World Library  
  


Search Results (83 titles)

Searched over 21.6 Million titles in 0.37 seconds

 
Djvu Editions Classic Literature (X)

       
1
|
2
|
3
|
4
|
5
Records: 61 - 80 of 83 - Pages: 
  • Cover Image

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

By: Conan Doyle

Excerpt: A Scandal in Bohemia; TO SHERLOCK HOLMES she is always the woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. In his eyes she eclipses and predominates the whole of her sex. It was not that he felt any emotion akin to love for Irene Adler. All emotions, and that one particularly, were abhorrent to his cold, precise but admirably balanced mind. He was, I take it, the most perfect reasoning and observing machine that the world has seen, but as a lover he would have placed himself in a false position. He never spoke of the softer passions, save with a gibe and a sneer. They were admirable things for the observer--excellent for drawing the veil from men?s motives and actions. But for the trained reasoner to admit such intrusions into his own delicate and finely adjusted temperament was to introduce a distracting factor which might throw a doubt upon all his mental results. Grit in a sensitive instrument, or a crack in one of his own high-power lenses, would not be more disturbing than a strong emotion in a nature such as his. And yet there was but one woman to him, and that woman was the late Irene Adler, of dubio...

Table of Contents: A Scandal in Bohemia, 1 -- I, 1 -- II, 9 -- III, 18 -- The Red-headed League, 21 -- A Case of Identity, 41 -- The Boscombe Valley Mystery, 56 -- The Five Orange Pips, 77 -- The Man with the Twisted Lip, 93 -- The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle, 113 -- The Adventure of the Speckled Band, 131 -- The Adventure of the Engineer?s Thumb, 152 -- The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor, 170 -- The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet, 189 -- The Adventure of the Copper Beeches, 210...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Sartor Resartus the Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdr Ockh

By: Thomas Carlyle

Excerpt: CHAPTER I; PRELIMINARY -- CONSIDERING our present advanced state of culture, and how the Torch of Science has now been brandished and borne about, with more or less effect, for five thousand years and upwards; how, in these times especially, not only the Torch still burns, and perhaps more fiercely than ever, but innumerable Rushlights, and Sulphur-matches, kindled thereat, are also glancing in every direction, so that not the smallest cranny or dog-hole in Nature or Art can remain unilluminated,--it might strike the reflective mind with some surprise that hitherto little or nothing of a fundamental character, whether in the way of Philosophy or History, has been written on the subject of Clothes. Our Theory of Gravitation is as good as perfect: Lagrange, it is well known, has proved that the Planetary System, on this scheme, will endure forever; Laplace, still more cunningly, even guesses that it could not have been made on any other scheme. Whereby, at least, our nautical Logbooks can be better kept; and watertransport of all kinds has grown more commodious. Of Geology and Geognosy we know enough: what with the labors of ...

Table of Contents: BOOK I 3 -- CHAPTER I ?PRELIMINARY, 3 -- CHAPTER II ?EDITORIAL DIFFICULTIES, 7 -- CHAPTER III ?REMINISCENCES, 11 -- CHAPTER IV? CHARACTERISTICS, 19 -- CHAPTER V? THE WORLD IN CLOTHES, 24 -- CHAPTER VI? APRONS, 29 -- CHAPTER VII? MISCELLANEOUS-HISTORICAL, 31 -- CHAPTER VIII? THE WORLD OUT OF CLOTHES, 34 -- CHAPTER IX? ADAMITISM, 39 -- CHAPTER X? PURE REASON, 43 -- CHAPTER XI? PROSPECTIVE, 47 -- BOOK II 55 -- CHAPTER I ?GENESIS, 55 -- CHAPTER II ?IDYLLIC, 61 -- CHAPTER III ?PEDAGOGY, 68 -- CHAPTER IV? GETTING UNDER WAY, 79 -- CHAPTER V? ROMANCE, 88 -- CHAPTER VI? SORROWS OF TEUFELSDRO? CKH, 97 -- CHAPTER VII? THE EVERLASTING NO, 104 -- CHAPTER VIII? CENTRE OF INDIFFERENCE, 110 -- CHAPTER IX? THE EVERLASTING YEA, 118 -- CHAPTER X? PAUSE, 126 -- BOOK III 133 -- CHAPTER I ?INCIDENT IN MODERN HISTORY, 133 -- CHAPTER II ?CHURCH-CLOTHES, 137...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Golden Bowl

By: Henry James

Excerpt: PREFACE; Among many matters thrown into relief by a refreshed acquaintance with ?The Golden Bowl? what perhaps most stands out for me is the still marked inveteracy of a certain indirect and oblique view of my presented action; unless indeed I make up my mind to call this mode of treatment, on the contrary, any superficial appearance notwithstanding, the very straightest and closest possible. I have already betrayed, as an accepted habit, and even to extravagance commented on, my preference for dealing with my subject matter, for ?seeing my story,? through the opportunity and the sensibility of some more or less detached, some not strictly involved, though thoroughly interested and intelligent, witness or reporter, some person who contributes to the case mainly a certain amount of criticism and interpretation of it. Again and again, on review, the shorter things in especial that I have gathered into this Series have ranged themselves not as my own impersonal account of the affair in hand, but as my account of somebody?s impression of it--the terms of this person?s access to it and estimate of it contributing thus by some fi...

Table of Contents: PREFACE, iii -- Volume I 3 -- Book I 3 -- Chapter 1, 3 -- Chapter 2, 15 -- Chapter 3, 25 -- Chapter 4, 35 -- Chapter 5, 50 -- Chapter 6, 58 -- Book II 69 -- Chapter 1, 69 -- Chapter 2, 79 -- Chapter 3, 85 -- Chapter 4, 92 -- Chapter 5, 105 -- Chapter 6, 115 -- Chapter 7, 124 -- Book III 133 -- Chapter 1, 133 -- Chapter 2, 144 -- Chapter 3, 149 -- Chapter 4, 156 -- Chapter 5, 162 -- Chapter 6, 169...

Read More
  • Cover Image

White Fang

By: Jack London

Excerpt: Part I, The Wild; The Trail of the Meat -- DARK spruce forest frowned on either side the frozen waterway. The trees had been stripped by a recent wind of their white covering of frost, and they seemed to lean toward each other, black and ominous, in the fading light. A vast silence reigned over the land. The land itself was a desolation, lifeless, without movement, so lone and cold that the spirit of it was not even that of sadness. There was a hint in it of laughter, but of a laughter more terrible than any sadness --a laughter that was mirthless as the smile of the Sphinx, a laughter cold as the frost and partaking of the grimness of infallibility. It was the masterful and incommunicable wisdom of eternity laughing at the futility of life and the effort of life. It was the Wild, the savage, frozen-hearted Northland Wild. But there was life, abroad in the land and defiant. Down the frozen waterway toiled a string of wolfish dogs. Their bristly fur was rimed with frost. Their breath froze in the air as it left their mouths, spouting forth in spumes of vapor that settled upon the hair of their bodies and formed into crystals...

Table of Contents: Part I: TheWild 1 -- I: The Trail of the Meat, 1 -- II: The She-Wolf, 8 -- III: The Hunger Cry, 16 -- Part II: Born of the Wild 24 -- I: The Battle of the Fangs, 24 -- II: The Lair, 32 -- III: The Gray Cub, 38 -- IV: The Wall of the World, 42 -- V: The Law of Meat, 50 -- Part III: The Gods of the Wild 55 -- I: The Makers of Fire, 55 -- II: The Bondage, 64 -- III: The Outcast, 70 -- IV: The Trail of the Gods, 74 -- V: The Covenant, 78 -- VI: The Famine, 85 -- Part IV: The Superior Gods 92 -- I: The Enemy of His Kind, 92 -- II: The Mad God, 100 -- III: The Reign of Hate, 107 -- IV: The Clinging Death, 111 -- V: The Indomitable, 120 -- VI: The Love-Master, 125...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions

By: John Donne

Excerpt: VARIABLE, and therfore miserable condition of Man; this minute I was well, and am ill, this minute. I am surpriz?d with a sodaine change, and alteration to worse, and can impute it to no cause, nor call it by any name. We study Health, and we deliberate upon our meats, and drink, and ayre, and exercises, and we hew, and wee polish every stone, that goes to that building; and so our Health is a long and regular work; But in a minute a Canon batters all, overthrowes all, demolishes all; a Sicknes unprevented for all our diligence, unsuspected for all our curiositie; nay, undeserved, if we consider only disorder, summons us, seizes us, possesses us, destroyes us in an instant. O miserable condition of Man, which was not imprinted by God, who as hee is immortall himselfe, had put a coale, a beame of Immortalitie into us, which we might have blowen into a flame, but blew it out, by our first sinne; wee beggard our selves by hearkning after false riches, a?nd infatuated our selves by hearkning after false knowledge. So that now, we doe not onely die, but die upon the Rack, die by the torment of sicknesse; nor that onely, but are ...

Table of Contents: I., 1 -- II., 3 -- III., 4 -- IV., 6 -- V., 8 -- VI., 10 -- VII., 11 -- VIII., 13 -- IX., 15 -- X., 17 -- XI., 19 -- XII., 21 -- XIII., 23 -- XIV., 25 -- XV., 27 -- XVI., 29 -- XVII., 31 -- XVIII., 33 -- XIX., 35 -- XX., 37 -- XXI., 39 -- XXII., 41 -- XXIII., 43...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Death's Duel

By: John Donne

Excerpt: TO THE READER [Preface; to the Ist edition () by Richard Redmer, the publisher.]; This Sermon was, by Sacred Authoritie, stiled the Authors owne funeral Sermon. Most fitly: whether wee respect the time, or the matter. It was preached not many dayes before his death; as if, having done this, there remained nothing for him to doe, but to die: And the matter is, of Death; the occasion and subject of all funerall Sermons. It hath beene observed of this Reverent Man, That his Faculty in Preaching continually encreased: and, That as hee exceeded others at first; so, at last hee exceeded himselfe. This is his last Sermon; I will not say, it is therefore his best; because, all his were excellent. Yet thus much: A dying Mans words, if they concerne our selves, doe usually make the deepest impression, as being spoken most feelingly, and with least affectation. Now, whom doth it not concerne to learn, both the danger, and benefit of death? Death is every man?s enemy, and intends hurt to all; though to many, hee be occasion of greatest goods. This enemy wee must all combate dying; whom hee living did almost conquer; having discovered t...

Table of Contents: DEATH?S DUEL, 1 -- TO THE READER, 1 -- DEATH?S DUEL, 2

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Maine Woods

By: Henry David Thoreau

Excerpt: ON THE 31st of August, 1846, I left Concord in Massachusetts for Bangor and the backwoods of Maine, by way of the railroad and steamboat, intending to accompany a relative of mine engaged in the lumber-trade in Bangor, as far as a dam on the west branch of the Penobscot, in which property he was interested. From this place, which is about one hundred miles by the river above Bangor, thirty miles from the Houlton military road, and five miles beyond the last log-hut, I proposed to make excursions to Mount Ktaadn, the second highest mountain in New England, about thirty miles distant, and to some of the lakes of the Penobscot, either alone or with such company as I might pick up there. It is unusual to find a camp so far in the woods at that season, when lumbering operations have ceased, and I was glad to avail myself of the circumstance of a gang of men being employed there at that time in repairing the injuries caused by the great freshet in the spring. The mountain may be approached more easily and directly on horseback and on foot from the northeast side, by the Aroostook road, and the Wassataquoik River; but in that case...

Table of Contents: Ktaadn, 1 -- Chesuncook, 51 -- The Allegash and East Branch, 96 -- Appendix, 184 -- I. TREES., 184 -- II. FLOWERS AND SHRUBS., 185 -- III. LIST OF PLANTS., 188 -- IV. LIST OF BIRDS, 196 -- V. QUADRUPEDS., 197 -- VI. OUTFIT FOR AN EXCURSION., 198 -- VII. A LIST OF INDIAN WORDS., 199...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Two Years before the Mast, And Twenty-Four Years After: A Personal Narrative of Life at Sea

By: Richard Henry Dana

Excerpt: CHAPTER I; DEPARTURE -- The fourteenth of August was the day fixed upon for the sailing of the brig Pilgrim on her voyage from Boston round Cape Horn to the western coast of North America. As she was to get under weigh early in the afternoon, I made my appearance on board at twelve o?clock, in full sea-rig, and with my chest, containing an outfit for a two or three years? voyage, which I had undertaken from a determination to cure, if possible, by an entire change of life, and by a long absence from books and study, a weakness of the eyes, which had obliged me to give up my pursuits, and which no medical aid seemed likely to cure....

Table of Contents: CHAPTER I ? DEPARTURE, 1 -- CHAPTER II ? FIRST IMPRESSIONS???SAIL HO!??, 3 -- CHAPTER III ? SHIP?S DUTIES?TROPICS, 6 -- CHAPTER IV ? A ROGUE?TROUBLE ON BOARD???LAND -- HO!???POMPERO?CAPE HORN, 9 -- CHAPTER V ? CAPE HORN?A VISIT, 13 -- CHAPTER VI ? LOSS OF A MAN?SUPERSTITION, 18 -- CHAPTER VII ? JUAN FERNANDEZ?THE PACIFIC, 21 -- CHAPTER VIII ? ??TARRING DOWN???DAILY LIFE???GOING AFT???CALIFORNIA -- ., 25 -- CHAPTER IX ? CALIFORNIA?A SOUTH-EASTER, 28 -- CHAPTER X ? A SOUTH-EASTER?PASSAGE UP THE COAST, 32 -- CHAPTER XI ? PASSAGE UP THE COAST?MONTEREY, 35 -- CHAPTER XII ? LIFE AT MONTEREY, 38 -- CHAPTER XIII ? TRADING?A BRITISH SAILOR, 40 -- CHAPTER XIV ? SANTA BARBARA?HIDE-DROGHING?HARBOR -- DUTIES?DISCONTENT?SAN PEDRO, 46 -- CHAPTER XV ? A FLOGGING?A NIGHT ON SHORE?THE STATE OF THINGS ON -- BOARD?SAN DIEGO, 52 -- CHAPTER XVI ? LIBERTY-DAY ON SHORE, 59 -- CHAPTER XVII ? SAN DIEGO?A DESERTION?SAN PEDRO AGAIN?BEATING UP -- COAST, 63 -- CHAPTER XVIII ? EASTER SUNDAY???SAIL HO!???WHALES?SAN -- JUAN?ROMANCE OF HIDE-DROGHING?SAN DIEGO AGAIN, 67 -- CHAPTER XIX ? THE SANDWICH -- ISLANDERS?HIDE-CURING?WOOD-CUTTING? RATTLE-SNA...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Poems of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

By: Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Excerpt: Easter Holidays; Hail! festal Easter that dost bring Approach of sweetly-smiling spring, When Nature?s clad in green: When feather?d songsters through the grove With beasts confess the power of love And brighten all the scene. Now youths the breaking stages load That swiftly rattling o?er the road To Greenwich haste away: While some with sounding oars divide Of smoothly-flowing Thames the tide All sing the festive lay. With mirthful dance they beat the ground, Their shouts of joy the hills resound And catch the jocund noise: Without a tear, without a sigh Their moments all in transports fly Till evening ends their joys....

Table of Contents: Easter Holidays, 1 -- Dura Navis, 2 -- Nil Pejus est Caelibe Vit‘, 4 -- Sonnet to the Autumnal Moon, 5 -- Anthem for the Children of Christ?s Hospital, 6 -- Julia, 7 -- Quae Nocent Docent, 8 -- The Nose, 9 -- To the Muse, 11 -- Destruction of the Bastile, 12 -- Life, 14 -- Progress of Vice, 15 -- Monody on the Death of Chatterton, 16 -- An Invocation, 19 -- Anna and Harland, 20 -- To the Evening Star, 21 -- Pain, 22 -- On a Lady Weeping: Imitation from the Latin of Nicolaus Archius, 23 -- Monody on a Tea-kettle, 24 -- Genevieve, 26 -- On Receiving an Account that his Only Sister?s Death was Inevitable, 27 -- On Seeing a Youth Affectionately Welcomed by a Sister, 28 -- A Mathematical Problem, 29 -- Honour, 32 -- On Imitation, 34 -- Inside the Coach, 35 -- Devonshire Roads, 36 -- Music, 37 -- Sonnet: On Quitting School for College, 38 -- Absence: A Farewell Ode on Quitting School for Jesus College, Cambridge, 39 -- Happiness, 40 -- A Wish: Written in Jesus Wood, Feb. 10, 1792, 43 -- An Ode in the Manner of Anacreon, 44 -- To Disappointment, 45 -- A Fragment Found in a Lecture-Room, 46 -- Ode, 47 -- A Lover?s Complai...

Read More
  • Cover Image

All's Well, That Ends Well

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: All?s Well, that Ends Well; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter yong Bertram Count of Rossillion, his Mother, and Helena, Lord Lafew, all in blacke. Mother. In delivering my sonne from me, I burie a second husband. Ros. And I in going Madam, weep ore my fathers death anew; but I must attend his majesties command, to whom I am now in Ward, evermore in subjection. Laf. You shall find of the King a husband Madame, you sir a father. He that so generally is at all times good, must of necessitie hold his vertue to you, whose worthinesse would stirre it up where it wanted rather then lack it where there is such abundance. Mo. What hope is there of his Maiesties amendment? Laf. He hath abandon?d his Phisitions Madam, under whose practises he hath persecuted time with hope, and finds no other advantage in the processe, but onely the loosing of hope by time. Mo. This yong Gentlewoman had a father, O that had, how sad a passage tis, whose skill was almost as great as his honestie, had it stretch?d so far, would have made nature immortall, and death should have play for lacke of worke. Would for the Kings sake hee were living, I thin...

Table of Contents: All?s Well, that Ends Well, 1 -- Actus primus. Scoena Prima., 1 -- Actus Secundus., 14 -- Actus Tertius., 31 -- Actus Quartus., 42 -- Actus Quintus., 57...

Read More
  • Cover Image

To Build a Fire : And Other Stories

By: Jack London

Excerpt: ?But I say, Kid, isn?t that going it a little too strong? Whiskey and alcohol?s bad enough; but when it comes to brandy and peppersauce and?--?Dump it in. Who?s making this punch, anyway?? And Malemute Kid smiled benignantly through the clouds of steam. ?By the time you?ve been in this country as long as I have, my son, and lived on rabbit tracks and salmon-belly, you?ll learn that Christmas comes only once per annum. And a Christmas without punch is sinking a hole to bedrock with nary a pay-streak.? ......

Table of Contents: To the Man on Trail, 1 -- The White Silence, 12 -- In a Far Country, 24 -- The Wisdom of the Trail, 44 -- An Odyssey of the North, 53 -- The Law of Life, 90 -- The God of His Fathers, 99 -- The League of the Old Men, 117 -- B?atard, 136 -- All Gold Canyon, 153 -- Love of Life, 177 -- The Wit of Porportuk, 201 -- The Apostate, 230 -- To Build a Fire, 254 -- South of the Slot, 274 -- The Chinago, 295 -- A Piece of Steak, 313 -- Mauki, 336 -- Koolau the Leper, 354 -- The Strength of the Strong, 373 -- War, 391 -- The Mexican, 398 -- Told in the Drooling Ward, 428...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Paradise Lost

By: John Milton

Excerpt: BOOK I; Of Mans First Disobedience, and the Fruit Of that Forbidden Tree, whose mortal tast Brought Death into the World, and all our woe, With loss of EDEN, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful Seat, Sing Heav?nly Muse, that on the secret top Of OREB, or of SINAI, didst inspire That Shepherd, who first taught the chosen Seed, In the Beginning how the Heav?ns and Earth Rose out of CHAOS: Or if SION Hill Delight thee more, and SILOA?S Brook that flow?d Fast by the Oracle of God; I thence Invoke thy aid to my adventrous Song, That with no middle flight intends to soar Above th? AONIAN Mount, while it pursues Things unattempted yet in Prose or Rhime. And chiefly Thou O Spirit, that dost prefer Before all Temples th? upright heart and pure, Instruct me, for Thou know?st; Thou from the first Wast present, and with mighty wings outspread Dove-like satst brooding on the vast Abyss And mad?st it pregnant: What in me is dark Illumine, what is low raise and support; That to the highth of this great Argument I may assert th? Eternal Providence, And justifie the wayes of God to men. Say first, for Heav?n hides nothi...

Table of Contents: BOOK I., 1 -- BOOK II., 20 -- BOOK III, 45 -- BOOK IV., 62 -- BOOK V., 86 -- BOOK VI., 108 -- BOOK VII., 130 -- BOOK VIII., 160 -- BOOK IX., 188 -- BOOK X., 214...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Scarlet Letter

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

Excerpt: PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION; MUCH to the author?s surprise, and (if he may say so without additional offence) considerably to his amusement, he finds that his sketch of official life, introductory to THE SCARLET LETTER, has created an unprecedented excitement in the respectable community immediately around him. It could hardly have been more violent, indeed, had he burned down the Custom House, and quenched its last smoking ember in the blood of a certain venerable personage, against whom he is supposed to cherish a peculiar malevolence. As the public disapprobation would weigh very heavily on him, were he conscious of deserving it, the author begs leave to say, that he has carefully read over the introductory pages, with a purpose to alter or expunge whatever might be found amiss, and to make the best reparation in his power for the atrocities of which he has been adjudged guilty. But it appears to him, that the only remarkable features of the sketch are its frank and genuine good-humor, and the general accuracy with which he has conveyed his sincere impressions of the characters therein described. As to enmity, or ill f...

Table of Contents: PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION, 1 -- THE CUSTOM HOUSE INTRODUCTORY, 2 -- 1 THE PRISON DOOR, 31 -- 2 THE MARKET-PLACE, 33 -- 3 THE RECOGNITION, 40 -- 4 THE INTERVIEW, 47 -- 5 HESTER AT HER NEEDLE, 52 -- 6 PEARL, 59 -- 7 THE GOVERNOR?S HALL, 66 -- 8 THE ELF-CHILD AND THE MINISTER, 72 -- 9 THE LEECH, 79 -- 10 THE LEECH AND HIS PATIENT, 87 -- 11 THE INTERIOR OF A HEART, 95 -- 12 THE MINISTER?S VIGIL, 100 -- 13 ANOTHER VIEW OF HESTER, 108 -- 14 HESTER AND THE PHYSICIAN, 114 -- 15 HESTER AND PEARL, 119 -- 16 A FOREST WALK, 124 -- 17 THE PASTOR AND HIS PARISHIONER, 129 -- 18 A FLOOD OF SUNSHINE, 136 -- 19 THE CHILD AT THE BROOKSIDE, 141 -- 20 THE MINISTER IN A MAZE, 147 -- 21 THE NEW ENGLAND HOLIDAY, 155 -- 22 THE PROCESSION, 162 -- 23 THE REVELATION OF THE SCARLET LETTER, 170 -- 24 CONCLUSION, 177...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Collected Poems

By: William Butler Yeats

Excerpt: THE SONG OF THE HAPPY SHEPHERD; THE woods of Arcady are dead, And over is their antique joy; Of old the world on dreaming fed; Grey Truth is now her painted toy; Yet still she turns her restless head: But O, sick children of the world, Of all the many changing things In dreary dancing past us whirled, To the cracked tune that Chronos sings, Words alone are certain good. Where are now the warring kings, Word be-mockers?--By the Rood, Where are now the watring kings? An idle word is now their glory, By the stammering schoolboy said, Reading some entangled story: The kings of the old time are dead; The wandering earth herself may be Only a sudden flaming word, In clanging space a moment heard, Troubling the endless reverie. Then nowise worship dusty deeds, Nor seek, for this is also sooth, To hunger fiercely after truth, Lest all thy toiling only breeds New dreams, new dreams; there is no truth Saving in thine own heart. Seek, then, No learning from the starry men, Who follow with the optic glass The whirling ways of stars that pass--Seek, then, for this is also sooth, No word of theirs--the cold star-bane Has cloven and rent ...

Table of Contents: LYRICAL 3 -- CROSSWAYS 5 -- THE SONG OF THE HAPPY SHEPHERD, 5 -- THE SAD SHEPHERD, 6 -- THE CLOAK, THE BOAT, AND THE SHOES, 7 -- ANASHUYA AND VIJAYA, 8 -- THE INDIAN UPON GOD, 11 -- THE INDIAN TO HIS LOVE, 11 -- THE FALLING OF THE LEAVES, 12 -- EPHEMERA, 13 -- THE MADNESS OF KING GOLL, 13 -- THE STOLEN CHILD, 16 -- TO AN ISLE IN THE WATER, 17 -- DOWN BY THE SALLEY GARDENS, 18 -- THE MEDITATION OF THE OLD FISHERMAN, 18 -- THE BALLAD OF FATHER O?HART, 19 -- THE BALLAD OF MOLL MAGEE, 20 -- THE BALLAD OF THE FOXHUNTER, 22 -- THE ROSE 26 -- TO THE ROSE UPON THE ROOD OF TIME, 26 -- FERGUS AND THE DRUID, 26 -- CUCHULAIN?S FIGHT WITH THE SEA, 28 -- THE ROSE OF THE WORLD, 31 -- THE ROSE OF PEACE, 31 -- THE ROSE OF BATTLE, 32 -- A FAERY SONG, 33 -- THE LAKE ISLE OF INNISFREE, 34...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Measure, For Measure

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Measure For Measure; Actus Primus -- Scena Prima -- Enter Duke, Escalus, Lords. Duke. Escalus. Esc. My Lord. Duk. Of Government, the properties to unfold, Would seeme in me t? affect speech & discourse, Since I am put to know, that your owne Science Exceedes (in that) the lists of all aduice My strength can give you: Then no more remaines But that, to your sufficiency, as your worth is able, And let them worke: The nature of our People, Our Cities Institutions, and the Termes For Common Justice, y?are as pregnant in As Art, and practise, hath inriched any That we remember: There is our Commission, From which, we would not have you warpe; call hither, I say, bid come before us Angelo: What figure of us thinke you, he will beare. For you must know, we have with speciall soule Elected him our absence to supply; Lent him our terror, drest him with our love, And given his Deputation all the Organs Of our owne powre: What thinke you of it? Esc. If any in Vienna be of worth To undergoe such ample grace, and honour, It is Lord Angelo. Enter Angelo. Duk. Looke where he comes. Ang. Alwayes obedient to your Graces will, I come to know...

Table of Contents: Measvre, For Measure, 1 -- Actus primus, Scena prima., 1 -- Scena Secunda., 3 -- Scena Tertia., 5 -- Scena Quarta., 7 -- Scena Quinta., 9 -- Actus Secundus. Scoena Prima., 11 -- Scena Secunda., 17 -- Scena Tertia., 22 -- Scena Quarta., 23 -- Actus Tertius. Scena Prima., 28 -- Actus Quartus. Scoena Prima., 40 -- Scena Secunda., 42 -- Scena Tertia., 47 -- Scena Quarta., 51 -- Scena Quinta., 52 -- Scena Sexta., 52 -- Actus Quintus. Scoena Prima., 53...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Walden Or, Life in the Woods

By: Henry David Thoreau

Excerpt: WHEN I wrote the following pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only. I lived there two years and two months. At present I am a sojourner in civilized life again. I should not obtrude my affairs so much on the notice of my readers if very particular inquiries had not been made by my townsmen concerning my mode of life, which some would call impertinent, though they do not appear to me at all impertinent, but, considering the circumstances, very natural and pertinent. Some have asked what I got to eat; if I did not feel lonesome; if I was not afraid; and the like. Others have been curious to learn what portion of my income I devoted to charitable purposes; and some, who have large families, how many poor children I maintained. I will therefore ask those of my readers who feel no particular interest in me to pardon me if I undertake to answer some of these questions in this book. In most books, the I, or first person, is omitted; in this...

Table of Contents: Economy, 1 -- Where I Lived, and What I Lived For, 50 -- Reading, 62 -- Sounds, 69 -- Solitude, 80 -- Visitors, 87 -- The Bean-Field, 97 -- The Village, 105 -- The Ponds, 109 -- Baker Farm, 126 -- Higher Laws, 132 -- Brute Neighbors, 140 -- House-Warming, 149 -- Former Inhabitants; and Winter Visitors, 160 -- Winter Animals, 169 -- The Pond in Winter, 176 -- Spring, 186 -- Conclusion, 199...

Read More
  • Cover Image

As You Like It

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: As you Like it; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Orlando and Adam. Orlando. As I remember Adam, it was upon this fashion bequeathed me by will, but poore a thousand Crownes, and as thou saist, charged my bro-ther on his blessing to breed mee well: and there begins my sadnesse: My brother Iaques he keepes at schoole, and report speakes goldenly of his profit: for my part, he keepes me rustically at home, or (to speak more properly) staies me heere at home unkept: for call you that keeping for a gentleman of my birth, that differs not from the stalling of an Oxe? his horses are bred better, for besides that they are faire with their feeding, they are taught their mannage, and to that end Riders deerely hir?d: but I (his brother) gaine nothing under him but growth, for the which his Animals on his dunghils are as much bound to him as I: besides this no-thing that he so plentifully gives me, the something that nature gave mee, his countenance seemes to take from me: hee lets mee feede with his Hindes, barres mee the place of a brother, and as much as in him lies, mines my gentility with my education. This is it Adam that g...

Table of Contents: As you Like it, 1 -- Actus primus. Scoena Prima., 1 -- Scoena Secunda., 4 -- Scena Tertius., 11 -- Actus Secundus. Scoena Prima., 14 -- Scena Secunda., 16 -- Scena Tertia., 16 -- Scena Quarta., 18 -- Scena Quinta., 21 -- Scena Sexta., 22 -- Scena Septima., 23 -- Actus Tertius. Scena Prima., 27 -- Scena Secunda., 28 -- Scoena Tertia., 37 -- Scoena Quarta., 39 -- Scena Quinta., 40 -- Actus Quartus. Scena Prima., 44 -- Scena Secunda., 48 -- Scoena Tertia., 49 -- Actus Quintus. Scena Prima., 53 -- Scoena Secunda., 55 -- Scoena Tertia., 57 -- Scena Quarta., 58...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Twelfe Night, Or What You Will

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: Twelfe Night, Or what you will; Actus Primus -- Scaena Prima -- Enter Orsino Duke of Illyria, Curio, and other Lords. Duke. If Musicke be the food of Love, play on, Give me excesse of it: that surfetting, The appetite may sicken, and so dye. That straine agen, it had a dying fall: O, it came ore my eare, like the sweet sound That breathes upon a banke of Violets; Stealing, and giving Odour. Enough, no more, ?Tis not so sweet now, as it was before. O spirit of Love, how quicke and fresh art thou, That notwithstanding thy capacitie, Receiveth as the Sea. Nought enters there, Of what validity, and pitch so ere, But falles into abatement, and low price Even in a minute; so full of shapes is fancie, That it alone, is high fantasticall. Cu. Will you go hunt my Lord? Du. What Curio? Cu. The Hart. Du. Why so I do, the Noblest that I have: O when mine eyes did see Olivia first, Me thought she purg?d the ayre of pestilence; That instant was I turn?d into a Hart, And my desires like fell and cruell hounds, Ere since pursue me. How now what newes from her? Enter Valentine. Val. So please my Lord, I might not be admitted, But from her h...

Table of Contents: Twelfe Night, Or what you will, 1 -- Actus Primus, Scaena Prima., 1 -- Scena Secunda., 2 -- Scaena Tertia., 3 -- Scena Quarta., 6 -- Scena Quinta., 7 -- Finis, Actus primus., 14 -- Actus Secundus, Scaena prima., 14 -- Scaena Secunda., 16 -- Scoena Tertia., 17 -- Scena Quarta., 21 -- Scena Quinta., 24 -- Finis Actus secundus, 28 -- Actus Tertius, Scaena prima., 28 -- Scoena Secunda., 32 -- Scaena Tertia., 34 -- Scoena Quarta., 35 -- Actus Quartus, Scaena prima., 44 -- Scoena Secunda., 45 -- Scaena Tertia., 48 -- Finis Actus Quartus., 49 -- Actus Quintus. Scena Prima., 49...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Middlemarch

By: George Eliot

Excerpt: Prelude; Who that cares much to know the history of man, and how the mysterious mixture behaves under the varying experiments of Time, has not dwelt, at least briefly, on the life of Saint Theresa, has not smiled with some gentleness at the thought of the little girl walking forth one morning hand-in-hand with her still smaller brother, to go and seek martyrdom in the country of the Moors? Out they toddled from rugged Avila, wide-eyed and helpless-looking as two fawns, but with human hearts, already beating to a national idea; until domestic reality met them in the shape of uncles, and turned them back from their great resolve. That child pilgrimage was a fit beginning. Theresa?s passionate, ideal nature demanded an epic life: what were many-volumed romances of chivalry and the social conquests of a brilliant girl to her? Her flame quickly burned up that light fuel; and, fed from within, soared after some illimitable satisfaction, some object which would never justify weariness, which would reconcile self-despair with the rapturous consciousness of life beyond self. She found her epos in the reform of a religious order....

Table of Contents: Book I ?Miss Brooke, 1 -- Prelude, 1 -- Chapter I., 3 -- Chapter II., 10 -- Chapter III., 16 -- Chapter IV., 25 -- Chapter V., 31 -- Chapter VI., 38 -- Chapter VII., 47 -- Chapter VIII., 51 -- Chapter IX., 55 -- Chapter X., 65 -- Chapter XI., 74 -- Chapter XII., 82 -- Book II ?Old and Young., 97 -- Chapter XIII., 97 -- Chapter XIV., 104 -- Chapter XV., 113 -- Chapter XVI., 124 -- Chapter XVII., 135 -- Chapter XVIII., 142 -- Chapter XIX., 151 -- Chapter XX., 154 -- Chapter XXI., 164 -- Chapter XXII., 170 -- Book III?Waiting For Death., 183 -- Chapter XXIII., 183 -- Chapter XXIV., 192...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Mansfield Park

By: Jane Austen

Excerpt: Chapter I; ABOUT thirty years ago, Miss Maria Ward of Huntingdon, with only seven thousand pounds, had the good luck to captivate Sir Thomas Bertram, of Mansfield Park, in the county of Northampton, and to be thereby raised to the rank of a baronet?s lady, with all the comforts and consequences of an handsome house and large income. All Huntingdon exclaimed on the greatness of the match, and her uncle, the lawyer, himself, allowed her to be at least three thousand pounds short of any equitable claim to it. She had two sisters to be benefited by her elevation; and such of their acquaintance as thought Miss Ward and Miss Frances quite as handsome as Miss Maria, did not scruple to predict their marrying with almost equal advantage. But there certainly are not so many men of large fortune in the world, as there are pretty women to deserve them. Miss Ward, at the end of half a dozen years, found herself obliged to be attached to the Rev Mr. Norris, a friend of her brother-in-law, with scarcely any private fortune, and Miss Frances fared yet worse. Miss Ward?s match, indeed, when it came to the point, was not contemptible, Sir Th...

Table of Contents: I, 1 -- I, 3 -- II, 10 -- III, 18 -- IV, 26 -- V, 33 -- VI, 39 -- VII, 47 -- VIII, 56 -- IX, 62 -- X, 72 -- XI, 79 -- XII, 85 -- XIII, 90 -- XIV, 97 -- XV, 103...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Anna Karenina

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

Excerpt: Part I, Chapter 1; HAPPY families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. Everything was in confusion in the Oblonskys? house. The wife had discovered that the husband was carrying on an intrigue with a French girl, who had been a governess in their family, and she had announced to her husband that she could not go on living in the same house with him. This position of affairs had now lasted three days, and not only the husband and wife themselves, but all the members of their family and household, were painfully conscious of it. Every person in the house felt that there was no sense in their living together, and that the stray people brought together by chance in any inn had more in common with one another than they, the members of the family and household of the Oblonskys. The wife did not leave her own room, the husband had not been at home for three days. The children ran wild all over the house; the English governess quarreled with the housekeeper, and wrote to a friend asking her to look out for a new situation for her; the man-cook had walked of the day before just at dinner-time; the kitchen-m...

Table of Contents: Part I 1 -- Chapter 1, 1 -- Chapter 2, 3 -- Chapter 3, 6 -- Chapter 4, 9 -- Chapter 5, 13 -- Chapter 6, 20 -- Chapter 7, 23 -- Chapter 8, 24 -- Chapter 9, 27 -- Chapter 10, 32 -- Chapter 11, 38 -- Chapter 12, 42 -- Chapter 13, 45 -- Chapter 14, 47 -- Chapter 15, 52 -- Chapter 16, 54 -- Chapter 17, 56 -- Chapter 18, 59 -- Chapter 19, 63 -- Chapter 20, 68 -- Chapter 21, 71 -- Chapter 22, 73 -- Chapter 23, 77 -- Chapter 24, 80 -- Chapter 25, 83 -- Chapter 26, 88...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Sense and Sensibility

By: Jane Austen

Excerpt: Chapter 1; THE family of Dashwood had been long settled in Sussex. Their estate was large, and their residence was at Norland Park, in the centre of their property, where, for many generations, they had lived in so respectable a manner, as to engage the general good opinion of their surrounding acquaintance. The late owner of this estate was a single man, who lived to a very advanced age, and who for many years of his life, had a constant companion and housekeeper in his sister. But her death, which happened ten years before his own, produced a great alteration in his home; for to supply her loss, he invited and received into his house the family of his nephew Mr. Henry Dashwood, the legal inheritor of the Norland estate, and the person to whom he intended to bequeath it. In the society of his nephew and niece, and their children, the old Gentleman?s days were comfortably spent. His attachment to them all increased. The constant attention of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dashwood to his wishes, which proceeded not merely from interest, but from goodness of heart, gave him every degree of solid comfort which his age could receive; and ...

Table of Contents: I 1 -- Chapter 1, 3 -- Chapter 2, 6 -- Chapter 3, 10 -- Chapter 4, 13 -- Chapter 5, 17 -- Chapter 6, 19 -- Chapter 7, 22 -- Chapter 8, 24 -- Chapter 9, 27 -- Chapter 10, 31 -- Chapter 11, 35 -- Chapter 12, 38 -- Chapter 13, 42 -- Chapter 14, 47 -- Chapter 15, 50 -- Chapter 16, 55 -- Chapter 17, 60 -- Chapter 18, 64 -- Chapter 19, 67 -- Chapter 20, 73 -- Chapter 21, 78 -- Chapter 22, 84 -- II 91 -- Chapter 23, 93 -- Chapter 24, 97...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There

By: Lewis Carroll

Excerpt: ONE THING was certain, that the white kitten had had nothing to do with it: --it was the black kitten?s fault entirely. For the white kitten had been having its face washed by the old cat for the last quarter of an hour (and bearing it pretty well, considering); so you see that it couldn?t have had any hand in the mischief. Through the Looking Glass The way Dinah washed her children?s faces was this: first she held the poor thing down by its ear with one paw, and then with the other paw she rubbed its face all over, the wrong way, beginning at the nose: and just now, as I said, she was hard at work on the white kitten, which was lying quite still and trying to purr --no doubt feeling that it was all meant for its good. But the black kitten had been finished with earlier in the afternoon, and so, while Alice was sitting curled up in a corner of the great arm-chair, half talking to herself and half asleep, the kitten had been having a grand game of romps with the ball of worsted Alice had been trying to wind up, and had been rolling it up and down till it had all come undone again; and there it was, spread over the hearth-rug...

Table of Contents: I. Looking-Glass House, 1 -- II. The Garden of Live Flowers, 14 -- III. Looking-Glass Insects, 23 -- IV. Tweedledum and Tweedledee, 33 -- V. Wool and Water, 47 -- VI. Humpty Dumpty, 57 -- VII. The Lion and the Unicorn, 68 -- VIII. ?It?s my own Invention?, 78 -- IX. Queen Alice, 92 -- X. Shaking, 107 -- XI. Waking, 108 -- XII. Which Dreamed it?, 110...

Read More
       
1
|
2
|
3
|
4
|
5
Records: 61 - 80 of 83 - Pages: 
 
 





Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.