of ... ...show that they were regularly elected in accordance with the laws of their States respec- tively, or the laws of the United States. Approved March 3, ... ...ccordance with the laws of their States respec- tively, or the laws of the United States. Approved March 3, 1863. 7 The Writings of Abraham Lincoln: ... ...slature. All such are radical and administration men. The election of two Senators from this place on Thursday will prob- ably turn upon this thing.”... ... nor involuntary servitude, except in the punishment of crimes whereof the party shall have been duly convicted; that the General Assembly may make su... ...to do the work over accord- ing to the law, in presence of the complaining party, and thereby to correct anything which might be found amiss. The com... ... be decided in November. There is no pro- gram offered by any wing of the Democratic party but that must result in the permanent destruction of the U... ...thmetic will prove to any man that the rebel armies cannot be destroyed by Democratic strategy. It would sacrifice all the white men of the North to ...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 4 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...can be made, except in the State Legislature,—not in the Con- gress of the United States; and as I do not really apprehend the approach of any such th... ...made, except in the State Legislature,—not in the Con- gress of the United States; and as I do not really apprehend the approach of any such thing mys... ...he floor of the Senate, had declared there had been a conference among the senators, in which conference it was determined to have an enabling act pas... ...hat would be a most mani- fest reason for it. It is true, as Judge Douglas states, that many Territorial bills have passed without having such a provi... ...lection for the adoption of the constitution, shall be obligatory upon the United States and the said State of Kansas.” Now, Trumbull alleges that the... ...zens, this much may be said in reply: That bill had been in the hands of a party to which Trumbull did not belong. It had been in the hands of the com... ...n regard to the Mexican War story the more respectable pa- pers of his own party throughout the State have been com- pelled to take it back and acknow... ...ole earth ever said so, until the necessities of the present policy of the Democratic party, in regard to slavery, had to invent that affirmation. And... ...o that division. Don’t you remember how two years ago the opponents of the Democratic party were di- vided between Fremont and Fillmore? I guess you d...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 3 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

... and by which Convention Mr. LINCOLN had been named as their candidate for United States Sena- tor. Mr. DOUGLAS was not present.] Mr. PRESIDENT AND GE... ... which Convention Mr. LINCOLN had been named as their candidate for United States Sena- tor. Mr. DOUGLAS was not present.] Mr. PRESIDENT AND GENTLEMEN... ...ocates will push it forward till it shall become alike law- ful in all the States, old as well as new, North as well as South. Have we no tendency to ... ...c institutions in their own way, sub- ject only to the Constitution of the United States.” Then opened the roar of loose declamation in favor of “squa... ...o are trying 13 The Writings of Abraham Lincoln: V ol Three to divide the Democratic party for the purpose of electing a Republican Senator in my pla... ...g 13 The Writings of Abraham Lincoln: V ol Three to divide the Democratic party for the purpose of electing a Republican Senator in my place are just... ...what may be a right definition of the term alliance. If for the Republican party to see the other great party to which they are opposed divided among ... ...ng—I take it upon myself to defy any man to show a printed resolution of a Democratic meeting, large or small— in favor of Judge Trumbull, or any of t... ...sition, and that he did it because there was a standing instruction to our Senators to be always introducing Nebraska bills. He tells you he is for th...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 5 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...en of 1856 very differently from what they seem to [be] going in the other party. Below is the vote of 1856, in your district: Counties. Counties. Bu... ...dvocates will push it forward till it shall become alike lawful in all the States, old as well as new, North as well as South.” Judge Douglas makes us... ...ion of Judge Douglas, and such were the opinions of the leading men of the Democratic Party. Even as late as the spring of 1856 Mr. Buchanan said, a s... ...e Douglas, and such were the opinions of the leading men of the Democratic Party. Even as late as the spring of 1856 Mr. Buchanan said, a short time s... ...question is settled. He says the bill he introduced into the Senate of the United States on the 4th day of January, 1854, settled the slavery question... ...n is settled. He says the bill he introduced into the Senate of the United States on the 4th day of January, 1854, settled the slavery question foreve... ...s that in that year there were over four hundred thousand mulattoes in the United States. Now let us take what is called an Abolition State—the Republ... ...e a concise statement of the dif- ference, as I understand it, between the Democratic and Re- publican parties, on the leading issues of the campaign.... ...t the Bloomington con- vention in 1856. During the canvass of 1858 for the senatorship my belief was, and still is, that I had no more sincere and fai...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 1 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

... yet it is in a peculiar degree both illustrative and typical of the great statesman who made it, alike in its strong com- 4 The Writings of Abraham ... ...oughout his entire life, and especially after he rose to leadership in his party, Lincoln was stirred to his depths by the sense of fealty to a lofty ... ...He says: “….the moral qualities that are required in the higher spheres of statesmanship [are not] those of a hero or a saint. Passionate earnestness ... ... American statesman since Washington, the statesman who in this absolutely democratic republic succeeded best, was the very man who actually combined ... ...s; he read Robinson Crusoe, The Pilgrim’s Progress, a short history of the United States, and Weems’s Life of Washington. To the town constable’s he w... ...Writings of Abraham Lincoln: V ol One won him the election in the strongly Democratic district. Then for the first time, perhaps, he thought seriously... ...n their claims seemed to him unfair. Presenting his very first case in the United States Circuit Court, the only question being one of authority, he d... ...ple, broke forth in an utterance louder than ever. The bonds of accustomed party allegiance gave way. Antislavery Democrats and antislavery Whigs felt... ...t the conven- tion which nominated him as the Republican candidate for the senatorship, with a memorable saying which sounded like a shout from the wa...

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My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglass. With an Introduction. By James M'Cune Smith

By: Frederick Douglas

...umulating, not from the ranks of the half-freed colored people of the free states, but from the very depths of slavery itself; the indestructible equa... ...rgan of the downtrodden, edited and published by one of themselves, in the United States. 13 Frederick Douglas The result of this visit was, that on ... ... the downtrodden, edited and published by one of themselves, in the United States. 13 Frederick Douglas The result of this visit was, that on his ret... ... Frederick Douglas The result of this visit was, that on his return to the United States, he established a newspaper. This proceeding was sorely again... ...came the trial hour. Without cordial support from any large body of men or party on this side the Atlantic, and too far distant in space and immediate... ...arduous labor and heavy ex- penditure of editor and lecturer. The Garrison party, to which he still adhered, did not want a colored newspaper—there wa... ... increase their stock of knowledge, to seek pleasure, to have their rough, democratic manners softened by contact with English aristocratic re- fineme... ...d I have crossed three thousand miles of the peril- ous deep. Instead of a democratic government, I am under a monarchical government. Instead of the ... ...es, a pro-slavery, political board of health is established at Washington. Senators Hale, Chase, and Sumner are robbed of a part of their senatorial d...

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The C‘Sars

By: Thomas de Quincey

...headless Ciceros (truncosque Cicerones), and unburied Pompeys;—to whom the party madness of thy own children had wrought in every age heavier woe than... ... a ferocity in his character, and a touch of the devil in him, very rarely united with the same tranquil intrepidity. But for Cæsar, the all-accomplis... ...ed with the same tranquil intrepidity. But for Cæsar, the all-accomplished statesman, the splendid orator, the man of elegant habits and polished tast... ...f evading the ne- cessity (else perhaps not avoidable), of drawing out the party sentiments of the magistrates in the circumstances of honor or neglec... ...ection of tents, in a vast circuit about the city. Multitudes of men, even senators, and others of the highest rank, were trampled to death in the cro... ...autocracy. Even in the most prosper- ous days of the Roman State, when the democratic forces balanced, and were balanced by, those of the aristocracy,... ... as it were, rose in a body with one voice, and apparently with one heart, united by mere force of in- dignant sympathy, to put him down, and “abate” ... ...the excesses of the autocrat. Even in the bloody despotisms of the Barbary States, there has always existed in the religious prejudices of the people,... ...omises, *V ery remarkable it is, and a fact which speaks volumes as to the democratic constitution of the Roman army, in the midst of that aristocracy...

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Plutarchs Lives Volume Two

By: Hugh Clough

... the people, he was disappointed, and lost the place, being opposed by the party of Sylla, which seems to have been the principal cause of his subsequ... ...ttempted to recall the lost in- terest of Marius, Sertorius joined Cinna’s party, more par- ticularly as he saw that Octavius was not very capable, an... ...y cohorts. And when now all the cities on this side of the river Ebro also united their forces together under his command, his army grew great, for th... ...time, showed the loftiness of his temper in calling together all the Roman senators who had fled from Rome, and had come and resided with him, and giv... ...magogues and the orators in Thebes and Athens, and thus inciting those two States to hostility against Sparta. Having passed the Hellespont, he marche... ... ascendant which he had over Crassus; for he, the wealthiest among all the states- men of his time, and the most eloquent and greatest too, who had lo... ... now succeeded in making up, and by this means strengthened himself by the united power of both, and so under the cover of an action which carried all... ...im, and restore the commonwealth to the Syracusans; not that he approved a democratic government, but thought it altogether preferable to a tyranny, w... ...e that constitution he intended; for he designed to suppress the unlimited democratic government, which in- deed is not a government, but, as Plato ca...

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Plutarchs Lives Volume One

By: Hugh Clough

...rom the gods. Both warriors; that by all the world’s allowed. Both of them united with strength of body an equal vigor mind; and of the two most famou... ...st and sacrifice, which he called Panathenaea, or the sacrifice of all the united Athenians. He instituted also another sacrifice, called Metoecia, or... ...e Pitthean maid, To your town the terms and fates, My father gives of many states. Be not anxious nor afraid; The bladder will not fail so swim On the... ...actions of his former life. Theseus was now fifty years old, as Hellanicus states, when he carried off Helen, who was yet too young to be married. Som... ...the town. And here, they say, Alycus, the son of Sciron, was slain, of the party of the Dioscuri (Castor and Pollux), from whom a place in Megara, whe... ...ive them the name of patricians. For at this very time all foreigners give senators the style of lords; but 45 Plutarch’s Lives the Romans, making us... ...nd confederacy with him. Fidenae he took, a neighboring city to Rome, by a party of horse, as some say, whom he sent before with commands to cut down ... ...to make great innovations. The frame of govern- ment which Numa formed was democratic and popular to 128 V olume One the last extreme, goldsmiths and... ...t with the many and poor, contrary to his natural bent, which was far from democratical; but, most likely, fearing he might fall under suspicion of ai...

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Babbitt

By: Sinclair Lewis

... objects. They were of eternal importance, like baseball or the Republican Party. They included a fountain pen and a silver pencil (always lacking a s... ...they will. You remember when you didn’t dress for the Littlefields’ supper-party, and all the rest did, and how embarrassed you were.” “Embarrassed, h... ...ght expensive ties “and could pay cash for ‘em, too, by golly;” and at the United Cigar Store, with its crimson and gold alertness, he reflected, “Won... ...ollars—bet there isn’t more than five per cent. of the people in the whole United States that make more than Uncle George does, by golly! Right up at ... ...bet there isn’t more than five per cent. of the people in the whole United States that make more than Uncle George does, by golly! Right up at the top... ...his evening and, after an adequate sketch of the day’s progressive weather-states, his four-hundred- and-fifty-dollar fee, his lunch with Paul Rieslin... ...of the Presbyte- rian Church determined his every religious belief and the senators who controlled the Republican Party decided in little smoky rooms ... ...d given him the beginning of a repu- tation for oratory, so the Republican-Democratic Central Committee sent him to the Seventh Ward and South Ze- nit... ... and it was always thinning into silence. Despite their reso- lution to be democratic they divided into two sets: the men with dress-clothes and the m...

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Autobiographic Sketches Selections, Grave and Gay

By: Thomas de Quincey

... many quarters in England, in Ireland, in the British colonies, and in the United States, a series of letters expressing a far profounder interest in ... ...uarters in England, in Ireland, in the British colonies, and in the United States, a series of letters expressing a far profounder interest in papers ... ...s, in that final stage of her transmutations to which Cicero was himself a party—and, as I maintain, a most selfish and un- patriotic party. He was go... ... And perhaps this natural prece- dency in authority of years and judgment, united to the ten- der humility with which she declined to assert it, had b... ...tributed. Coleridge ascended the Brocken on the Whitsunday of 1799, with a party of English stu- dents from Goettingen, but failed to see the phantom;... ...t often the most aristocratic, yet also, for many noble purposes, the most democratic of lands. 2 Five years ago, during the carnival of universal an... ...vil grandeur, as exemplified in three differ- ent modes by three different states. Availing himself of the brief scriptural notice,—“The devil taketh ... ... even greater on a comparison of nations and eras. In England we have seen senators of mark and au- thority, nay, even a prime minister, the haughties... ... an unfortunate reserve of manner. Whilst, on the contrary, Mr. Fox, ultra democratic in his principles and frank in his address, was repulsively aris...

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The French Revolution a History Volume Three

By: Thomas Carlyle

...in the last days of October, Frau Forster, a daughter of Heyne’s, somewhat democratic, walking out of the Gate of Mentz with her Husband, finds French... ...e, have pre- cisely this problem to solve. Under the name and nickname of ‘statesmen, hommes d’etat,’ of ‘moderate-men, moderantins, ’ of Brissotins, ... ...s good: but what can it profit here? If the truth must be spoken, O august Senators, the only Law in this case is: Vae victis, the loser pays! Seldom ... ...n Wednesday, therefore, at the cold dark hour of eight in the morning, all Senators are at their post. Indeed they warm the cold hour, as we find, by ... ...fties on the President’s List. Nay these Gironde Presidents give their own party preference: we suspect they play foul with the List; men of the Moun-... ... At home this Killing of a King has divided all friends; and abroad it has united all enemies. Fraternity of Peoples, Revo- lutionary Propagandism; At... ... usual number at one time: let these two fight it out, all minor shades of party rallying under the shade likest them; when the one has fought down t... ...x eclats,’ at the gentilities and superfine airs of these Girondin “men of statesmanship,” with their pedantries, plausibilities, pusillanimities: “th... ...own side: and now there is no Election, or only the third of one. Black is united with white against this clause of the Two-thirds; all the Unruly of ...

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Lord Ormont and His Aminta

By: George Meredith

...on similar to that between master and boys at Cuper’s es- tablishment: one party for our modern English magisterial methods with Indians, the other fo... ...the man and the woman, her sense of justice was moved to join her with the party of her unfairly handled sisters—a strong party, if it were not so cow... ...ofessional landlady for the blessing of the par- son, and are legitimately united. Women have won round fools to give way in that way. And quite right... ...On that subject, Aminta said she did not know what to think. Now, if a man states the matter he thinks, and a woman does but listen, whether inclining... ... of 130 Lord Ormont and His Aminta Ormont which so violently offended the democratic aristo- crat, and caused her to resent it as an assault on the f... ...assing from the living to the dead, from the dead to the living, they were united in his heart. Her brevity of tone, and her speech, so practical upon... ...ur- gent, the sapper of her character; and as we see in certain disorderly States a curative incendiarism usurp the functions of the sluggish citizen,... ... understands what I say, and I learn from him. I don’t learn much from our senators, or great lawyers, great 163 George Meredith doctors, professors,... ... to be my superiors. On the other hand, I have not felt the same with “our senators, rulers, and lawgivers.” They are for the most part deficient in t...

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Don Juan

By: George Byron

...ching, leaving still behind Something of which its masters are afraid, States to be curb’d and thoughts to be confined, Conspiracy or Congress... ...es, making history change its tune, Then spur away o’er empires and o’er states, Leaving at last not much besides chronology, Excepting the po... ... Love’s, and Night’s, and Ocean’s solitude, O’erflow’d her soul with their united power; Amidst the barren sand and rocks so rude She and her ... ... their witness, and the cave their bed, By their own feelings hallow’d and united, Their priest was Solitude, and they were wed: And they were... ...e. Byron’s Don Juan “Canto Four” 114 By one of these, the buffo of the party, Juan was told about their curious case; For although destine... ...corporal Some Cossacques, hovering like hawks round a hill, Had met a party towards the twilight’s fall, One of whom spoke their tongue—or we... ...rest, voted, shone, and, may be, something more; With dandies dined; heard senators declaiming; Seen beauties brought to market by the score, ... ...the other way, And wax an ultra royalist in loyalty, Because I hate even democratic royalty. I think I should have made a decent spouse, If ...

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Moby-Dick or the Whale

By: Herman Melville

...n something like this: “Grand Contested Election for the Presidency of the United States. “WHALING VOYAGE BY ONE ISHMAEL. “BLOODY BATTLE IN AFFGHANIST... ...hing like this: “Grand Contested Election for the Presidency of the United States. “WHALING VOYAGE BY ONE ISHMAEL. “BLOODY BATTLE IN AFFGHANISTAN.” Th... ...burns, and destroys all sin though he pluck it out from under the robes of Senators and Judges. Delight, — top gallant delight is to him, who acknowle... ... slabs laced together, mutually sloped towards each other, and at the apex united in a tufted point, where the loose hairy fibres waved to and fro like... ...ildad, to my no small surprise, considering that he was such an interested party in these proceedings; Bildad never heeded us, but went on mumbling to... ...shalt see it shining in the arm that wields a pick or drives a spike; that democratic dignity which, on all hands, radiates without end from God; Hims... ...e royal mantle of humanity over all my kind! Bear me out in it, thou great democratic God! who didst not refuse to the swart convict, Bunyan, the pale... ...pon which Linnaeus would fain have banished the whales from the waters, he states as follows: “On account of their warm bilocular heart, their lungs, ... ...little Flask, he was the youngest son, and little boy of this weary family party. His were the shinbones of the saline beef; his would have been the d...

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Moby Dick; Or the Whale

By: Herman Melville

...n something like this: “Grand Contested Election for the Presidency of the United States. “Whaling V oyage by One Ismael. “Bloody Battle in Affghanist... ...hing like this: “Grand Contested Election for the Presidency of the United States. “Whaling V oyage by One Ismael. “Bloody Battle in Affghanistan.” Th... ...rns, and de- stroys all sin though he pluck it out from under the robes of Senators and Judges. Delight,—top-gallant delight is to him, who acknowledg... ... slabs laced together, mutually sloped towards each other, and at the apex united in a tufted point, where the loose hairy fibres waved to and fro lik... ...ildad, to my no small surprise, considering that he was such an interested party in these proceedings; Bildad never heeded us, but went on mumbling to... ...shalt see it shining in the arm that wields a pick or drives a spike; that democratic dig- nity which, on all hands, radiates without end from God; Hi... ...pon which Linnaeus would fain have banished the whales from the waters, he states as follows: “On account of their warm bilocular heart, their lungs, ... ...little Flask, he was the youngest son, and little boy of this weary family party. His were the shinbones of the saline beef; his would have been the d...

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The 9/11 Commission Report Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States

By: Thomas H. Kean

... Qaeda (1988–1992) 55 2.4 Building an Organization, Declaring War on the United States (1992–1996) 59 2.5 Al Qaeda’s Renewal in Afghanistan (1996–... ...(1988–1992) 55 2.4 Building an Organization, Declaring War on the United States (1992–1996) 59 2.5 Al Qaeda’s Renewal in Afghanistan (1996–1998) ... ...MS 215 7.1 First Arrivals in California 215 7.2 The 9/11 Pilots in the United States 223 7.3 Assembling the Teams 231 7.4 Final Strategies and... ...5 7.1 First Arrivals in California 215 7.2 The 9/11 Pilots in the United States 223 7.3 Assembling the Teams 231 7.4 Final Strategies and Tactic... ...t consulted his senior advisers about his remarks. No one in the traveling party had any information during this time that other aircraft were hijacke... ...ed by Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser’s Arab Socialism or the Ba’ath Party of Syria and Iraq) that called for a single, secular Arab state. Howe... ...e reform proposals of the intelligence community, such as those offered by Senators Boren and McCurdy. That said, Congress still took too little actio... ...Muslim states.A cen- tral government has been established in Kabul, with a democratic constitution, new currency, and a new army. Most Afghans enjoy g... ... communities.Y et even if his efforts are successful and elections bring a democratic government to Afghanistan, the United States faces some difficul...

...Excerpt: We present the narrative of this report and the recommendations that flow from it to the President of the United States, the United States Congress, and the American people for their consideration. Ten Commissioners--five Republicans and five Democrats chosen by elected leaders from our nation?s capital at a time of great partisa...

...2 Bin Ladin?s Appeal in the Islamic World 48 2.3 The Rise of Bin Ladin and al Qaeda (1988?1992) 55 2.4 Building an Organization, Declaring War on the United States (1992?1996) 59 2.5 Al Qaeda?s Renewal in Afghanistan (1996?1998) 63 3. COUNTERTERRORISM EVOLVES 71 3.1 From the Old Terrorism to the New: The First World Trade Center Bombing 71 3.2 Adaptation?and Nonadaptation?...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 2 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...save only that of slavery. So far as I can perceive, by such union neither party need yield any- thing on the point in difference between them. If the... ...ink annexation an evil. I hold it to be a paramount duty of us in the free States, due to the Union of the States, and perhaps to liberty itself (para... ...berty itself (paradox though it may seem), to let the slavery of the other States alone; while, on the other hand, I hold it to be equally clear that ... ... LINCOLN. 20 The Writings of Abraham Lincoln: V ol Two RESOLUTIONS IN THE UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, DECEMBER 22, 1847 Whereas, The Pres... ... HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, DECEMBER 22, 1847 Whereas, The President of the United States, in his mes- sage of May 11, 1846, has declared that “the Mex... ...ced by the President. I admit that such a vote should not be given in mere party wantonness, and that the one given is justly censurable if it have no... ...at may properly be called an internal im- provement veto message. The late Democratic conven- tion, which sat at Baltimore, and which nominated Gen- e... ...eral Cass for the Presidency, adopted a set of resolutions, now called the Democratic platform, among which is one in these words: “That the Constitut... ...ce than is just. There is another cause. In 1840, for instance, we had two senators and five repre- sentatives in Sangamon; now we have part of one se...

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North America Volume One

By: Anthony Trollope

...ION It has been the ambition of my literary life to write a book about the United States, and I had made up my mind to visit the country with this obj... ...has been the ambition of my literary life to write a book about the United States, and I had made up my mind to visit the country with this object bef... ... visit the country with this object before the in- testine troubles of the United States government had com- menced. I have not allowed the division a... ...the country with this object before the in- testine troubles of the United States government had com- menced. I have not allowed the division among th... ...y of State to declare openly that England intended to side either with one party or with the other, or else to remain neutral between them. I had hear... ...er of the cause and ground for revolu- tion, it is so very easy for either party to put in a plea that shall be satisfactory to itself! Mr. and Mrs. J... ...ich it may have been guilty will be condoned by the world. The Southern or Democratic party of the United States had, as all men know, been in power f... ... nationalities as the States of New York and Pennsyl- vania, and sends two Senators to the Senate at Washing- ton, as do those enormous States. Small ... ...d assisted at its birth. In Massachusetts itself, also, there was a strong Democratic party, of which Massachusetts now seems to be somewhat ashamed. ...

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A Treatise on Government Translated from the Greek of Aristotle

By: William Ellis A. M.

...r Aristotle did not separate, as we are inclined to do, the spheres of the statesman and the moralist. In the Ethics he has described the character ne... ...he individual but in a description of the legislative opportunities of the statesman. It is the legislator’s task to frame a society which shall make ... ...nceptions of the good. In so far as men conceive the good rightly they are united. The state represents their common agreement, force their failure to... ...ts, the rivalry of parties, and the struggle of classes, instead of in the united seeking after a common good. Plato and Aristotle were familiar with ... ...ent in species, but more or less are not. And yet it is wonderful that one party ought to have them, and the other not; for if he who is to govern sho... ...and- men and soldiers, and from these he select a third part who are to be senators and govern the city; but he has not said whether or no the husband... ...t, the sen- ate the oligarchical; and, that in the ephori may be found the democratical, as these are taken from the people. But some say, that in the... ...r, and that it is their common meal and daily course of life, in which the democratical form is represented. It is also said in this trea- tise of [12... ...hould bring with him a tablet, on which he should write, that he found the party guilty, if it was so, but if not, he should bring a plain tablet; but...

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An Englishman Looks at the World Being a Series of Unrestrained Remarks Upon Contemporary Matters

By: H. G. Wells

...rom the Mediterranean. Italian work- men by the hundred thousand go to the United States in the spring and return in the autumn. Again, there is a str... ... Mediterranean. Italian work- men by the hundred thousand go to the United States in the spring and return in the autumn. Again, there is a stream of ... ... Europe. Compared with any European country, the whole popula- tion of the United States is fluid. Equally notable is the enor- mous proportion of the... .... Compared with any European country, the whole popula- tion of the United States is fluid. Equally notable is the enor- mous proportion of the Britis... ...national and imperial development. That greater public life which is above party and above creed and sect has, we are told, taken hold of his imaginat... ...nce then the national spirit, hampered though it is by the tradi- tions of party government and a legacy of intellectual and social heaviness, has bee... ... is an impos- sible social fragmentation. The transport service is to be a democratic republic, the mines are to be a democratic re- public, every gre... ...e mines are to be a democratic re- public, every great industry is to be a democratic republic 67 H. G . Wells within the State; our community is to ... ...of our method of voting, not one- tenth of the present American and French Senators, the French Deputies, the American Congressmen, and the En- glish ...

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Mankind in the Making

By: H. G. Wells

...ll be equally available for applica- tion in the British Empire and in the United States. T o that we must come, unless our talk of co-operation, of r... ...qually available for applica- tion in the British Empire and in the United States. T o that we must come, unless our talk of co-operation, of reunion,... ... cannot do while over here and over there men hold themselves bound by old party formulae, by loyal- ties and institutions, that are becoming, that ha... ...d devel- opment. Any collective human enterprise, institution, move- ment, party or state, is to be judged as a whole and completely, as it conduces m... ...e that the real and ultimate business, so far as this world goes, of every statesman, every social orga- nizer, every philanthropist, every business m... ...at any rate, London and the Gold Coast and, I suspect, some regions in the United States of America, receive to consume. But it will be urged that the... ... mankind in the world? How does it compare with the American conception of democratic equality, and how do both stand with regard to the essential tru... ...ater mass of our English-speaking people is living under the profession of democratic Republi- canism, there is no party, no sect, no periodical, no t... ...e would be a more difficult matter, because the method of appoint- ment of Senators is more stereotyped altogether, and, since 1800, unhappily quite b...

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Notes on Life and Letters

By: Joseph Conrad

...nterests of eternal justice (and recent friendship), does not apply to the United States of America. There, if one may believe the long and helpless i... ...s of eternal justice (and recent friendship), does not apply to the United States of America. There, if one may believe the long and helpless indignat... ...ds the introductory chapter of the story which, as the author’s dedication states, has inspired an admirable draughtsman and a skilful dramatist, each... ...il n’y a plus d’Europe!” There is, indeed, no Europe. The idea of a Europe united in the solidarity of her dynasties, which for a mo- ment seemed to d... ...ation, for the honour, for the fun of the thing. The virtuous, industrious democratic States of to-morrow may yet be reduced to fighting for a crust o... ...sible and carrying the taint of anti-social guilt. As to Russia, the third party to the crime, and the originator of the scheme, she had no national c... ... arouse her cupidity be- cause she had salt mines of her own. No doubt the democratic complexion of Polish institutions was very distasteful to the co... ...ke matters. The legislature will ratify, thus making Poland, as it were, a party in the establishment of the protectorate. A point of importance. 120... ...e difficult to say. From a cer- tain point of view the sight of the august senators of a great Power rushing to New York and beginning to bully and ba...

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The French Revolution a History Volume One

By: Thomas Carlyle

............................................................. 100 BOOK 1.IV . STATES-GENERAL ............................................................... ...k domino, like a black night-bird, and disturb the fair Antoinette’s music-party in the Park: all Birds of Paradise flying from thee, and musical wind... ... with the whole pomp of astonished intoxicated France, will be opening the States-General. Dubarrydom and its D’Aiguillons are gone forever. There is ... ...n! Finally he descends; welcomed by the universe. Duchess Polignac, with a party, is in the Bois de Boulogne, waiting; though it is drizzly winter; th... ...Espremenil, a most patriotic Oath, of the One-and-all sort, is sworn, with united throat;—an excellent new-idea, which, in these coming years, shall n... ...or after door. And now the innermost door opens; discloses the long-gowned Senators of France: a hundred and sixty- seven by tale, seventeen of them P... ...ntation, ’ that is to say, have as many members as the Noblesse and Clergy united? Shall the States-General, when once assembled, vote and deliberate,... ...igneurs d’Artois, Conti, Conde (named Court Triumvirate), they of the anti-democratic Memoire au Roi, has not their foreboding proved true? They may w... ...certain transitionary state; getting regenerated from old Monarchic to new Democratic; no Official yet knows clearly what he is. Nevertheless, Mayors ...

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The French Revolution a History

By: Thomas Carlyle

.............................................................. 76 BOOK 1.IV . STATES-GENERAL ............................................................... ...k domino, like a black night-bird, and disturb the fair Antoinette’s music-party in the Park: all Birds of Paradise flying from thee, and musical wind... ... with the whole pomp of astonished intoxicated France, will be opening the States- General. Dubarrydom and its D’Aiguillons are gone forever. There is... ...n! Finally he descends; welcomed by the universe. Duchess Polignac, with a party, is in the Bois de Boulogne, waiting; though it is drizzly winter; th... ...c Oath, of the One- 70 The French Revolution and-all sort, is sworn, with united throat;—an excellent new- idea, which, in these coming years, shall ... ...r after door. And now the innermost door opens; discloses the long- gowned Senators of France: a hundred and sixty-seven by tale, seventeen of them Pe... ...entation,’ that is to say, have as many members as the Noblesse and Clergy united? Shall the States-General, when once assembled, vote and deliberate,... ...certain transitionary state; getting regenerated from old Monarchic to new Democratic; no Official yet knows clearly what he is. Nevertheless, Mayors ... ...he Versailles Municipality (an old Monarchic one, not yet refounded into a Democratic) instantly second the proposal? Nay the very Versailles National...

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Two Years before the Mast, And Twenty-Four Years After: A Personal Narrative of Life at Sea

By: Richard Henry Dana

...a small schooner had made a good voyage, by carrying a cargo of them to the United States. We returned by sun down, and found the Loriotte at a... ... schooner had made a good voyage, by carrying a cargo of them to the United States. We returned by sun down, and found the Loriotte at anchor, ... ...alled who speak the English language) who have married Californians, become united to the Catholic church, and acquired considerable property. Havi... ...ure was chiefly turned against a large, heavy moulded fellow from the Middle States, who was called Sam. This man hesitated in his speech, and was ra... ...oot of the ladder and in desperate circumstances, just as a new political party is started by such men in our own country. The only object, of cour... ...l, it was not ten o’clock, and the night was long before us, when one of the party produced an old pack of Spanish cards from his monkey jacket pocket... ...ed; * * * * *, the mouth piece of the debating clubs, noisy, vaporous, and democratic; and so following. Then I could see them receiving their A.B... ...y. It has been found necessary to vest in every government, even the most democratic, some extraordinary, and, at first sight, alarming powers; ... ...ter, repaired my father’s house at home some ten years before; and two more Senators from southern California, relics of another age,—Don Andres Pi...

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