Search Results (71 titles)

Searched over 7.2 Billion pages in 1.28 seconds

 
People Educated at Eton College (X) English (X) Law (X) Penn State University's Electronic Classics (X) Literature (X)

       
1
|
2
|
3
|
4
Records: 41 - 60 of 71 - Pages: 
  • Cover Image

Mansfield Park

By: Jane Austen

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...atness of the match, and her uncle, the lawyer, himself, allowed her to be at least three thousand pounds short of any equitable claim to it. She had ... ...d smile, became immediately the less awful character of the two. The young people were all at home, and sustained their share in the introduction very... ...better spirits with everybody else. The place became less strange, and the people less formidable; and if there were some amongst them whom she could ... ...ion might have some use. Edmund’s friendship never failed her: his leaving Eton for Oxford made no change in his kind dispositions, and only afforded ... ...y too many to leave any deficiency of information.” “Where any one body of educated men, of whatever de- nomination, are condemned indiscriminately, t... ...vy. But then, I must have a London audience. I could not preach but to the educated; to those who were capable of estimating my composition. And I do ... .... They entered Oxford, but she could take only a hasty glimpse of Edmund’s college as they passed along, and made no stop anywhere till they reached N...

... of an handsome house and large income. All Huntingdon exclaimed on the greatness of the match, and her uncle, the lawyer, himself, allowed her to be at least three thousand pounds short of any equitable claim to it....

Read More
  • Cover Image

The History of Tom Jones, A Foundling

By: Henry Fielding

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State Uni versity nor Ji... ...vate or eleemosynary treat, but rather as one who keeps a public ordinary, at which all persons are welcome for their money. In the former case, it is... ...r begot; and if your worship should provide for the child, it may make the people the apter to believe; besides, why should your worship provide for w... ...overy. The sagacious reader will not from this simile imagine these poor people had any apprehension of the design with which Mrs. Wilkins was now c... ...osed, was in no danger of becoming formidable to the learned seminaries of Eton or Westminster. To speak plainly, his scholars were divided into two c... ... a patient’s death, which sometimes occur, between the most learned of the college; and which have greatly surprized that part of the world who have b... ...ny expressed their wonder that Mr. Allworthy would suffer such a lad to be educated with his nephew, lest the morals of the latter should be corrupted... ...n whose integrity he placed much confidence. This Thwackum was fellow of a college, where he almost en tirely resided; and had a great reputation for... ...ature, they were somewhat improved and cultivated by art: for she had been educated under the care of an aunt, who was a lady of great discretion, and...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Old Curiosity Shop

By: Charles Dickens

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk . Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim ... ...der in this respect than day, which too often destroys an air built castle at the mo ment of its completion, without the least ceremony or remorse. T... ... the child for the purpose of gratifying my curiosity. I love these little people; and it is not a slight thing when they, who are so fresh from God, ... ...young gentle The Old Curiosity Shop – Dickens 21 men of Westminster and Eton, after eating vast quanti ties of apples to conceal any scent of ciga... ...ld grandfather says to the wild young grandson, ‘I have brought you up and educated you, Fred; I have put you in the way of getting on in life; you ha... ...ew so much better; that it was very wrong of her not to take the advice of people who had nothing at heart but her good; that it was next door to bein... ...clergyman’s wife, which had happened fifteen years before. He had been his college friend and always his close companion; in the first shock of his gr... ...new it, to store it in their memory. Perhaps from some vague rumour of his college honours which had been whispered abroad on his first arrival, perha...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Bleak House

By: Charles Dickens

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk . Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim ... ...Court of Chancery, though the shining subject of much popular preju dice (at which point I thought the judge’s eye had a cast in my direction), was a... ...the toes and fingers of his shivering little ‘prentice boy on deck. Chance people on the bridges peep ing over the parapets into a nether sky of fog,... ...ses. Innumerable children have been born into the cause; innumerable young people have married into it; innumerable old people have died out of it. Sc... ...d experiences. I gathered from the conversation that Mr. Skimpole had been educated for the medical profession and had once lived, in his professional... ...e since and being of some small use to her.” “The kindest physician in the college,” whispered Miss Flite to me. “I expect a judgment. On the day of j... ...e to scamper over their backs and tear out mouthfuls of their wool; but an educated, improved, developed dog who has been taught his duties and knows ... ..., Mat,” replies the other. “I would sooner take her opinion than that of a college.” “College,” returns Mr. Bagnet in short sentences, bassoon like. ... ..., principally to be found among the peachy cheeked charmers with the skel eton throats, did once occasionally say, as they toyed in a ghastly manner ...

...nd fifty men and women not laboring under any suspicions of lunacy, that the Court of Chancery, though the shining subject of much popular prejudice (at which point I thought the judge?s eye had a cast in my direction), was almost immaculate. There had been, he admitted, a trivial blemish or so in its rate of progress, but this was exaggerated and had been entirely owing t...

Read More
  • Cover Image

David Copperfield Volume Two

By: Charles Dickens

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...ID COPPERFIELD VOLUME TWO By Charles Dickens CHAPTER 29 I VISIT STEERFORTH AT HIS HOME, AGAIN I MENTIONED TO Mr. Spenlow in the morning, that I wanted... ...ied about? she replied, with provoking coldness. Oh! It was only whether people, who are like each other in their moral constitution is that the phr... ... It s as good a phrase as another, said Steerforth. Thank you: whether people, who are like each other in their moral constitution, are in greater... ...the kitchen, on going away just now, that the Col- lege of Physicians, the College of Surgeons, and Apothecaries Hall, if they were all called in to-... ...my hamper, and the gui- tar-case, in the phaeton; and, of course, the pha- eton was open; and I rode behind it, and Dora sat with her back to the hors... ... the finishing touch to that renunciation of mankind in which she had been educated, by marrying a pilot; but she decided against that venture. Not so... ...h her spine, you know. Im- mensely better! And the two youngest that Sophy educated are with us. And Louisa s here. Indeed! cried I. Yes, said Tr...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Magnum Bonum or Mother Careys Brood

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...d do a great kindness.” “Well, Joe?” “If you would have the little teacher at the Miss Heath’s here for the holidays. After all the rest, she has had ... ... seemed to charm her above all. “I always did want to know what was inside people’s windows,” she said. And in the same way it was a feast to her to g... ...en, you know. It will be always warm about my heart to know there are such people.” Mrs. Brownlow happened to overhear this little colloquy while her ... ...here might be, since he had come out triumphantly from the examination for Eton College, and had been informed that morning that there were vacancies ... ...might be, since he had come out triumphantly from the examination for Eton College, and had been informed that morning that there were vacancies enoug... ...as old as yourself.” “I sometimes think she is older! And have you seen my Eton boy?” “Was it he who received the delightful popinjay, who ‘Up and spa... ...ner almost like that of Babie herself, and yet the cleverness of a highly- educated woman. Mary Ogilvie did not wonder at what Mr. and Mrs. Acton had ... ...was poor little Caroline so ignorant as ac- tually to glory in having been educated for a governess! The Colonel, wanting to finish his Times in peace...

...said, ?An orphan?s fate Is sad and hard to bear.? --Scott ?MOTHER, you could do a great kindness.? ?Well, Joe?? ?If you would have the little teacher at the Miss Heath?s here for the holidays. After all the rest, she has had the measles last and worst, and they don?t know what to do with her, for she came from the asylum for officers? daughters, and has no home at all, and...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Best of Freshman Writing

By: Suzanne Harper

...an Writing Best of Freshman Writing Volume 8 Student Voices A Commonwealth College Publication Editor in Chief Jim Manis Editors Suzanne Harper and Li... ...y students registered in English 004, 015 and 030, within the Commonwealth College of the Pennsylvania University, during the academic year of 2002-03... ...Park students. Many campuses have student literary publica- tions as well. At the end of each fall and spring semester, we send out an email call for ... ...tyle and verified by the student’s instructor. (Please see the edito- rial at the end.) Faculty should gather the students’ pa- pers and send them in ... ...my father, mother and I arrived at our first town, and I met the different people who worked at the car- nival. Everyone was busy like programmed robo... ... a fifth leg protruding from its side. When I turned around, three strange people stood behind me with arms folded. After I explained my situation, th... ...he tilts her head towards me and smiles as she lifts up her fragile skel- eton-like hand so I can see the red rosary I made for her in school dangli... ...ach. Language such as “I think” or “I believe” has little reso- nance with educated readers unless the writer’s point is a lack of total conviction. I...

...thers for a variety of instructional purposes. Beginning with last year?s publication, we began accepting student essays from all twelve Commonwealth College campuses, from students in English 004, 015, and 030. The essays in the current edition are all from students in English 004 and 015 classes....

Read More
  • Cover Image

Speeches: Literary and Social

By: Charles Dickens

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...: Literary and Social by Charles Dickens SPEECH: EDINBURGH, JUNE 25, 1841. At a public dinner, given in honour of Mr. Dickens, and pre sided over by... ...out a thrill of gratitude and pleasure. I shall love while I have life her people, her hills, and her houses, and even the very stones of her streets.... ...—to ap peal as a stranger to your generosity and kindness as the fre est people on the earth—I could, putting some restraint upon myself, stand amon... ...ire to see in every town in England. Next, I be lieve, is the Spring Hill College, a learned institution be longing to the body of Independents, for... ... and gentlemen, this is the whole design. There are foundation scholars at Eton, foundation scholars at nearly all our old schools, and if the public,... ...ee stands the name of that eminent scholar and gentle man, the Provost of Eton. Y ou justly admire this liberal spirit, and your admiration—which I c... ...ss, a quiet modesty, and a truly Chris tian spirit; and they had all been educated in one school— Harvard University. Gentlemen, nothing was more rem... ...nces? Now, let us suppose a few. Suppose that your institution should have educated those who are now its teachers. That would be a very remarkable fa...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Greshams of Greshamsbury

By: Anthony Trollope

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...is in these days an East Barsetshire, and there is a West Barsetshire; and people conversant with Barsetshire do- ings declare that they can already d... ...as only member for East Barsetshire. Whether or not it was true, as stated at the time, that the aspect of the men with whom he was called on to assoc... ...se in Portman Square, she had worried him because he objected to have more people carried every winter at Greshamsbury Park than the house would hold;... ...the family when, in the year 1854, the eldest son came of age. He had been educated at Harrow, and was now still at Cambridge; but, of course, on such... ...chester, but had been dead now many years. He had had two sons; one he had educated as a medical man, but the other, and the younger, whom he had inte... ...d all dispute to call himself a doc- tor, according to all the laws of the colleges, made it known to the East Barsetshire world, very soon after he h... ...y. His father had deter- mined to make a gentleman of him, and had sent to Eton and Cambridge. But even this receipt, generally as it is recognized, w... ... toler- ably correct ideas on the subject. Be that as it may, two years at Eton, and three terms at Cambridge, did not make a gentleman of Louis Phili...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Joseph Andrews

By: Henry Fielding

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State Uni- versity nor Jim... ...least pretentious of men) anticipated the ver- dict which posterity almost at once, and with ever-increas- ing suffrage of the best judges as time wen... ...he original of Parson Trulliber. He was then certainly 5 Fielding sent to Eton, where he did not waste his time as regards learn- ing, and made sever... ...alled moral delinquen- cies, this attitude was so decided as to shock some people even in those days, and many in these. Just when the first sheets of... ...tical joke of the young gentlemen of Cambridge, which made Gray change his college), while dismissing these light things with patronage, had to admit ... ...ock my ears with your beastly language.” “Marry-come-up,” cries Slipslop, “people’s ears are sometimes the nicest part about them.” The lady, who bega... ...will lay down his life whenever called to that pur- pose. I am sure I have educated him in those principles; so that I have acquitted my duty, and sha... ...d, “If he had, you would have been too hard for him; I remember you at the college a very devil at this sport; I have seen you catch a freshman, for n... .... Believe me, child, all that gentleman’s misfortunes arose from his being educated at a public school.” “It doth not become me,” answered Joseph, “to...

...scribed it as ?this prodigious work,? he all unintentionally (for he was the least pretentious of men) anticipated the verdict which posterity almost at once, and with ever-increasing suffrage of the best judges as time went on, was about to pass not merely upon this particular book, but upon his whole genius and his whole production as a novelist. His work in other kinds ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby

By: Charles Dickens

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ... Sancho Panza; but I know that my first impressions of them were picked up at that time, and that they were somehow or other connected with a suppurat... ...If I were to attempt to sum up the thousands of letters, from all sorts of people in all sorts of latitudes and climates, which this unlucky paragraph... ...re attachment, who in her turn had taken him for the same reason. Thus two people who cannot afford to play cards for money, sometimes sit down to a q... ...ther people’ s. What is your daughter fit for, ma’am?’ ‘Kate has been well educated,’ sobbed Mrs Nickleby. ‘T ell your uncle, my dear, how far you wen... ...were conjuring up before him. ‘Or suppose some young nobleman who is being educated at the Hall, were to take a fancy to me, and get his father to app... ...ject to my youth, and to my not being a Master of Arts?’ ‘The absence of a college degree is an objection,’ replied Squeers, looking as grave as he co... ...ly as it could, under such adverse circum- stances. So the day wore on. At Eton Slocomb there was a good coach dinner, of which the box, the four fron...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby

By: Charles Dickens

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ... Sancho Panza; but I know that my first impressions of them were picked up at that time, and that they were somehow or other connected with a suppurat... ...If I were to attempt to sum up the thousands of letters, from all sorts of people in all sorts of latitudes and climates, which this unlucky paragraph... ...re attachment, who in her turn had taken him for the same reason. Thus two people who cannot afford to play cards for money, sometimes sit down to a q... ...ther people’ s. What is your daughter fit for, ma’am?’ ‘Kate has been well educated,’ sobbed Mrs Nickleby. ‘T ell your uncle, my dear, how far you wen... ...were conjuring up before him. ‘Or suppose some young nobleman who is being educated at the Hall, were to take a fancy to me, and get his father to app... ...ject to my youth, and to my not being a Master of Arts?’ ‘The absence of a college degree is an objection,’ replied Squeers, looking as grave as he co... ...ly as it could, under such adverse circum- stances. So the day wore on. At Eton Slocomb there was a good coach dinner, of which the box, the four fron... ... before you were born,—I have often heard them say , that the young men at college are uncommonly particular about their night- caps, and that the Oxf...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Memorials and Other Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...the eyes of those who have taken an interest in the original se- ries. But at all events, good or bad, they are now tendered to the appropriation of y... ... any, had been already tried for me vicariously amongst the Ameri- cans; a people so nearly repeating our own in style of intel- lect, and in the comp... ...rciful bloodshed”—In reading either the later religious wars of the Jewish people under the Maccabees, or the ear- lier under Joshua, every philosophi... ...als, and Other Papers helpers. Lord Carbery, who had received an elaborate Etonian education, was even more earnestly a student than his friend Lord M... ...ore earnestly a student than his friend Lord Massey, who had probably been educated at home un- der a private tutor. He read everything connected with... ..., in the persons of their children, meeting for study at the same schools, colleges, military academies, &c.; by what furious forgetfulness of the rea... ... visits dur- ing his imprisonment. But the robber represented by the skel- eton in Mr. White’s museum (whom let us call X, since his true name has per... ...ing composed of those who are “noble;” the other, of families equally well educated and accomplished, but not, in the continental sense, “noble.” The ...

...motion. Some of these new papers, I hope, will not be without their value in the eyes of those who have taken an interest in the original series. But at all events, good or bad, they are now tendered to the appropriation of your individual house, the Messrs. Ticknor & Fields, according to the amplest extent of any power to make such a transfer that I may be found to posses...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The War of the Worlds

By: H. G. Wells

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State Uni- versity nor Jim... ...t is curious to re- call some of the mental habits of those departed days. At most terrestrial men fancied there might be other men upon Mars, perhaps... ...ons of miles it was from us—more than forty millions of miles of void. Few people realise the im- mensity of vacancy in which the dust of the material... ...elow in the darkness were Ottershaw and Chertsey and all their hundreds of people, sleeping in peace. He was full of speculation that night about the ... ...had arisen at the Horse Guards. The ordinary sapper is a great deal better educated than the common soldier, and they dis- cussed the peculiar conditi... ...starting out upon the lawn, I saw the tops of the trees about the Oriental College burst into smoky red flame, and the tower of the little church be- ... ...to ruin. The pinnacle of the mosque had vanished, and the roof line of the college itself looked as if a 34 The War of the Worlds hundred-ton gun had... ...t man left alive. Hard by the top of Putney Hill I came upon another skel- eton, with the arms dislocated and removed several yards from the rest of t...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Miscellaneous Essays

By: Thomas de Quincey

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...e University is an equal opportunity university. Contents On the Knocking at the Gate, in Macbeth....................................................... ...e human mind, and the most to be distrusted; and yet the great majority of people trust to nothing else; which may do for ordinary life, but not for p... ... corresponding improve- ment. Practice and theory must advance pari passu. People begin to see that something more goes to the composition of a fine m... ... it seem so droll. One, is, the horrid panic or “funk,” (as the men of 19 Eton call it,) in which Des Cartes must have found himself upon hearing thi... ... reign which was notoriously favorable to the arts generally. She lived in College Green, with a single maid-servant, neither of them having any prete... ... seek him in chapels and consecrated oratories. This peasant girl was self-educated through her own natu- ral meditativeness. If the reader turns to t... ...wo thousand resident 3 in Oxford, and dis- persed through five-and-twenty colleges. In some of these the custom permitted the student to keep what ar...

...Excerpt: From my boyish days I had always felt a great perplexity on one point in Macbeth. It was this: the knocking at the gate, which succeeds to the murder of Duncan, produced to my feelings an effect for which I never could account. The effect was, that it reflected back upon the murder a peculiar awfulness and a depth of solemnity; yet...

...Contents On the Knocking at the Gate, in Macbeth....................................................4 On Murder, Considered as One of the Fine Arts .........................................9 LECTURE.......................................................

Read More
  • Cover Image

Our Mutual Friend

By: Charles Dickens

...per- son using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ... the strong tide met with an impedi- ment, his gaze paused for an instant. At every mooring-chain and rope, at every stationery boat or barge that spl... ...ncies. Chapter 2 THE MAN FROM SOMEWHERE MR AND MRS VENEERING were bran-new people in a bran- new house in a bran-new quarter of London. Everything abo... ... eke in silver, frosted and also thawed, a camel of all work. The Heralds’ College found out a Crusading ancestor for V e- neering who bore a camel on... ...o was inveigled by Lady Tippins (a friend of his boyhood) to come to these people’s and talk, and who won’t talk. Reflects Eugene, friend of Mortimer;... ...they wouldn’t, to the man from Somewhere. Being a boy of fourteen, cheaply educated at Brussels when his sister’ s expul- sion befell, it was some lit... ...m, and readily received the Boffins. He was quite a young man, expensively educated and wretch- edly paid, with quite a young wife and half a dozen qu... ...ul drawback which has told upon my heart, and almost equally upon my skel- eton), and I mean to live by my calling. Putting the same meaning into othe...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Note Book of an English Opium-Eater

By: Thomas de Quincey

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...om a former paper of mine, ‘On Murder considered as one of the Fine Arts;’ at the same time proving the sincerity of their praise by one hesi- tating ... ... of exertion is very lim- ited, and is soon filled by regular professional people, trained and equipped for the service. In the case of a fire which i... ...ain rob her mistress of a night’s rest. And she well knew that, with three people all 19 Thomas de Quincey anxiously awaiting her return, and by this... ...om- mercial class of readers: amongst the aristocracy all are thor- oughly educated, excepting those who go at an early age into the army; of the comm... ...three or four months be- fore the accession of George III., he was sent to Eton, at the age of eleven; and from Eton, in his eighteenth year, he was s... ... republication of Walton’s Lives] edited by the present master of T rinity College, Cam- bridge, who is held in the highest esteem wherever he is know...

Read More
  • Cover Image

A Book of Golden Deeds

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...he collection has been made. It is rather intended as a treasury for young people, where they may find minuter particulars than their abridged histori... ...tish Navy;’ the Jersey Powder Magazine from the Annual Registrer, and that at Ciudad Rodrigo, from the tra- ditions of the 52nd Regiment. There is a c... ...er and thicker from the volcano, and the liquid mud streamed down, and the people fled and struggled on, and still the sentry stood at his post, unfli... ...isdom of Sir Thomas, or conversing with the daughters, who had been highly educated, and had much of their father’s humor and sprightliness. Even Henr... ...for the ministry, even selling the oxen from the plough to provide for the college expenses. A small legacy had just fallen to the young man, from a r... ...birthday in Jersey ‘sixty years since’—in 1804, when that 4th of June that Eton boys delight in, was already 222 A Book of Golden Deeds in the forty-... ...cent fireworks, and had blocked up the passage leading out by the Military College. A woman fell down in a fainting fit, others stumbled over her, and...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Two Sides of the Shield

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...s after the example of Shakespeare, who revived Falstaff, after his death, at the behest of Queen Elizabeth. This precedent is, how- ever, a true impe... ...d the plates, really came as near to feeding the pair as was possible with people above three years old. The one was a dark, thin man, with a good dea... ...thing,—and sharks, and volcanoes, and hurricanes.’ ‘I don’t think they eat people there now.’ ‘It’s bad enough if they don’t! And you know those aunts... ... I ever heard of her, I should think she was, and cleverer and more highly educated than any of us.’ ‘Yes,’ said Hal, ‘that was the kind of pretension... ...e had been his correspondent in school 96 The Two Sides of the Shield and college days, and being a person never easily rebuffed, she had kept up mor... ... Sides of the Shield ‘The Fitzhughs said they would knock it out of him at Eton,’ returned Mysie. ‘They got very nice after the first day, and said Fl... ...ill make much difference to you.’ ‘Oh, but I do want to be thoroughly well educated. I meant to go through them all, like Gillian and Mysie, and I am ...

...rtinence to revive the personages of one story in another, even though it is after the example of Shakespeare, who revived Falstaff, after his death, at the behest of Queen Elizabeth. This precedent is, however, a true impertinence in calling on the very great to justify the very small!...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Heir of Redclyffe

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...November. There were two persons in the room—a young lady, who sat drawing at the round table, and a youth, lying on a couch near the fire, surrounded... ...ery touching one that he wrote to me on my father’s death. Those Redclyffe people certainly have great force of character.’ ‘And was it then he settle... ...The sisters were again charmed and surprised, and Guy looked gratified, as people do at the discovery of a faculty which they are particularly glad to... ... Yo n g e He used to go two or three days in the week to one Potts, a self-educated genius—a sort of superior writing-master at the Moorworth commerci... ...ite to bring his attainments to a level with those of far less clever boys educated at a public school. Mr. Lascelles told him so at first; but as the... ...no Laura and Amy to talk to.’ He had made one friend, a scholar of his own college, of the name of Wellwood. This name had been his attraction; Guy wa... ... but he was not one whit convinced of his cousin’s innocence, thinking the college authorities blind and careless, and the tradesmen combined to conce... ...n air of tri- umph, that was rather amusing, considering what a pale skel- eton face he was regarding with so much satisfaction. ‘I dare say he is loo...

Read More
  • Cover Image

An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

By: Adam Smith

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...CH ITS PRODUCE IS NATU- RALLY DISTRIBUTED AMONG THE DIFFERENT RANKS OF THE PEOPLE. .......... 10 CHAPTER I OF THE DIVISION OF LABOUR .................... ................................................ 270 CHAPTER IV OF STOCK LENT AT INTEREST .................................................................. ...irectly destroy- ing, and sometimes of abandoning their infants, their old people, 9 Adam Smith and those afflicted with lingering diseases, to peris... ...s been very often taken notice of, the trade of a pin-maker: a workman not educated to this business (which the division of labour has rendered a dist... ... wrought separately and independently, and without any of them having been educated to this peculiar business, they certainly could not each of them h... ... By the 18th of Elizabeth, it was enacted, that a third of the rent of all college leases should be reserved in corn, to be paid either in kind, or ac... ...e out the last twelve years. I have added, therefore, from the accounts of Eton college, the prices of 1598, 1599, 1600, and 1601. It is the only addi... ...ushels of the best wheat, at Windsor market, appears, from the accounts of Eton college, to have been £ 2:1:6 9/13. From which sum, neglecting the fra...

...OVEMENT IN THE PRODUCTIVE POWERS OF LABOUR, AND OF THE ORDER ACCORDING TO WHICH ITS PRODUCE IS NATURALLY DISTRIBUTED AMONG THE DIFFERENT RANKS OF THE PEOPLE........... 10 CHAPTER I OF THE DIVISION OF LABOUR ......................................................................... 10 CHAPTER II OF THE PRINCIPLE WHICH GIVES OCCASION TO THE DIVISION OF LABOUR ...................

Read More
  • Cover Image

Framley Parsonage

By: Anthony Trollope

...per- son using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...pe CHAPTER I ‘OMNES OMNIA BONA DICERE’ When young Mark Robarts was leaving college, his father might well declare that all men began to say all good t... ... blessed with an excellent disposition. This father was a physician living at Exeter. He was a gentleman possessed of no private means, but enjoying a... ... assistance. And Lord Lufton was there of course; and 8 Framley Parsonage people protested that he would surely fall in love with one of the four bea... ... You know I don’t mean it. But Lady Lufton does not like those Chaldicotes people. You know Lord Lufton was with you the last time you were there; and... ...ent income—give them hardly any income at all. Is it not a scandal that an educated gentleman with a family should be made to work half his life, and ... ...ing a lecture on the gram- marians of the Latin language as exemplified at Eton School. ‘On the present occasion, ’ Mr Smith continued, ‘our object is... ...e world had given him credit for possessing. Who ever does? Dr Robarts had educated a large family, had always lived with every comfort, and had never... ...s still a boy, consulting with my mother about Mark and myself—whether the Eton flog- gings were not more efficacious than those of Harrow. He was ver...

...Excerpt: When young Mark Robarts was leaving college, his father might well declare that all men began to say all good things to him, and to extol his fortune in that he had a son blessed with an excellent disposition. This father was a physician living at Exeter. He wa...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Last Chronicle of Barset

By: Anthony Trollope

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... .... W alker and Winthrop was the name of the firm, and they were respectable people, who did all the solicitors’ business that had to be done in that pa... ...think.’ ‘I deny it utterly,’ said John Walker. ‘I’ll undertake to say that at this moment there are more clergymen in debt in Barsetshire than there a... ...se he’s a clergyman. I hate all that kind of clap-trap. There are a lot of people here in Silverbridge who think the matter shouldn’t be followed up, ... ...l, from whence it was intended that he should proceed to Cambridge, and be educated there at the expense of his godfather Dean Arabin. In this also th... ...t preferred that the boy should work in the fields, than that he should be educated in a manner so manifestly eleemosynary. And then his clothes! How ... ...indows of the house of his friend the dean, and told himself how, in their college days, he and the dean had been quite equal—quite equal, except by t... ...that the dean and Mr Crawley had lived together on the closest intimacy at college, and that the friendship had been maintained through life;—though, ... ...son, as a great treasure.—’Three Alderney cows, two cow-calves, a low pha- eton, a gig, two ricks of hay.’ In this fashion were proclaimed in odious d...

...ry Walker the pretty daughter of Mr. George Walker, attorney of Silverbridge. Walker and Winthrop was the name of the firm, and they were respectable people, who did all the solicitors? business that had to be done in that part of Barsetshire on behalf of the Crown, were employed on the local business of the Duke of Omnium, who is great in those parts, and altogether held ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Life of Johnson

By: James Boswell

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...ted, with an introduction by Charles Grosvenor Osgood Professor of English at Princeton University Preface IN MAKING THIS abridgement of Boswell’s Lif... ..., such as ‘love’ and ‘hate,’ and vast is the number, range, and variety of people who at one time or another had been in some degree personally relate... ...godchild Jane Langton. ‘Sir,’ said he, ‘I love the acquain- tance of young people, . . . young men have more virtue than old men; they have more gen- ... ...table in his time. The late Dr. Taylor, Prebendary of Westminster, who was educated under him, told me, that ‘he was an excellent master, and that his... ...r tutors; so that when I came to Oxford, Dr. Adams, now master of Pembroke College, told me I was the best qualified for the University that he had ev... ...tions. He took a pleasure in boasting of the many eminent men who had been educated at Pembroke. In this list are found the names of Mr. Hawkins the P... ... him not draw an outline wider than he can fill up. I have seen many skel- etons of shew and magnificence which excite at once ridicule and pity. Dr. ... ...gether at an alehouse near Pembroke gate? At that time, you told me of the Eton boy, who, when verses on our Saviour’s turning water into wine were pr...

Read More
  • Cover Image

North America Volume One

By: Anthony Trollope

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...e country described in a more or less ridiculous point of view. It is hard at least to do so in such a book as I must write. A de Tocqueville may do i... ...e those against whom a writer does not intend to give a favorable verdict; people and places whom he desires to describe, on the peril of his own judg... ...whom he desires to describe, on the peril of his own judgment, as bad, ill educated, ugly, and odious. In such cases his course is straightforward eno... ...general feelings of England to have been be- fore I found myself among the people by whom it was being waged. It is very difficult for the people of a... ...en. Taken generally, they are better instructed, though perhaps not better educated. They are seldom troubled with mauvaise honte; I do not say it in ... ...have not been departed from in many of the windows. Be this as it may, the college is a manly, noble structure, free from false decoration, and infini... ...ly creditable to those who projected it. I was informed by the head of the college that it has been open only two years; and here also I fancy that th... ...ich they have been paraded before us. They have been regarded as the skel- etons of philanthropical systems, to which blood and flesh and muscle, and ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Magician a Novel

By: Somerset Maugham

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State Uni versity nor Jim... ...BIOGRAP OBIOGRAP OBIOGRAPHY HY HY HY HY IN 1897, after spending five years at St Thomas’s Hospital I passed the examinations which enabled me to pract... ... Kelly. He had had an upbringing unusual for a painter, for he had been to Eton and to Cambridge. He was highly talented, abun dantly loquacious, and... ... a preface, so that I need not here say more about it. As a rule, the same people came in every night, but now and then oth ers came, perhaps only on... ...s of a book, I have finished with it for good and all. I am impatient when people insist on talking to me about it; I am glad if they like it, but do ... ...ike the immortal Cagliostro, he was born of unknown but noble parents, and educated secretly in Eastern palaces.’ ‘In my origin I am more to be compar... ...ed sheikhs who imparted to you secret knowledge?’ cried Dr Porhoët. ‘I was educated at Eton, and I left Oxford in 1896.’ ‘Would you mind telling me at... ...ho imparted to you secret knowledge?’ cried Dr Porhoët. ‘I was educated at Eton, and I left Oxford in 1896.’ ‘Would you mind telling me at what colleg... ...ed at Eton, and I left Oxford in 1896.’ ‘Would you mind telling me at what college you were?’ said Arthur. ‘I was at the House.’ ‘Then you must have b...

...Excerpt: A Fragment of Autobiography. IN 1897, after spending five years at St Thomas?s Hospital I passed the examinations which enabled me to practise medicine. While still a medical student I had published a novel called Liza of Lambeth which caused a mild sensation, and on the strength of that ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Little Dorrit

By: Charles Dickens

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ... publication, it is not unreasonable to ask that the weaving may be looked at in its completed state, and with the pattern finished. If I might offer ... ...ilight of pillars and arches— dreamily dotted with winking lamps, dreamily peopled with ugly old shadows piously dozing, spitting, and begging—was to ... ...o a fiery river, and swim for life to the nearest strip of shade. So, with people lounging and lying wherever shade was, with but little hum of tongue... ...footing of every new collegian to nurse the child who had been born in the college. ‘By rights,’ remarked the turnkey when she was first shown to him,... ...he ten- dered a matrimonial proposal that she was ‘a doosed fine gal— well educated too—with no biggodd nonsense about her.’ A son-in-law with these l... ...ate loose. But being in company with the brother of a doosed fine gal—well educated too— with no biggodd nonsense about her—at the period alluded to—’... ...a poor brown scrubby moss, freezing in the chinks of rock. Blackened skel- eton arms of wood by the wayside pointed upward to the convent as if the gh... ...ear-tree formerly growing in a garden near the back of his dame’s house at Eton, upon which pear-tree the only joke of his life perennially bloomed. I...

...tinuous attention than anyone else can have given them during its desultory publication, it is not unreasonable to ask that the weaving may be looked at in its completed state, and with the pattern finished....

Read More
  • Cover Image

Narrative and Miscellaneous Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...d his power to protect, even for a moment, the crown of flow- ers—flowers, at the best, how frail and few! —which some- times settles upon his haughty... ...ntions; and with our feelings of jealousy, feel- ings in which we had been educated, towards everything that tended to superstition, we soon agreed to... ...great masters of literature, especially those of modern times; so that few people knew the high classics more familiarly: and as to the passage in que... ... necessities of public business coming back in a torrent upon the official people after this momentary interruption, forbade them to indulge any furth... ... should she accomplish this? It was dark; and she stood, as you may see an Etonian do at times, rocking her little boat from side to side, until it ha... ...trength, that some railway potentate, having taken a fancy for the ancient college of Glasgow, as a bauble to hang about his wife’s neck, (no accounti... ... by three (if not four) of the reverend gentlemen at that time attached to Eton College. Mathias, no very great scholar himself in this particular fie... ...he delicacies of classic Latinity. And it is remark- able that Wordsworth, educated most negligently at Hawkshead school, subsequently by reading the ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Voyage of the Beagle

By: Charles Darwin

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...he surgeon of the Beagle, for his very kind attention to me when I was ill at Valparaiso. 4 The V oyage of the Beagle Beagle includes an account of t... ...ar water. It happened to be a grand feast-day, and the village was full of people. On our return we overtook a party of about twenty young black girls... ...st falls in such quantities as to dirty every- thing on board, and to hurt people’s eyes; vessels even have run on shore owing to the obscurity of the... ...led snipe. To this genus, or rather to the family of the Waders, its skel- eton shows that it is really related. The Tinochorus is closely related to ... ...indness of my friend Captain Sulivan, R. N., which is now deposited in the College of Sur- geons.* Don F. Muniz, of Luxan, has kindly collected for me... ...n check to more frequent robber- ies. The character of the higher and more educated classes who reside in the towns, partakes, but per- haps in a less... ...ed fragments many tons in weight, to *“Nous n’avons pas ete moins saisis d’etonnement a la vue de l’innombrable quantite de pierres de touts gran- deu...

Read More
  • Cover Image

What Is Man and Other Essays of Mark Twain

By: Mark Twain

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ..................................................................... ... 125 AT THE SHRINE OF ST. WAGNER .................................................. ...the Bessemer furnace and refines it into steel of the first quality. It is educated, now —its training is complete. And it has reached its limit. By n... ...s complete. And it has reached its limit. By no possible process can it be educated into gold. Will you set that down? Y.M. Yes. “Everything has its l... ...g. He correctly observed, and he marvelously painted. He exactly portrayed people whom God had cre ated; but he created none himself. Let us spare h... ...orm it. Mark T wain 19 O.M. But there is here and there a man who would. People, for instance, like the man who lost his life trying to save the chi... ...hine Note.—When Mrs. W. asks how can a millionaire give a single dollar to colleges and museums while one human being is destitute of bread, she has a... ...like the one blind man where all others see; the one groping savage in the college of the learned, and always, during service, I feel like a heretic i... ...l time! It is the very way Professor Osborn and I built the colossal skel eton brontosaur that stands fifty seven feet long and six teen feet high i...

............ 118 SWITZERLAND, THE CRADLE OF LIBERTY ................................................................................................ 125 AT THE SHRINE OF ST. WAGNER ..................................................................................................................... 135 WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS .........................................................

Read More
  • Cover Image

Catherine : A Story

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ... for thy stone. A heifer? Ah, many a darker sacrifice. Other blood is shed at thy altars, Remorseless One, and the Poet Priest who ministers at thy Sh... ...n these, our times, the Artisan hath his voice as well as the Monarch. The people To-Day is King, and we 5 Burlesques chronicle his woes, as They of ... ..., not inglo- riously, in many wars, against mighty odds; but ’twas a small people, and on one dark night the Lion of Judah went down before Vespasian’... ... which we have mentioned. The dinner over, the young men rushed from their colleges, flushed, full-fed, and eager for battle. If the Gown was angry, t... ...’s hospital to the Blenheim turnpike, all Cam- bridge was in an uproar—the college gates closed—the shops barricaded—the shop-boys away in support of ... ...ed that Frederick wanted for nothink. Nor did he. He was a moral and well- educated young man, who took care of his close; pollisht his hone tea-party... ... in with the twenty-three dresses on, and turns out to be the living skel- eton! There’s the clowns, the sawdust, the white horse that dances a hornpi...

Read More
       
1
|
2
|
3
|
4
Records: 41 - 60 of 71 - Pages: 
 
 





Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.