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River Lethe in popular culture (X)

       
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A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

By: Henry David Thoreau

...A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers by Henry David Thoreau A Penn State Electronic Classics Series Publi... ...lectronic Classics Series Publication A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers by Henry David Thoreau is a publication of the Pennsylva nia Stat... ...rge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State U... ...ntained within the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers by Henry David Thor... ...t to east; now expanded into the “tale divine” of bards, now shrunk into a popular rhyme. This is an approach to that universal lan guage which men h... ....” 52 AWeekontheConcordandMerrimackRivers One man says,— “The world’s a popular disease, that reigns Within the froward heart and frantic brains ... ...ion of the worthies of the world, betrays the narrowness of his Euro pean culture and the exclusiveness of his reading. None of her children has done... ...high Seems a calking the sky. The haze, the sun’s dust of travel, had a Lethean influence on the land and its inhabitants, and all creatures resign... ...the seed vessels of the poppy, like small goblets filled with the water of Lethe, be fore the door, but without disturbing the sluggish house hold b...

Excerpt: A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers by Henry David Thoreau

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The Poems

By: George Meredith

...rge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State U... ...ntained within the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. The Poems of George Meredith by George Meredith, the Pennsylvan... ...nwallah, Chillianwallah! ’Tis a village dark and low, By the bloody Jhelum river Bridged by the foreboding foe; And across the wintry water He is read... ...Yonder look! yoho! yoho! Nancy is off!’ the farmer cried, Advancing by the river side, Red-kerchieft and brown-coated;—’So, My girl, who else could le... ... sung, Regeneration to the young, Reverberation of the truth, And virtuous culture unto youth! Youth! in whose season let abound All flowers and fruit... ... wondering to the bed. 145 ‘Now kiss me, dear! it may be, now!’ she said. Lethe had passed those lips, and he knew all. L Thus piteously Love closed ... ...friend so? Good sir, your wit is bright; But wit that strives to speak the popular voice, Puts on its nightcap and puts out its light. Curfew, would s... ...ool surcharged, propelled, unwarned; Not viler, you hear him protest: Of a popular countenance not incorrect. But deeds are the picture in essence, de...

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The French Revolution a History Volume Three

By: Thomas Carlyle

...rge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State U... ...ntained within the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. The French Revolution: A History (Volume Three) by Thomas Carly... ...om behind ditches, death-vol- leys bursting out of thickets and ravines of rivers; huts burn- ing, feet of the pitiful women hurrying to refuge with t... ...by Guards at each end: all Citizens are ordered to be within doors. On the River float sentinal barges, lest we escape by water: the Barriers her- met... ...tone, read and recited crime after crime: dictatorial tem- per, exclusive popularity, bullying at elections, mob-reti- nue, September Massacres;—till... ...his moment, had not that same great Nether Deep, of Bedlam, Fanaticism and Popular wrath and mad- ness, risen unfathomable on the Tenth of August? Fre... ...rench Revolution - V olume Three The men were men of parts, of Philosophic culture, decent behaviour; not condemnable in that they were Pedants and ha... ...Plutonic Judges, Plu- tonic Tinville; encircled, nine times, with Styx and Lethe, with Fire-Phlegethon and Cocytus named of Lamentation! The very witn...

........................................................................................................................... 21 Chapter 3.1.IV. September in Paris. ............................................................................................................................... 24 Chapter 3.1.V. A Trilogy. .............................................................

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The Divine Comedy Volume 1 Hell

By: Dante Aligheri

...rge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State U... ...ntained within the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. The Divine Comedy, Volume One, Hell [The Inferno] by Dante Alig... ...n.—Nessus.—The Riv essus.—The Riv essus.—The Riv essus.—The Riv essus.—The River of Boiling B er of Boiling B er of Boiling B er of Boiling B er of Bo... ... in Cr r r r rete.—The Riv ete.—The Riv ete.—The Riv ete.—The Riv ete.—The Rivers of H ers of H ers of H ers of H ers of Hell. ell. ell. ell. ell. ...... ...I am broken by the rain. And I, wretched soul, am not alone, 1 Ciacco, in popular speech, signifies a hog. 31 Dante for all these endure like punish... ...Attila, but T otila, who in 542 besieged Florence, and, according to false popular tradition, burned it. The names and personages were frequently conf... ... bring wonder to thy face.” And I again, “Master, where are Phlegethon and Lethe found, for of the one thou art silent, and of the other thou sayest t... ...ut the boiling of the red water ought truly to solve one that thou askest. Lethe thou shalt see, but outside of this ditch, there where souls go to la... ...ing that way, the cruel virgin saw a land in the middle of the fen without culture and bare of inhabitants. There, to avoid all human fellowship, she ...

....................................... 14 HELL .............................................................................. 16 CANTO I. Dante, astray in a wood, reaches the foot of a hill which he begins to ascend; he is hindered by three beasts; he turns back and is met by Virgil, who proposes to guide him into the eternal world. ....................................... 16...

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The Divine Comedy of Dante

By: Alighieri, Dante, 1265-1321

...arge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk . Neither the Pennsylvania Stat... ...ntained within the document or for the file as an elec tronic transmission, in any way. The Divine Comedy of Dante Purgatory , Translated by H.F. C... ... shore Where Tyber’s wave grows salt, of him gain’d kind Admittance, at that river’s mouth, tow’rd which His wings are pointed, for there always thron... ...hat the land Contain’d not; and, as mightiest streams are wont, To the great river with such headlong sweep Rush’d, that nought stay’d its course. My ... ... such a growth has sprung Of rank and venom’d roots, as long would mock Slow culture’s toil. Where is good Lizio? where Manardi, Traversalo, and Carpi... ...pake me: “What from thee I hear Is grav’d so deeply on my mind, the waves Of Lethe shall not wash it off, nor make A whit less lively. But as now thy ... ...ools Talk on, who think the songster of Limoges O’ertops him. Rumour and the popular voice They look to more than truth, and so confirm Opinion, ere b... ...t to bring Remembrance back of every good deed done. From whence its name of Lethe on this part; On th’ other Eunoe: both of which must first Be taste... ...e more of kindly strength is in the soil, So much doth evil seed and lack of culture The Divine Comedy of Dante Purgatory 88 Mar it the more, and ...

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The Divine Comedy of Dante

By: H. F. Cary

...arge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk . Neither the Pennsylvania Stat... ...ntained within the document or for the file as an electronic trans mission, in any way. The Divine Comedy of Dante , Translated by H.F. Cary , the Pe... ...d with shame, Fearing my words offensive to his ear, Till we had reach’d the river, I from speech Abstain’d. And lo! toward us in a bark Comes on an ... ...e wrath of God, All here together come from every clime, And to o’erpass the river are not loth: For so heaven’s justice goads them on, that fear Is t... ...ooks.” Then I again inquir’d: “Where flow the streams Of Phlegethon and Lethe? for of one Thou tell’st not, and the other of that shower, Thou sa... ...’d I hear. Yet the red seething wave might have resolv’d One thou proposest. Lethe thou shalt see, But not within this hollow, in the place, Whither t... ...ed to in the Paradise, Canto II. 52. The curious reader may consult Brand on Popular Antiquities, 4to. 1813. vol. ii. p. 476. The Divine Comedy of D... ... such a growth has sprung Of rank and venom’d roots, as long would mock Slow culture’s toil. Where is good Lizio? where Manardi, Traversalo, and Carpi... ...ools Talk on, who think the songster of Limoges O’ertops him. Rumour and the popular voice They look to more than truth, and so confirm Opinion, ere b...

...Excerpt: CANTO I. In the midway of this our mortal life, I found me in a gloomy wood, astray Gone from the path direct: and e?en to tell It were no easy task, how savage wild That forest, how robust and rough its growth, Which to remember only...

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Essays

By: Ralph Waldo Emerson

...rge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State U... ...ntained within the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson, the Pennsylvania State Universit... ...ng character, yea further in every fact and circum- stance,—in the running river and the rustling corn. Praise is looked, homage tendered, love flows,... ...triots in the Retreat of the Ten Thousand. “After the army had crossed the river Teleboas in Armenia, there fell much snow, and the troops lay mis- er... ...of hundreds, whose affections must now enter into his account. There is no Lethe for this. Ah, that he could pass again into his neutrality! Who can t... ... secur- ing of his bread to each shareholder, to surrender the liberty and culture of the eater. The virtue in most re- quest is conformity. Self-rel... ... and sold; for them I will go to prison if need be; but your miscellaneous popular charities; the education at college of fools; the building of meeti... ... which by and by I shall have the manhood to withhold. Virtues are, in the popular estimate, rather the excep- tion than the rule. There is the man an... ...g to the old belief stands at the door by which we enter, and gives us the lethe to drink, that we may tell no tales, mixed the cup too strongly, and ...

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The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope

By: Gilfillan

...rge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State U... ...ntained within the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, Volume T wo, the Pennsylv... ...s religious creed, his po- litical connexions, his easy circumstances, his popularity with the upper classes, as well as his testy temper and maliciou... ...ire of Pope. He is still, with the exception, perhaps, of Cowper, the most popular poet of the eighteenth century. His “Essay on Man,” and his “Eloisa... ...lowing elements to be analysed:—His original genius—his kind and degree of culture—his purpose—his special faculties—the works he has written—and the ... ...like motion of Milton’s loftier passages; or the gliding, pausing, fitful, river-like progress of Shakspeare’s verse; or the fretted fury, and “torren... ... 200 Back to his bonds their subject sea command, And roll obedient rivers through the land; These honours, peace to happy Britain brings, Thes... ...branch of Styx here rises from the shades, That, tinctured as it runs with Lethe’s streams, 219 The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope: V ol. 2 And waf... ... led by a mad poetical Sibyl, to the Elysian shade; where, on the banks of Lethe, the souls of the dull are dipped by Bavius, before their entrance in...

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The French Revolution a History

By: Thomas Carlyle

...rge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State U... ...ntained within the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. The French Revolution: A History by Thomas Carlyle, the Pennsyl... ...ously in our mi- raculous Being, and name World.—But if the very Rocks and Rivers (as Metaphysic teaches) are, in strict language, made by those outwa... ....) the sons of the Saxon Puritans, with their Old-Saxon temper, Old-Hebrew culture, sleek Silas, sleek Benjamin, here on such errand, among the light ... ...always (as now) has his Parlement barked, cur-like at his heels; with what popular cry there might be. Were he strong, it barked before his face; hunt... ...of it satin, two-fifths of it paper, is promenaded, not in silence, to the popular judgment-bar; is doomed; shriven by a mock Abbe de Vermond; then so... ...ardest winter seen since 1709; thermometer below zero of Fahrenheit, Seine River fro- zen over. (Marmontel, Memoires (London, 1805), iv. 33. Hist. Par... ...es wander, as it were, a disconsolate ghost, on the wrong side of Styx and Lethe; his name like to outlive Caesar’s. See Bailly, likewise of Paris, ti... ...n that, what will a parch- ment Decree and Lafayette Amnesty do? Oblivious Lethe flows not above ground! Papal Aristocrats and Patriot Brigands are st...

............................................................................................................................ 27 Chapter 1.2.II. Petition in Hieroglyphs. ...................................................................................................................... 30 Chapter 1.2.III. Questionable. ...........................................................

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Essays of Michel de Montaigne Book the Second

By: William Carew Hazilitt

...e of any kind. Any person using this docu- ment file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Penn- sylvania State... ...ntained within the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. Essays of Michel de Montaigne Book the Second trans. Charles Co... ...e first of these precipitated herself with her mother and sisters into the river to avoid being forced by some soldiers, and the last also killed hers... ...hrew all the gold and whatever else the enemy could make booty of into the river Strymon, and then causing a great pile to be set on fire, and the thr... ...live that had power to destroy itself. There are infinite examples of like popular resolutions which seem the more fierce and cruel in proportion as t... ...hat is good in itself; and I believe that this rule has only regard to the popular vice. They are bits for calves, with which neither the saints whom ... ...ars and a thou- sand forms, man had spent his life, and after purgation in Lethe’s flood, at last he restores them to the primordial hu- man shapes.”—... ...the most frequent, are, for the most part, men who have little care of the culture of the soul, but that look upon honour as the sum of all blessings,...

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The French Revolution a History Volume One

By: Thomas Carlyle

...rge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State U... ...ntained within the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. The French Revolution: A History (Volume One) by Thomas Carlyle... ...lously in our miraculous Being, and name World.— But if the very Rocks and Rivers (as Metaphysic teaches) are, in strict language, made by those outwa... ...e has fled. Is Sovereignty some poor Montgolfier; which, blown into by the popular wind, grows great and mounts; or sinks flaccid, if the wind be with... ... the sons of the Saxon Puritans, with their Old-Saxon tem- per, Old-Hebrew culture, sleek Silas, sleek Benjamin, here on such errand, among the light ... ...ea- tures, how shall he, in all Philosophe-soirees, and saloons of elegant culture, become notable as a Friend of Darkness? Among the Paris Long-robes... ...lways (as now) has his Parlement barked, cur- like at his heels; with what popular cry there might be. Were he strong, it barked before his face; hunt... ...st win- ter seen since 1709; thermometer below zero of Fahren- heit, Seine River frozen over. (Marmontel, Memoires (Lon- don, 1805), iv. 33. Hist. Par... ...es wander, as it were, a disconsolate ghost, on the wrong side of Styx and Lethe; his name like to outlive Caesar’s. See Bailly, likewise of Paris, ti...

............................................................................................................................ 28 Chapter 1.2.II. Petition in Hieroglyphs. ...................................................................................................................... 34 Chapter 1.2.III. Questionable. ...........................................................

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Biographical Essays

By: Thomas de Quincey

...rge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State U... ...ntained within the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. Biographical Essays by Thomas de Quincey, the Pennsylvania Stat... ...ely intellectual. How are we to account, then, for that deluge, as if from Lethe, which has swept away so entirely the traditional me- morials of one ... ...s; but, with reference to Addison in particular, it is time to correct the popular no- tion of his literary character, or at least to mark it by sever... ...ficient in the appropriate knowledge,)— yet, that of course he had a vague popular knowledge of the mighty poet’s cardinal dramas. Accident only led u... ...between the departments of poetry which he cultivated and the merit of his culture. The first place must undoubtedly be given for ever,—it cannot be r... ...t indiscriminate? From this defect in his nature it arose, that, except by culture and by reflec- tion, Lamb had no genial appreciation of Milton. The... ...Every thing which met the eye spoke the language of elder ages; whilst the river on which the place was seated, its great fair, which still held the r...

...pt: William Shakespeare, the protagonist on the great arena of modern poetry, and the glory of the human intellect, was born at Stratford-upon- Avon, in the county of Warwick, in the year 1564, and upon some day, not precisely ascertained, in the month of April. It is certain that he was baptized on the 25th; and from that fact, combined with some shadow of a tradition, Ma...

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Speeches: Literary and Social

By: Charles Dickens

...ge of any kind. Any person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State U... ... tained within the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. Speeches: Literary and Social by Charles Dickens , the Pennsyl... ...ded by his family, and listened, for the last time, to the rippling of the river he had so well loved, over its stony bed. I pictured him to myself, f... ...ner Adam and his wife,” the benefits of such a society are obvious. In the culture of flowers there cannot, by their very nature, be anything, solitar... ... that he be not afflicted with the coxcombical idea of writing down to the popular intelligence, instead of writing the popular intelligence up to him... ...is earnest desire to do right by his readers, and to leave imaginative and popular literature as sociated with the private homes and public rights of... ... are only what might have been, and we must wait upon the tedious shore of Lethe, millions of ages, before we have existence and a name.” “And immedia... ...artner, doing all the hard work, while the fireman drank all the beer. The river was very much clearer, freer, and cleaner in those days than these; b... ... gen eral good fortune in living in these times, when the means of mental culture and improvement are presented cheaply, socially, and cheerfully, an...

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