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People Educated at Eton College (X)

       
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The Art of Writing

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...niver- sity. This Portable Document file is furnished free and without any charge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, ... ...e sense finer than we conceive, and hints of ancient harmo- *First published in the Contemporary Review, April 1885 4 Robert Louis Stevenson nies in ... ...r. But it must not be forgotten that in some languages this element is almost, if not quite, extinct, and that in our own it is probably decay- ing. T... ... on all with the same ungenerous hand; they begin the consideration of all, in young and unprepared minds, in an unworthy spirit; on all, they supply ... ...d wholesome and beautiful elements of our life; he should tell unsparingly of the evil and sorrow of the present, to move us with instances: he should... ...ged to Robinson Crusoe. No doubt the skeleton is con- veyed from Poe. I think little of these, they are trifles and details; and no man can hope to ha... ...ad passed a landmark; I had finished a tale, and written ‘The End’ upon my manuscript, as I had not done since ‘The Pentland Rising,’ when I was a boy... ...adventures of Treasure Island are not yet quite at an end. I had written it up to the map. The map was the chief part of my plot. For instance, I had ...

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A Tramp Abroad

By: Mark Twain

...is Portable Document file is furnished free and without any charge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way d... ...e of them, and as such is a part of the Pennsylvania State University’s Electronic Classics Series. Cover design: Jim Manis, (photo of Twain in the l... ...he carpetway clear. Nobody moved or spoke any more but only waited. In a short time the shrill piping of a coming train was heard, and immediately gro... ...e lofty Neckar hills to their beguiling and im- pressive charm in any country; but German legends and fairy tales have given these an added charm. The... ...for himself whether he will work or play; for German university life is a very free life; it seems to have no re- straints. The student does not live ... ...arp pain the hurts were inflicting. This was good fortitude, indeed. Such endur- ance is to be expected in savages and prize-fighters, for they are bo... ...nce. The cellar had two feet of stagnant water in it, and was bottomed with six inches of soft mud. But I wander from the point. It was the subject of... ... tan-yard a fortnight before his death. The fifty dollars had gone promptly for whiskey and had considerably hurried up the change of ownership in the... ...ould be so divinely beautiful. The great crowd which the “Fremersberg” had called out was another evidence that it was low-grade music; for only the f...

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Life of John Coleridge Patteson : Missionary Bishop of the Melanesian Islands

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...wn opinions; being quite convinced that not only should a biographer never at- tempt either to twist or conceal the sentiments of the sub- ject, but t... ...Norfolk family, and was born at Coney Weston, on February 11, 1790. He was educated at Eton, and there formed more than one friendship, which not only... ...ly, and was born at Coney Weston, on February 11, 1790. He was educated at Eton, and there formed more than one friendship, which not only lasted thro... ...ionate association to be handed on to succeeding generations. The thorough Etonian impress, with all that it involved, was of no small account in his ... ... in his life, as well as in that of his son. The elder John Patteson was a colleger, and passed on to King’s College, Cambridge, whence, in 1813, he c... ...arnest wish to be a clergyman, because he thought saying the Absolution to people must make them so happy, ‘a belief he must have gleaned from his Pra... ...ng out to found a church, and then to die neglected and forgotten. All the people burst out crying, he was so very much beloved by his parishioners. H... ...tone through life, and became apparent in his sermons when he addressed an educated audience. Here is a letter to his eldest sister: ‘The weather has ...

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In the Days of the Comet

By: H. G. Wells

...person using this docu- ment file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...WER WER WER WER WER I saw a gray-haired man, a figure of hale age, sitting at a desk and writing: He seemed to be in a room in a tower, very high, so ... ...ering of a palace, of a terrace, of the vista of a great roadway with many people, people exaggerated, im- possible-looking because of the curvature o... ... Change, so far as it has affected my own life and the lives of one or two people closely connected with me, primarily to please myself. Long ago in m... ... has been in most things accomplished, in a time when every one is be- ing educated to a sort of intellectual gentleness, a gentleness that abates not... ...the Days of the Comet my time, I was ill clothed, ill fed, ill housed, ill educated and ill trained, my will was suppressed and cramped to the pitch o... ...ndred altogether, including the reverend gentleman’s photograph albums and college and school text- books. This suggestion of learning was enforced by... ...passed from nurse to governess, from governess to preparatory school, from Eton to Oxford, from Oxford to the politico-social routine. Even their vice... ... tions of good form. They had all gone to the races surrepti- tiously from Eton, had all cut up to town from Oxford to see life—music-hall life—had al...

...Excerpt: I saw a gray-haired man, a figure of hale age, sitting at a desk and writing: He seemed to be in a room in a tower, very high, so that through the tall window on his left one perceived only distances, a remote horizon of sea, a headland and that vague haze and glitter in the suns...

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Memorials and Other Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...the eyes of those who have taken an interest in the original se- ries. But at all events, good or bad, they are now tendered to the appropriation of y... ... any, had been already tried for me vicariously amongst the Ameri- cans; a people so nearly repeating our own in style of intel- lect, and in the comp... ...rciful bloodshed”—In reading either the later religious wars of the Jewish people under the Maccabees, or the ear- lier under Joshua, every philosophi... ...als, and Other Papers helpers. Lord Carbery, who had received an elaborate Etonian education, was even more earnestly a student than his friend Lord M... ...ore earnestly a student than his friend Lord Massey, who had probably been educated at home un- der a private tutor. He read everything connected with... ..., in the persons of their children, meeting for study at the same schools, colleges, military academies, &c.; by what furious forgetfulness of the rea... ... visits dur- ing his imprisonment. But the robber represented by the skel- eton in Mr. White’s museum (whom let us call X, since his true name has per... ...ing composed of those who are “noble;” the other, of families equally well educated and accomplished, but not, in the continental sense, “noble.” The ...

...motion. Some of these new papers, I hope, will not be without their value in the eyes of those who have taken an interest in the original series. But at all events, good or bad, they are now tendered to the appropriation of your individual house, the Messrs. Ticknor & Fields, according to the amplest extent of any power to make such a transfer that I may be found to posses...

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The Soul of a Bishop

By: H. G. Wells

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State Uni- versity nor Jim... ...was inaudible. Behind him the little rufous man with the big eyes twitched at his robe and offered suggestions. And behind these two clustered a great... ...hanical ex- pert of some sort, a railway peer, geniuses, hairy and Celtic, people of no clearly definable position, but all quite unequal to the task ... ...h and reality. London had not disillusioned him. It was a strange waste of people, it made him feel like a mis- sionary in infidel parts, but it was a... ...ings have gone further than that. She seems to think—that she is not being educated properly here, that she ought to go to a College. As if we were ke... ...nk—that she is not being educated properly here, that she ought to go to a College. As if we were keeping things from her….” The bishop reconsidered h... ...ixteen hundred or two thousand five hun- dred years ago…. the increasingly educated and practical- minded working classes will not come to church, wee... ... not know that her own eldest son, a dark, romantic-looking youngster from Eton, had also come to the theological stage of development. She did how- e... ...ned to? Why for instance must you insist on the T rinity?” “Yes,” said the Eton boy explosively, and flushed darkly to find he had spoken. “Here is a ...

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What Is Man and Other Essays of Mark Twain

By: Mark Twain

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ..................................................................... ... 125 AT THE SHRINE OF ST. WAGNER .................................................. ...the Bessemer furnace and refines it into steel of the first quality. It is educated, now —its training is complete. And it has reached its limit. By n... ...s complete. And it has reached its limit. By no possible process can it be educated into gold. Will you set that down? Y.M. Yes. “Everything has its l... ...g. He correctly observed, and he marvelously painted. He exactly portrayed people whom God had cre ated; but he created none himself. Let us spare h... ...orm it. Mark T wain 19 O.M. But there is here and there a man who would. People, for instance, like the man who lost his life trying to save the chi... ...hine Note.—When Mrs. W. asks how can a millionaire give a single dollar to colleges and museums while one human being is destitute of bread, she has a... ...like the one blind man where all others see; the one groping savage in the college of the learned, and always, during service, I feel like a heretic i... ...l time! It is the very way Professor Osborn and I built the colossal skel eton brontosaur that stands fifty seven feet long and six teen feet high i...

............ 118 SWITZERLAND, THE CRADLE OF LIBERTY ................................................................................................ 125 AT THE SHRINE OF ST. WAGNER ..................................................................................................................... 135 WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS .........................................................

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Confessions of an English Opium-Eater

By: Thomas de Quincey

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...t an anxious review of the rea- sons for and against this step that I have at last concluded on taking it. Guilt and misery shrink, by a natural insti... ...hought the subject of too delicate a nature to be made common; and as many people might then indiscriminately use it, it would take from that neces- s... ...rnishing a key to some parts of that tremendous scen- ery which afterwards peopled the dreams of the Opium-eater. 3. As creating some previous interes... ... an ancient founda- tion. This man had been appointed to his situation by— College, Oxford, and was a sound, well-built scholar, but (like most men wh... ... sound, well-built scholar, but (like most men whom I have known from that college) coarse, clumsy, and inelegant. A miserable contrast he presented, ... ...umsy, and inelegant. A miserable contrast he presented, in my eyes, to the Etonian brilliancy of my favourite master; and beside, he could not disguis... ...catholic creature, and as stand- ing in equal relation to high and low, to educated and un- educated, to the guilty and the innocent. Being myself at ... ... chief (or rather only) confidential friend. These letters were dated from Eton. I had also some from the Marquis of —, his father, who, though absorb...

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Autobiographic Sketches Selections, Grave and Gay

By: Thomas de Quincey

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ... to be more or less advantageous to the collection, it is my wish to place at your disposal as soon as possible, in order that you may make what use o... ...shed in a journal dedicated to purposes of politi- cal change such as many people thought revolutionary. I thought so myself, and did not go along wit... ...ular—but many of my readers will know it for a truth— that vast numbers of people, though liberated from all rea- sonable motives to self-restraint, c... ...7. a second Jane; 8. Henry, a posthumous child, who belonged to Brazennose College, Oxford, and died about his twenty-sixth year. 2 Cicero, in a well... ...ar School 1 of Bath, over which at that time presided a most accomplished Etonian—Mr. (or was he as yet Doctor?) Morgan. If he was not, I am sure he ... ... allowed me to accept it. In the spring of 1800, accordingly, I went up to Eton, for the purpose of joining my friend. Here I several times visited th... ...thing of the same bitter spirit. But the great body of the richer and more educated inhabitants showed the most hos- pitable attention to all who just... ...s it must have done in most other parts of North America; that the boy was educated and trained as a missionary clergy- man; and finally, that he is n...

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Of Human Bondage

By: Somerset Maugham

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...which a child was sleeping and drew the curtains. She glanced mechanically at the house opposite, a stucco house with a portico, and went to the child... ... be fortified for the evening service. V PHILIP CAME gradually to know the people he was to live with, and by fragments of conversation, some of it no... ...nd the little harbor were shabby streets in which lived fishermen and poor people; but since they went to chapel they were of no account. When Mrs. Ca... ... in the school whose fa- thers, grandfathers, great-grandfathers, had been educated there and had all been rectors of parishes in the diocese of Terca... ...ent out of his way to express his satis- faction that he was going to that college. He pre- pared himself for a distinguished career. He moved in the ... ... he fancied he saw in Philip. He sneered at Philip because he was bet- ter educated than himself, and he mocked at Philip’s pronunciation; he could no... ...had persuaded his people to let him come and study art instead of going to college; but at the end of that period he was to return to Seattle and go i... ...r battle, Magersfontein, Colenso, Spion Kop, lost on the playing fields of Eton, had humiliated the nation and dealt the death-blow to the prestige of...

...awness in the air that suggested snow. A woman servant came into a room in which a child was sleeping and drew the curtains. She glanced mechanically at the house opposite, a stucco house with a portico, and went to the child?s bed....

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Moby Dick; Or the Whale

By: Herman Melville

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ... book whatsoever, sacred or profane. Therefore you must not, in every case at least, take the higgledy-piggledy whale statements, however authentic, i... ...— Montgomery’ s World before the Flood. “Io! Paean! Io! sing. To the finny people’s king. Not a mightier whale than this In the vast Atlantic is; Not ... ...me from deliberately stepping into the street, and methodically knock- ing people’s hats off—then, I account it high time to get to sea as soon as I c... ...s the veriest of all trifles—Cap- tain Bildad had not only been originally educated according to the strictest sect of Nantucket Quakerism, but all hi... ...ll listen. Mark ye, be forewarned; Ahab’s above the common; Ahab’s been in colleges, as well as ‘mong the cannibals; been used to deeper wonders than ... ...ibe all the honour and the glory to whaling; for a whale-ship was my Y ale College and my Harvard. CHAPTER 25 Postscript I N BEHALF OF THE DIGNITY OF ... ...ing Tranquo’s. In both cases, the stranded whales to which these two skel- etons belonged, were originally claimed by their proprietors upon similar g... ...pey’s Pillar. There are forty and odd vertebrae in all, which in the skel- eton are not locked together. They mostly lie like the great knobbed blocks...

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The War of the Worlds

By: H. G. Wells

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State Uni- versity nor Jim... ...t is curious to re- call some of the mental habits of those departed days. At most terrestrial men fancied there might be other men upon Mars, perhaps... ...ons of miles it was from us—more than forty millions of miles of void. Few people realise the im- mensity of vacancy in which the dust of the material... ...elow in the darkness were Ottershaw and Chertsey and all their hundreds of people, sleeping in peace. He was full of speculation that night about the ... ...had arisen at the Horse Guards. The ordinary sapper is a great deal better educated than the common soldier, and they dis- cussed the peculiar conditi... ...starting out upon the lawn, I saw the tops of the trees about the Oriental College burst into smoky red flame, and the tower of the little church be- ... ...to ruin. The pinnacle of the mosque had vanished, and the roof line of the college itself looked as if a 34 The War of the Worlds hundred-ton gun had... ...t man left alive. Hard by the top of Putney Hill I came upon another skel- eton, with the arms dislocated and removed several yards from the rest of t...

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American Notes for General Circulation

By: Charles Dickens

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk . Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim ... ...se past eight years, or whether there is anything in its present position, at home or abroad, which suggests that those influences and tendencies real... ...art shock before com ing below, which, but that we were the most sanguine people living, might have prepared us for the worst. The imaginative artist... ... little washing slab as standing room, — we could manage to insinuate four people into it, all at one time; and entreating each other to observe how v... ...rity of those who are attached to the liberal professions there, have been educated at this same school. Whatever the defects of American universities... ...and instruction, recognise a world, and a broad one too, lying beyond the college walls. American Notes – Dickens 30 It was a source of inexpressib... ... their working more than nine months in the year, and require that they be educated during the other three. For this purpose there are schools in Lowe... ... rows of grand old elm trees; and the same natural ornaments surround Yale College, an establishment of considerable eminence and reputa tion. The va... ...e; one something on wheels like an amateur carrier’s cart; one double pha eton of great antiquity and unearthly construction; one gig with a great ho...

...her there has been anything in the public career of that country during these past eight years, or whether there is anything in its present position, at home or abroad, which suggests that those influences and tendencies really do exist....

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David Copperfield Volume One Chapters One through Twenty-Eight

By: Charles Dickens

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...the reader little, perhaps, to know, how sorrowfully the pen is laid down at the close of a two-years imaginative task; or how an Author feels as if... ... in the newspapers, at the low price of fifteen guineas. Whether sea-going people were short of money about that time, or were short of faith and pref... ... t cry! said Miss Betsey. You were not equally matched, child if any two people can be equally matched and so I asked the question. You were an orph... ... upon the desk, and was re- lieving himself as usual with a burst of skel- etons, said he didn t care. Mr. Mell was ill-used. Who has ill-used him, y... ...er I need not recall when. And how do you get on, and where are you being educated, Brooks? said Mr. Quinion. He had put his hand upon my shoulder, ... .... Murdstone. He is at home at present, said the latter. He is not being educated anywhere. I don t know what to do with him. He is a difficult subj... ...of punch with an air of great enjoyment and satisfaction, and whistled the College Hornpipe. I did not fail to assure him that I would store these pre... ...le tune on his chin as he walked on, with the two forefingers of his skel- eton right hand, he added: There are expressions, you see, Master Copperfi...

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The Great Stone Face : And Other Tales of the White Mountains

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...a boy is born whose features gradually assume the aspect of that portrait. At some critical juncture the resemblance is found to be perfect. A prophec... ... spacious that it con tained many thousand inhabitants. Some of these good people dwelt in log huts, with the black forest all around them, on the ste... ...in short, were numerous, and of many modes of life. But all of them, grown people and children, had a kind of famil 6 TheGreatStone Face iarity with... ...ad disappeared before his death, leaving nothing of him but a living skel eton, covered over with a wrinkled, yellow skin. Since the melting away of ... ...t world, beyond the limits of the valley in which he had dwelt so quietly. College professors, and even the active men of cities, came from far to see... ...ay intrude. But this evening a prophetic sympathy impelled the refined and educated youth to pour out his heart before the simple mountaineers, and co...

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The Professor

By: Charlotte Brontë

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...d and redundant composition, and come to prefer what was plain and homely. At the same time I had adopted a set of principles on the subject of incide... ...n old school acquaintance:— “Dear Charles, “I think when you and I were at Eton together, we were neither of us what could be called popular character... ... choose to listen, how the world has wagged with me. “First, after leaving Eton, I had an interview with my ma- ternal uncles, Lord Tynedale and the H... ...trial. What can you do? Do you know anything besides that useless trash of college learning—Greek, Latin, and so forth?” “I have studied mathematics.”... ...of respect to the peerage, oppose at every step the advancing power of the people, support your rotten order, and be ready for its sake to wade knee-d... ...y it if you dare.” “Oh, I shall not deny it! And if Hunsden hounded on the people to hiss you, he did quite right. You deserve popular execration; for... ... Isles, where Juanna had been born and whence she was sent to Europe to be educated. I wonder that any one, looking at that girl’s head and counte- na... ...nly wanted firmness, and assurance, to be the counterpart of what any well-educated lady in Essex or Middlesex might have enounced, yet the speaker or...

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Miscellaneous Essays

By: Thomas de Quincey

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...e University is an equal opportunity university. Contents On the Knocking at the Gate, in Macbeth....................................................... ...e human mind, and the most to be distrusted; and yet the great majority of people trust to nothing else; which may do for ordinary life, but not for p... ... corresponding improve- ment. Practice and theory must advance pari passu. People begin to see that something more goes to the composition of a fine m... ... it seem so droll. One, is, the horrid panic or “funk,” (as the men of 19 Eton call it,) in which Des Cartes must have found himself upon hearing thi... ... reign which was notoriously favorable to the arts generally. She lived in College Green, with a single maid-servant, neither of them having any prete... ... seek him in chapels and consecrated oratories. This peasant girl was self-educated through her own natu- ral meditativeness. If the reader turns to t... ...wo thousand resident 3 in Oxford, and dis- persed through five-and-twenty colleges. In some of these the custom permitted the student to keep what ar...

...Excerpt: From my boyish days I had always felt a great perplexity on one point in Macbeth. It was this: the knocking at the gate, which succeeds to the murder of Duncan, produced to my feelings an effect for which I never could account. The effect was, that it reflected back upon the murder a peculiar awfulness and a depth of solemnity; yet...

...Contents On the Knocking at the Gate, in Macbeth....................................................4 On Murder, Considered as One of the Fine Arts .........................................9 LECTURE.......................................................

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Love and Mr. Lewisham

By: H. G. Wells

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...agonist does not certainly appear until the third—and Mr. Lewisham is seen at his studies. It was ten years ago, and in those days he was assistant ma... ...ending not to know gave her something to say. Mr. Lewisham nodded. “Of all people! Then”—frankly—”you have just found me out.” “I am afraid I have,” s... ...“It is nothing—it’s the proper thing for me to do, you know.” “But so many people won’t do it. Schoolmasters are not usually so—chivalrous.” He was ch... ...He bowed to her receding back, made a seventeenth-cen- tury sweep with his college cap, and then some hitherto un- explored regions of his mind flashe... ...- ful,” she said. “Living a lie! How can the world grow better, when sane, educated people use their sanity and enlighten- ment to darken others? It i... ...the proprietor might. There was also a vacant curatorship in the Museum of Eton College. The typewriting business was less varied and more defi- 124 ... ...isham nite. Those were the days before the violent competition of the half-educated had brought things down to an impos- sible tenpence the thousand w... ... of things that would have affected the welcome of himself and his wife at Eton College. At the outset he was inclined to regard the South Kensington ...

...m. The opening chapter does not concern itself with Love-- indeed that antagonist does not certainly appear until the third--and Mr. Lewisham is seen at his studies. It was ten years ago, and in those days he was assistant master in the Whortley Proprietary School, Whortley, Sussex, and his wages were forty pounds a year, out of which he had to afford fifteen shillings a w...

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Our Mutual Friend

By: Charles Dickens

...per- son using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ... the strong tide met with an impedi- ment, his gaze paused for an instant. At every mooring-chain and rope, at every stationery boat or barge that spl... ...ncies. Chapter 2 THE MAN FROM SOMEWHERE MR AND MRS VENEERING were bran-new people in a bran- new house in a bran-new quarter of London. Everything abo... ... eke in silver, frosted and also thawed, a camel of all work. The Heralds’ College found out a Crusading ancestor for V e- neering who bore a camel on... ...o was inveigled by Lady Tippins (a friend of his boyhood) to come to these people’s and talk, and who won’t talk. Reflects Eugene, friend of Mortimer;... ...they wouldn’t, to the man from Somewhere. Being a boy of fourteen, cheaply educated at Brussels when his sister’ s expul- sion befell, it was some lit... ...m, and readily received the Boffins. He was quite a young man, expensively educated and wretch- edly paid, with quite a young wife and half a dozen qu... ...ul drawback which has told upon my heart, and almost equally upon my skel- eton), and I mean to live by my calling. Putting the same meaning into othe...

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The Deputy of Arcis

By: Honoré de Balzac

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ... the theatre of the events here related. The arrondissement of Arcis votes at Bar-sur-Aube, which is forty miles from Arcis; consequently there is no ... ...ing the T error to the famous Malin de l’Aube, the repre- sentative of the people, in order to hold possession of the estate of Gondreville. [See “ An... ...arles Keller,—a par- liamentary arrangement which renders the elect of the people subject to re-election. When Simon Giguet sounded the old notary Gre... ...ur oblivi- ous friend was willing to agree that he studied with you at the college of T ours and also that hew as the same Monsieur Dorlange who, in 1... ...week two news (to use the schoolboy phrase of my son Armand) en- tered the college of Tours. One had a charming face, the other would have been though... ...rom which issued an enormous shirt-frill of point d’Angleterre, this skel- eton had cheeks covered with a thick layer of rouge which heightened still ... ...rewd in business, Laurent Goussard, whose niece Mother Marie-des-Anges had educated gratu- itously, seemed to pique himself on the great liberality of... ...ygne, without paying a visit to Mother Marie-des-Anges, who in former days educated her daughter Berthe, now the Duchesse Georges de Maufrigneuse. But...

...he provinces, it is proper to state that the town of Arcis-sur-Aube was not the theatre of the events here related. The arrondissement of Arcis votes at Bar-sur-Aube, which is forty miles from Arcis; consequently there is no deputy from Arcis in the Chamber....

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