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Records: 21 - 40 of 87 - Pages: 
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Essays

By: Michel Eyquem de Montaigne

...ces where the Portugales abated the pride of the Indians, they found some states observing this universall and inviolalile law, that what enemie soev... ...brio sibi habere videtur. -- 1 LUCRET. 1. v. 1243. A hidden power so mens states hath out-worne Faire swords, fierce scepters, signes of honours bor... ...awyers, breath- sellers, and pettifoggers, and joyned to the three ancient states, to wit, the Clergy, the Nobility, and the Communaltie; which fourt... ...uld presently linde the spring and motion of it. Our mindes have jumped so unitedly together, they have with so fervent an affection consideredof eac... ...was my man; who besides his owne report, hath many times shewed me divers Mariners and Merchants, whom hee had knowne in that voyage. So am I please... ...uperioritie he had amongst his countriemen (for he was a Captaine and our Mariners called him King), he told me it was to march foremost in any char... ...d were so rudely, churlishly, and villainously used by the passengers and marines, who besides infinite other indignites, loitred so long on the sea... ...have, that he will once more adventure to charge these re-enforced und re-united forces, and new armed wit h despite and vengeance, that durst not, ... ...law of our life. Can a man see from one same Schoole and Discipline, more united and like customes and fashions to proceed? View but the horrible im...

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North America Volume Two

By: Anthony Trollope

..................................... 164 CHAPTER IX: THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES ................................................................ .............................. 164 CHAPTER IX: THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES ....................................................................... ......................... 226 CHAPTER XI: THE LA W COURTS AND LA WYERS OF THE UNITED STATES ........................................... 242 CHAPTER XII: ... .................. 226 CHAPTER XI: THE LA W COURTS AND LA WYERS OF THE UNITED STATES ........................................... 242 CHAPTER XII: THE FIN... ...afe from invasion; and, thirdly, that it might be central alike to all the States. It was presumed, when Washington was founded, that these three adva... ...he only city of the Union that has been in an enemy’s possession since the United States became a nation. In the war of 1812 it fell into our hands, a... ... secession. The bounty to fishermen was given to create sailors, so that a marine might be provided for the nation. I need hardly show that the nation... ...or the same purpose. But Liverpool is three times the size of Chicago. The corps of clerks 276 North America V ol. 2 required for the window delivery...

................................................................................................................ 164 CHAPTER IX: THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES .................................................................... 185 CHAPTER X: THE GOVERNMENT ...................................................................................................................

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 6 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...vy,” approved 21st of December, 1861, provides: “That the President of the United States by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall have ... ...proved 21st of December, 1861, provides: “That the President of the United States by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall have the aut... ...nd such officers may, if upon the recommendation of the Presi- dent of the United States they shall receive a vote of thanks of Congress for their ser... ... officers may, if upon the recommendation of the Presi- dent of the United States they shall receive a vote of thanks of Congress for their services a... ...’S ORDER OF MILITARY EMANCIPA- TION, MAY 19, 1862. BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: A Proclamation Whereas there appears in the publi... ...R OF MILITARY EMANCIPA- TION, MAY 19, 1862. BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA: A Proclamation Whereas there appears in the public print... ...enue cutter should proceed to sea to afford pro- tection to the commercial marine, and especially the California treasure ships then on their way to t... ...day, reminding me of a supposed un- derstanding that I would furnish you a corps of 35,000 men, and asking of me the “fulfilment of this understanding... ...ich is in the following words, viz.: “That any line officer of the navy or marine corps may be advanced one grade if upon recommendation of the Presid...

...: The third section of the ?Act further to promote the efficiency of the Navy,? approved 21st of December, 1861, provides: ?That the President of the United States by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall have the authority to detail from the retired list of the navy for the command of squadrons and single ships such officers as he may believe that the good ...

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20, 000 Leagues under the Sea

By: Jules Verne

...d America, naval officers of all countries, and the Governments of several States on the two continents, were deeply interested in the matter. For som... ...any, sailing to windward in that portion of the Atlantic lying between the United States and Europe, respectively signalled the monster to each other ... ...iling to windward in that portion of the Atlantic lying between the United States and Europe, respectively signalled the monster to each other in 42º ... ...om a scientific research in the disagreeable territory of Nebraska, in the United States. In virtue of my office as Assistant Professor in the Museum ... ...ientific research in the disagreeable territory of Nebraska, in the United States. In virtue of my office as Assistant Professor in the Museum of Natu... ...ng all other suggestions, it becomes necessary to admit the existence of a marine animal of enormous power. “The great depths of the ocean are entirel... ...g kinds, we must necessarily seek for the animal in question amongst those marine beings already classed; and, in that case, I should be disposed to a... ...m, were unanimous on this point. Public opin- ion had been pronounced. The United States were the first in the field; and in New York they made prepar... ...a cabin at your disposal. Very cordially yours, J. B. Hobson, Secretary of Marine. CHAPTER III I FORM MY RESOLUTION THREE SECONDS BEFORE the arrival o...

...Merchants, common sailors, captains of vessels, skippers, both of Europe and America, naval officers of all countries, and the Governments of several States on the two continents, were deeply interested in the matter....

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 7 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...THE HOUSE. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, that, before the first meet... ...SE. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, that, before the first meeting of ... ...show that they were regularly elected in accordance with the laws of their States respec- tively, or the laws of the United States. Approved March 3, ... ...ccordance with the laws of their States respec- tively, or the laws of the United States. Approved March 3, 1863. 7 The Writings of Abraham Lincoln: ... ... proper ones. Iowa, having an entire Union delegation, will be one of the States the attempt will be made, if upon any. The Gover- nor doubtless has... ...uant to the comity deemed to be due to friendly powers, any tobacco in the United States belonging to the government either of France, Austria, or any... ...which is in the following words, viz: That any line officer of the Navy or Marine Corps may be advanced one grade if upon recommendation of the Presid... ...red for two hundred thousand men for the military service (Army, Navy, and Marine Corps) of the United States. The proportional quotas for the differe... ...rates, all civil, military, and naval officers, all soldiers, sailors, and marines, with all loyal and law-abiding people, to convene at their usual p...

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A Footnote to History

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...it. They figure but as the three ruffi- ans of the elder play-wrights. The United States have the cleanest hands, and even theirs are not immaculate. ... ...y figure but as the three ruffi- ans of the elder play-wrights. The United States have the cleanest hands, and even theirs are not immaculate. It was ... ...hed story. And the end of it spattered the credit alike of England and the States, when this man (the premier of a friendly sovereign) was kidnapped a... ...nsulate. Malietoa supposed himself betrayed by Tamasese. Consul Churchward states with precision that the document was sold by a scribe for thirty-six... ... which long rankled in the minds of the white inhabitants, when the German marines raided the town in search of Malietoa, burst into pri- vate houses,... ...t Malietoa,” said Mataafa “but try to bring about a compromise, and form a united government.” “Very well,” said Tamasese, “leave it to me, and I will... ...They found themselves unarmed among the armed warriors of Tamasese and the marines of the German squadron, and under the guns of five strong ships. Br... ... of humanity I hereby respectfully and solemnly protest in the name of the United States of America and of the civilised world in general against the ... ...- ated the consul, and he began to deal as in an enemy’s coun- try. He had marines from the Adler to stand sentry over the consulate and parade the st...

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War and the Future; Italy, France and Britain at War

By: H. G. Wells

...are affable. I had but recently had an encounter with an imported Colonial statesman, who was being adver- tised like a soap as the coming saviour of ... ...able of understand- ing. But one could as soon have talked with one of the states- men at Madame T ussaud’s. An antiquated figure. The effect of these... ...nxious as I am to be a systematic Philistine, to express my preference for Marinetti over the Florentine British and generally to antagonise aesthetic... ...war on that level might be as tedious as the South African war. But if the United States preferred to go into Mexican affairs with what I may perhaps ... ...that level might be as tedious as the South African war. But if the United States preferred to go into Mexican affairs with what I may perhaps call a ... ...rought upon the western front. These are Britain, France, Germany, and the United States of America. Less certainly equal to the effort are Italy, Jap... ...d overseas had by comparison a certain glamour. Except that when you said “United States” to him he would draw the air sharply be- tween his teeth and... ...he spectacle of American destroyers acting as bottleholders to German sub- marines with a dazzled astonishment. “Manila,” we gasp. In England we find ... ...baffles the rest of mankind, have set themselves to destroy the mercantile marine not merely of Britain and France but of Norway and Sweden, Holland, ...

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The Note Book of an English Opium-Eater

By: Thomas de Quincey

...Williams been filled in and realized, she would have seen something in the corpse-like face, and heard something in the sinister voice, that would hav... ...m now in the slow process of superseding it is, ‘my employer.’ Now, in the United States, such an expres- sion of democratic hauteur, though disagreea... ...n the slow process of superseding it is, ‘my employer.’ Now, in the United States, such an expres- sion of democratic hauteur, though disagreeable as ... ..., he had busied himself in piling the clothes elaborately over the child’s corpse. This incident undeniably gave the character of a vindictive proceed... ...f sea-board (stretching through twenty-four hundred miles) of the American United States; may enjoy fifty years for lei- surely repentance; and may ev... ...oard (stretching through twenty-four hundred miles) of the American United States; may enjoy fifty years for lei- surely repentance; and may even die ... ... was fit for any thing, from the wooden shoon of Cambridge up to the Horse Marines. Now, on the other hand, you, common-place reader, that (as an old ... ...ot bearing the technical name of theatre) were included. All these must be united to compose a build- ing such as that which received the vast audienc... ...1 On which account, I am the more struck by the ignoble argument of those statesmen who have contended in the House of Commons that such and such cla...

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The Three Musketeers

By: Alexandre Dumas

...ers, he met in the antechamber three young men, serving in the illustrious corps into which he was soliciting the honor of being received, bearing the... ...ring, not only from all the provinces of France, but even from all foreign states, the most celebrated swordsmen. It was not uncommon for Richelieu an... ...Musketeers were much attached to their young comrade. The friendship which united these four men, and the want they felt of seeing another three or fo... ...h of whom he had before had business, and who both knew him again; so they united against him and hanged him on a tree. Then they came and boasted of ... ...l, then I shall hope for one of those events which change the destinies of states.” “If your Eminence would quote to me some one of these events in hi... ...Athos, “he whom we send must pos- sess in himself alone the four qualities united.” “But where is such a lackey to be found?” “Not to be found!” cried... ...e a judge enter to interrogate her. But no one entered except two or three marines, who brought her trunks and packages, deposited them in a cor- ner,... ...d him, shutting the door after him. One instant after, the heavy step of a marine who served as sentinel was heard in the corridor—his ax in his girdl... ...The soldier went out, leaving the dinner served. Felton was sent away. The marines were removed. Felton was then mistrusted. This was the last blow to...

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Notes on a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cairo

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...f the bay. Whether it is that the sight of land is always welcome to weary mariners, after the perils and annoyances of a voyage of three days, or whe... ...the young gentleman in the bows of the boat—the handsome young officers of marines we met sauntering in the town next day—the Scotch surgeon who board... ...on who boarded us as we weighed anchor—every man, down to the broken-nosed mariner who was drunk in a wine-house, and had “Caledonia” written on his h... ...greeable picture in my imagination; rather, perhaps, resembling the Junior United Service Club in Charles Street, by which every Londoner has passed e... ...board our ship had been battling, and which had charmed all—from our great statesman, our polished lawyer, our young Oxonian, who sighed over certain ... ...e of his subaltern, the hospi- table one-eyed Armenian, who represents the United States at Jaffa. The stars and stripes were flaunting over his terra... ...s subaltern, the hospi- table one-eyed Armenian, who represents the United States at Jaffa. The stars and stripes were flaunting over his terraces, to... ... his tattooage of the five crosses, the fellow had a picture of two hearts united, and the pathetic 112 Notes on a Journey from Cornhill to Grand Cai... ...mentioned our fellow-traveller, the Consul-General for Syria of the United States. He was a tradesman, who had made a considerable fortune, and lived ...

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Don Juan

By: George Byron

...ching, leaving still behind Something of which its masters are afraid, States to be curb’d and thoughts to be confined, Conspiracy or Congress... ...es, making history change its tune, Then spur away o’er empires and o’er states, Leaving at last not much besides chronology, Excepting the po... ... Love’s, and Night’s, and Ocean’s solitude, O’erflow’d her soul with their united power; Amidst the barren sand and rocks so rude She and her ... ... their witness, and the cave their bed, By their own feelings hallow’d and united, Their priest was Solitude, and they were wed: And they were... ... finish’d by a death, All comedies are ended by a marriage; The future states of both are left to faith, For authors fear description might ... ...weather, He caged in one huge hamper altogether. Then having settled his marine affairs, Despatching single cruisers here and there, His ves... ... and thunder ‘Nay!’ I don’t think that you used Kinnaird quite well In Marinet’s affair — in fact, ‘t was shabby, And like some other things w... ... wrong, To aid the damsel and destroy the caitiff; Opposing singly the united strong, From foreign yoke to free the helpless native: Alas... ...e vacant part? There lies the rub—and this they are but weak in. Frail mariners afloat without a chart, They run before the wind through hig...

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The Pioneers Or, The Sources of the Susquehanna a Descriptive Tale

By: James Fenimore Cooper

... until, uniting their streams, they form one of the proudest rivers of the United States. The mountains are generally arable to the tops, although ins... ... uniting their streams, they form one of the proudest rivers of the United States. The mountains are generally arable to the tops, although instances ... ...a wilderness. Very soon after the establishment of the independence of the States by the peace of 1783, the enterprise of their citizens was directed ... ...te to which we have alluded. *Sleigh is the word used in every part of the United States to denote a traineau. It is of local use in the west of Engla... ...hich we have alluded. *Sleigh is the word used in every part of the United States to denote a traineau. It is of local use in the west of England, whe... ...the commencement of agriculture. These spots were sometimes, by the aid of united labor, enlarged 32 The Pioneers into what were called settlements, ... ...st’ard; and I was below, mixing a toothful of hot stuff for the captain of marines, who dined, dye see, in the cabin, that there very same day; and I ... ...e medicine chest for a cure; for, as I thought the brew was spoilt for the marine’s taste, and there was no telling when another sea might come and sp... ...mes Fenimore Cooper or he must have made a valuable officer to the British marine. It is no wonder that they overcame the French so easily on the wate...

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Vanity Fair

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

.... It is blowing fresh. The music rises and whistles louder and louder; the mariners go across the stage staggering, as if the ship was in severe motio... ...quare, to several young men of the regiment, and a number of ladies of the corps de ballet, and old Mac, who was at home with people of all ages and r... ...s now nearly fifty years of age, twenty-four of which he had passed in the corps, he had a singular museum. He was one of the best shots in England, a... ...y boy, and neither of us ride so light as we did when we first entered the corps.” With which, and leaving the Colonel to dress himself, Macmurdo turn... ...o the most monstrous crimes and occasions the greatest misfortunes both in States and Fami- lies. As a selfish man will impoverish his family and ofte... ...ose mermaids are about no good, and we had best not ex- amine the fiendish marine cannibals, revelling and feasting on their wretched pickled victims.... ...s most brilliant ornaments, and En- gland one of her loftiest patriots and statesmen,” &c., &c. His will was a good deal disputed, and an attempt was ... ...r the baths were the most produc- tive periods of the Doctor’s practice—he united business with pleasure, and his chief place of resort was Ostend, wh...

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Memorials and Other Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...y of this little novel to a beautiful girl of seventeen, the daughter of a statesman in Westmoreland, not designing any deception (nor so much as any ... ...ency to lawless and gigantesque ideals of adventur- ous life; under which, united with the duelling code of Eu- rope, many things would become trivial... ... the dispute threw the decision at length upon the archives of the Spanish Marine. Those for the southern ports of Spain had been transferred, I belie... ... a sentiment as pity, in the fact of both from so early an age having been united in the calamity of orphan- age,—go where they might, these young wom... ...easonably, that possibly the 66 Memorials, and Other Papers same learning united with the same zeal might not revolve as a matter of course in the ev... ...ese arid Hebrew studies, I read to her, with a beating heart, “The Ancient Mariner.” It had been first published in 1798; and, about this time (1801),... ...o remember, she laughed at the finest parts, and shocked me by calling the mariner himself “an old quiz;” protesting that the latter part of his homil... ...th, concentrated in a small number of hands, exists in various continental states upon a larger scale than with us, moderately large estates, on the o... ...- lending friend could exist “in Oxford-street;” and, at the same time, he states, as circumstances drawn from my descrip- tion, but, in fact, pure co...

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What Is Man and Other Essays of Mark Twain

By: Mark Twain

... as well as English, and that answered very well. English and alien poets, statesmen, artists, heroes, battles, plagues, cataclysms, revolutions—we sh... ...grew with a rush; it brought inspiration and cheer with it. Midnight saw a united community, full of zeal and pluck, and with a clearly defined and we... ...is secure. The commercial millionaire may become a beggar; the illustrious statesman can make a vital mistake and be dropped and forgotten; the illust... ... Spain. America consists from north to south about five hundred miles. The United States is quite a small country compared with some other countrys, b... ... America consists from north to south about five hundred miles. The United States is quite a small country compared with some other countrys, but it a... ... with some other countrys, but it about as industrious. The capital of the United States is Long Island. The five seaports of the U.S. are Newfunlan a... ...Boatswain! BOATSWAIN. Here, master; what cheer? MASTER. Good, speak to the mariners: fall to ‘t, yarely, or we run ourselves to ground; bestir, besti... ...fall to ‘t, yarely, or we run ourselves to ground; bestir, bestir! ( Enter Mariners .) BOATSWAIN. Heigh, my hearts! cheerly, cheerly, my hearts! yare,... ...uaintance with the technicalities of other crafts and callings, notably of marine and military affairs, was also extraordinary, and yet no one has sus...

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Life on the Mississippi

By: Mark Twain

...er has so vast a drainage basin: it draws its water supply from twenty eight States and T erritories; from Dela ware, on the Atlantic seaboard, and f... ...e in the New Orleans ‘Times Democrat,’ based upon reports of able engineers, states that the river annually empties four hundred and six million tons ... ...te man who ever saw the Mississippi River, saw it in 1542, is a remark which states a fact without interpreting it: it is something like giv ing the ... ...of them that you are allowed to run at all down stream. There’s a law of the United States against it. The river may be rising by the time we get to 1... ..., he promptly resented even the merest sugges tions. Indeed, the law of the United States forbade him to listen to commands or suggestions, rightly c... ...ould get a pilot’s license for him by signing an application directed to the United States Inspector. Noth ing further was needed; usually no questio... ...—left him at the wheel, at the foot of 63, to run off the watch. The ancient mariner went up through the chute, and down the river outside; and up the... ...county seat of a great and impor tant county; town with a big United States marine hospital; town of innumerable fights—an inquest every day; town wh... ...ad ever set his foot in a pilot house! Many and many a time did this ancient mariner appear on the scene in the above fashion, and spread disaster and...

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The Trial or More Links of the Daisy Chain

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...e bump when she comes home. Oh! when will our poor remnants be once more a united family? and when shall I get into Cocksmoor school again?’ When Dr. ... ...of times shall ever shock”!’ and he began to hum it. ‘That is the Sicilian Mariners’ hymn,’ said Averil. ‘I can sing you that whenever you please.’ ‘T... ...Let me introduce you to Captain Ernescliffe, of the Dorset Volunteer Rifle Corps; Private Thomas May, of the Cambridge University Corps; and Mr. Aubre... ...aid Ethel. ‘She was the daughter of Mrs. Ledwich’s brother, the Colonel of Marines, and used in old times to be with her aunt; there used to be urgent... ... dark for taking aim, he and the weapon were so thor- 111 Yo n g e oughly united, that no further difficulty remained but of getting out his thanks t... ...tified at having the charge of him all to himself, and considered that the united influence of member and mayor must prevail. Dr. Spencer, on the cont... ...ton friend, who, while quartered in Canada, had made excur- sions into the States, and acquired such impressions as high- bred young officers were apt... ...matters before your brother that might dissuade him from making the United States his home. You have justly more influence than I. Will you object to ... ...on the eve of civil war? He laughed the idea to scorn. How could the rebel states make war, with a population of negroes sure to rise against their ma...

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Moby Dick; Or the Whale

By: Herman Melville

..., Fishes of every colour, form, and kind; Which language cannot paint, and mariner Had never seen; from dread Leviathan To insect millions peopling ev... ... By Owen Chace of Nantucket, First Mate of said vessel. New York, 1821. “A mariner sat in the shrouds one night, The wind was pip- ing free; Now brigh... ...n something like this: “Grand Contested Election for the Presidency of the United States. “Whaling V oyage by One Ismael. “Bloody Battle in Affghanist... ...hing like this: “Grand Contested Election for the Presidency of the United States. “Whaling V oyage by One Ismael. “Bloody Battle in Affghanistan.” Th... ...s heard in the entry; the door was flung open, and in rolled a wild set of mariners enough. Enveloped in their shaggy watch coats, and with their head... ... slabs laced together, mutually sloped towards each other, and at the apex united in a tufted point, where the loose hairy fibres waved to and fro lik... ...pon which Linnaeus would fain have banished the whales from the waters, he states as follows: “On account of their warm bilocular heart, their lungs, ... ...Coffin, of Nantucket, both messmates of mine in a certain voyage, and they united in the opinion that the reasons set forth were altogether insufficie... ...ow? Or, to the unread, unsophisticated Protestant of the Middle Ameri- can States, why does the passing mention of a White Friar or a White Nun, evoke...

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Moby-Dick or the Whale

By: Herman Melville

...e, Fishes of every color, form, and kind; Which language cannot paint, and mariner Had never seen; from dread Leviathan To insect millions peopling ev... ...” By Owen Chase of Nantucket, first mate of said vessel. New York. 1821. “A mariner sat on the shrouds one night, The wind was piping free; Now bright,... ...n something like this: “Grand Contested Election for the Presidency of the United States. “WHALING VOYAGE BY ONE ISHMAEL. “BLOODY BATTLE IN AFFGHANIST... ...hing like this: “Grand Contested Election for the Presidency of the United States. “WHALING VOYAGE BY ONE ISHMAEL. “BLOODY BATTLE IN AFFGHANISTAN.” Th... ...as heard in the entry; the door was flung open, and in rolled a wild set of mariners enough. Enveloped in their shaggy watch coats, and with their head... ... slabs laced together, mutually sloped towards each other, and at the apex united in a tufted point, where the loose hairy fibres waved to and fro like... ...pon which Linnaeus would fain have banished the whales from the waters, he states as follows: “On account of their warm bilocular heart, their lungs, ... ... Coffin, of Nantucket, both messmates of mine in a certain voyage, and they united in the opinion that the reasons set forth were altogether insufficien... ...snow? Or, to the unread, unsophisticated Protestant of the Middle American States, why does the passing mention of a White Friar or a White Nun, evoke...

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Vanity Fair

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

... and so descended to the grave, after two bailiffs had quarrelled over his corpse. Rebecca was seventeen when she came to Chiswick, and was bound over... ... not particularly lively—but he paraded twice before the box where the now united couples were met, and nobody took any no- tice of him. Covers were l... ...tate. He was high sheriff, and rode in a golden coach. Great ministers and statesmen courted him; and in V anity Fair he had a higher place than the m... ...f women. She had pictures of Mr. Fox in every room in the house: when that statesman was in opposition, I am not sure that she had not flung a main wi... ...Sir Pitt was brought to change his views after the death of the great Whig statesman. This worthy old lady took a fancy to Rawdon Crawley when a boy, ... ...itors would have come rushing on him in a body, had they known that he was united to a woman without 168 V anity Fair fortune. “My relations won’t cr... ...ho were the correspondents of your late lamented father. Y ou’ll find us a united, simple, happy, and I think I may say respected, family—a plain tabl... .... It is blowing fresh. The music rises and whistles louder and louder; the mariners go across the stage staggering, as if the ship was in severe motio... ...ose mermaids are about no good, and we had best not ex- amine the fiendish marine cannibals, revelling and feasting on their wretched pickled victims....

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