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Kamehameha V : Lot Kapuaiwa

By: Rosalin Uphus Comeau

This book is one of a series written for Kamehameha Schools Intermediate Reading Program (KSIRP) students. They are designed to increase students' reading skills and their knowledge of Hawaiian history and culture by focusing on topics such as the Hawaiian monarchy. The books are written by KSIRP staff in an effort to provide young readers with culturally relevant materials in language arts and Hawaiian studies. The authors are pleased that the books have been well received by both educational and general audiences. The books are being translated from their original English into Hawaiian through the efforts of the staff of the Hawaiian Studies Institute (HSI). Both KSIRP and HSI are Community Education Division programs of Kamehameha Schools Bernice Pauahi Bishop Estate. KSIRP is operated in collaboration with the State of Hawaii Department of Education at several intermediate schools throughout the state....

Hawaii existed as a unified nation for eighty-three years, from 1810 to 1893, closing with the overthrow of Queen Liliuokalani. Two dynasties ruled, the Kamehameha dynasty and the Kalakaua dynasty. A dynasty is a series of rulers who belong to the same family. The first sovereign was Kamehameha the Great, the founder of the kingdom. The second and third sovereigns were Kamehameha's sons, Liholiho (Kamehameha II) and Kauikeaouli (Kamehameha III). They were followed by Kamehameha's grandsons, Alexander Liholiho (Kamehameha IV) and Lot Kapuaiwa (Kamehameha V)....

Preface. vii -- Acknowledgments. ix -- Introduction. 1 -- A Royal Birth. 4 -- The Chiefs' Children's School. 7 -- The Prince and the Princess. 14 -- The Trip Abroad. 18 -- Government Positions. 25 -- The Prince Becomes King. 27 -- "Last Great Chief of the Olden Type". 29 -- Changing the Constitution of 1852. 33 -- The Constitution of 1864. 38 -- Preference for Britain. 41 -- Opposed to Annexation. 45 -- The Sugar Industry. 48 -- No Reciprocity Treaty. 52 -- Other Products to Export. 55 -- Hawaiian Population Decreases. 57 -- Workers from China and Japan. 64 -- Natural Disasters. 68 -- Buildings for Honolulu. 73 -- Kamehameha V's Social Life. 79 -- Country Homes. 81 -- Kamehameha Day. 85 -- The Royal Hawaiian Band. 88 -- The King's Last Years. 93 -- "God's Will Be Done!". 97 -- Aliiolani: A Name Chant. 99 -- Impressions of Kamehameha V. 100 -- Onipaa: Immovable, Firm. 107 -- Bibliography. 109 --...

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History of the Hawaiian Kingdom Vol. 1

By: Ralph S. Kuykendall

R. S. Kuykendall spent four decades of his life writing the history of Hawaii. He came to the Islands in 1922 as executive secretary of the newly formed Historical Commission of the Territory of Hawaii. The Commission planned, among other projects, to publish a large-scale history: a general narrative of a thousand pages or more, sufficiently documented to ensure "authoritativeness. " Working to this mandate, Kuykendall brought to bear on his task everything he could muster in the way of personal and professional resources. He was well suited to the sort of pioneer labor that faced him. He had a great appetite and aptitude for spadework of an archival kind, locating, acquiring, and organizing collections of documents. His use of materials was marked by a quite outstanding scrupulosity with regard to matters of fact. Whatever industriousness and commonsensical perceptiveness could wring from often inadequate, often intransigent sources, Kuykendall set himself to extract. Though the Historical Commission itself did not survive the Great Depression, Kuykendall, continuing his researches as a faculty member of the University o...

This volume is one of the fruits of a project undertaken more than a dozen years ago by the Historical Commission of the Territory of Hawaii and carried on since 1932 by the University of Hawaii. The project called for the preparation of a comprehensive general history of Hawaii based upon a thorough study of original sources. The first phase of the undertaking was to discover the source material not already available in Honolulu and to obtain copies of as much of it as possible, particularly of documents which shed new light on the history of the islands. For this purpose, extensive research has been carried on in the national archives of the United States, Great Britain, and France, and minor investigations have been made in the archives of Belgium and Mexico and in a number of libraries and collections in the United States. Many thousand pages of transcripts have been obtained from these places, supplementing at many points and in many important respects the materials previously available in Honolulu. Independently of this project, a large quantity of new material has been added to collections in the Territory, and there has...

Preface. xi -- List of Abbreviations. xiii -- Introduction: A Glimpse of Ancient Hawaii. 1 -- Coming of the Foreigners. 12 -- Kamehameha and the Founding of the Kingdom. 29 -- 1819. 61 -- Kamehameha II. 71 -- Early Commercial Development. 82 -- New Religion and New Learning. 100 -- The Early Years of the Reign of Kamehameha III: Regency of Kaahumanu. 117 -- The Troubled Thirties. 133 -- The Birth of Constitutional Government. 153 -- Industry, Agriculture, Manufactures. 170 -- The Recognition of Hawaii's Independence. 185 -- The Paulet Episode. 206 -- Governmental Reorganization in the Midst of Difficulties. 227 -- The Land Revolution. 269 -- Commercial and Agricultural Progress, 1830-1854. 299 -- Religious and Educational Development, 1840-1854. 335 -- The Struggle for Equitable Treaties. 368 -- The Shadow of Destiny. 383 -- On the Date of the Birth of Kamehameha. 429 -- On the Regency, 1823-1833. 430 -- On the Origin of the Hawaiian Sandalwood Trade. 434 -- On the Debt Settlement of 1826. 434 -- Index. 437 --...

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The World Factbook: 1987

By: Central Intelligence Agency

There have been some significant changes in this edition. A new Geography section has replaced the former Land and Water sections. Entries in the new section include area (total and land), comparative area, land boundaries, coastline, maritime claims, boundary disputes, climate, terrain, land use, environment, and special notes. In the Government section, a new entry on dependent areas has also been added....

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Propuesta de un protocolo para la ejecución de autopsia psicológica empleando sociometría conductual: Proposal of a protocol for the implementation of psychological autopsy using sociometry behavioral

By: Jacobo Herrera Rodríguez, Dr.; Aurelio Israel Coronado Mares, Dr.

Se realiza en este documento una propuesta metodológica para la ejecución siguiendo un protocolo, de la técnica de autopsia psicológica empleando técnicas pertenecientes a la sociometría conductual. Dentro de este artículo, inicialmente se hace una revisión histórica-conceptual de la técnica de autopsia psicológica, para ubicar sus alcances, así como para delimitar su campo de aplicación y utilidades. Enseguida se exponen algunas cuestiones fundamentales de la sociometría conductual. Finalmente se describe el diseño metodológico propuesto, pretendiendo que esta propuesta sea útil para el trabajo de esclarecimiento de casos suicidas y criminales, así como un apoyo para la labor investigativa policial y la conformación de bases de datos de tipo epidemiológico. Se describe además, el proceso de piloteo que se empleó en este protocolo en particular....

It is carried out in this document a methodological proposal for the execution using a protocol of the psychological autopsy technique applying social-behavioral and social-cognitive maps. This article initially shows a historic-conceptual review of the technique of psychological autopsy in order to locate its reaches, as well as for delimit its field of application and utilities. After that the article exposes some sociometrics behavioral basics. Finally the proposed methodological design is described. The design looks to be useful for the clarification work in suicide and criminal cases and can also help the police work and the configure of epidemiological data base. The test process that was employed in this protocol is described in the text....

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History of the Hawaiian Kingdom Vol. 2

By: Ralph S. Kuykendall

This book is the second of three volumes designed to provide a general history of the modern Hawaiian Kingdom. The first volume was published some years ago under the title, The Hawaiian Kingdom, 1778-1854: Foundation and Transformation. The third volume, which explores the years 1874-1893, deals with the reigns of Kalakaua and Liliuokalani, the expansive reciprocity era and the downfall of the monarchy. The present volume covers the middle period of the kingdom's history, between the close of the reign of Kamehameha III and the accession of Kalakaua. It was an important period with distinct and well-marked characteristics. The ideas of the kings and many of the influences at work differed significantly from those of the preceding and following reigns. But it has been comparatively neglected by students of Hawaiian history; relatively little has been written about it; and the noteworthy changes and advances which occurred during these years have received less attention than they deserve. In the present volume, an attempt has been made to get a truer perspective and to give a more adequate account of the developments of the period. T...

The first attempts to establish steam navigation among the Hawaiian islands were made by men engaged in similar enterprises in California; they were part of a much larger movement. The expansion of the United States to the Pacific coast, the extraordinarily rapid settlement of California after the discovery of gold in that region, and the quick rise of San Francisco to a position of importance in the commercial and maritime world deepened American interest in the Pacific region and in the trade of eastern Asia. This led naturally to discussion of the subject of steam navigation in the Pacific. Steamships were soon placed in operation along the American coast, and tentative plans were made for steamship lines to cross the great ocean to Hawaii, to the Orient, and to the British colonies in Australia and New Zealand. Projects for the annexation of Hawaii to the United States were another result of the same expansion movement, and there appears to have been a relationship between the idea of annexation and at least one of the schemes for putting steamships into the interisland service. Immediately after the beginning of the gold rush ...

Interisland Coasting Service. 3 -- Interisland Steam Navigation. 11 -- Transoceanic Transporation. 15 -- Harbor Improvements. 19 -- Land Travel. 23 -- Mail Service. 26 -- The New King. 33 -- Administrative Organization. 36 -- General Policy. 37 -- Mission of W. L. Lee. 39 -- Failure of the Reciprocity Treaty. 45 -- Great Britain and the Reciprocity Treaty. 47 -- New Treaty with France. 47 -- Quest for Security. 54 -- Hawaii's Neutrality in Time of War. 57 -- Hawaii and Japan. 66 -- The Queen's Hospital. 69 -- Leprosy. 72 -- Immigration. 75 -- The Royal Family. 78 -- Hawaiian Reformed Catholic Church. 84 -- Other Religious Developments. 99 -- Educational Developments. 106 -- Kamehameha III and the Constitution of 1852. 115 -- Amending the Constitution of 1852. 119 -- Death of Kamehameha IV and Accession of Kamehameha V. 124 -- Constitution of 1864. 127 -- Decline of Whaling Industry. 135 -- Growth of Sugar Industry. 140 -- Other Agricultural Activity. 149 -- Hawaii's Trade Balance. 163 -- Steamship Service: Interisland. 164 -- Steamship Service: Transoceanic. 168 -- Hotel and Public Works. 172 -- Government Finances. 175 -- Bureau of...

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Hawaiian Language Imprints

By: Bernice Judd

This bibliography includes all known titles published in the Hawaiian language anywhere in the world between 1822 and the end of the century. The only items not listed are one-page broadsides, government documents, serials, sheet music, and programs for events such as concerts, royal functions, and the like. The work was begun in 1938 by Bernice Judd of the Hawaiian Mission Children's Society Library at the suggestion of Dr. Clarence Brigham, director of the American Antiquarian Society. The original plan was simply to prepare a revision of Howard Ballou's 1908 bibliography. As the work progressed, however, it became evident that a mere revision was not practical, and a completely new bibliography was begun. Holdings recorded at that time were limited to those in libraries in Hawaii. When I undertook completion of the project in 1963, I decided to include additional information on each item and to recheck the local holdings, because most collections had grown considerably since 1938. Subsequently, I was able to add information on holdings of Hawaiian-language titles in libraries all over the world. In 1971 Clare Murdoch joined me in...

The first chapter in the history of Hawaiian printing becomes primarily a resumé of the linguistic efforts of the early missionaries to the Sandwich Islands. To a researcher perhaps the most remarkable feature of the story is that the missionaries began their printing activities even before they had settled on a standard alphabet and orthography for the hitherto unwritten Hawaiian language. The members of the Sandwich Islands Mission sent from Boston by the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions had arrived at Kawaihae armed with zeal, press, and printer, on March 30, 1820, and in Honolulu the following April 19. To their collective mind it was absolutely essential to have printed material available as soon as possible to reinforce their efforts in disseminating the gospel among the widely scattered communities of the island group. Consequently, as the oral language had to be converted to writing before any printing could be done, intolerable delay would be inevitable if the men of God were to wait until their studies became definitive. So they set to work almost immediately and in only two years completed the complica...

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Avanzando hacia el reconocimiento social del criminólogo. El nacimiento de Criminología y justicia México: Moving towards criminologist social recognition the birth of Criminology and justice Mexico

By: Juan José Martínez Bolaños, Dr.; José Manuel Servera Rodríguez, Dr.

El presente artículo tiene como objetivo, el dar a conocer las bases del proyecto Criminología y Justicia México , el diario digital y académico que se puso en marcha el pasado 29 de mayo de 2013. Se expone la justificación del nacimiento de este medio de comunicación, con la argumentación de contrarrestar la crisis de la difusión de la Criminología en México, el aprovechamiento de la llegada de la Era Digital, y las nuevas herramientas para difundir el conocimiento en la Red. Sirva este trabajo para conocer la visión y la misión del Proyecto, que en síntesis, no son otra cosa que proponer un camino para avanzar hacia el reconocimiento social del criminólogo....

The present article has the objective to present the project bases Criminología y Justicia México (www.crimiyjustmexico.com), the digital and academic journal that was launched last May 29, 2013. It describes the reasons for the birth of the media, with the arguments to counter the crisis of the criminology diffusion in Mexico, taking advantadge on the arrival of the digital era and new tools to promote knowledge on the Web. This work is planned to expose the project vision and mission, that want to propose a way forward towards social recognition of the criminologist....

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The Soul Bearer

By: Jonathan Cross

A One man's quest for truth, freedom and pure spirituality in a world without.

Beside a riverbed, an old man sits lost in his thoughts; he is SEATTLE, Chief of the Suqamish Indians. He remembers his boyhood when his grandfather foretold him of his destiny, when he was told of the Web Of Life and his duties as it's protector. The Web of Life, they believe, is the symbiotic connection that exists between all living things on Earth; the sacred balance of life. Upon the next day's passing, Seattle signs the Port Eliot treaty relinquishing ownership of Suquamish ancestral lands to the United States government in favor of a small reservation to the North. He sees that a war would ultimately prove futile and wishes instead to preserve his people's lifeblood through appeasement. In a final speech, Seattle explains that man comes from the land and that all men share equally the responsibility to protect the Web of Life on Earth. 150 years later, Dr. Richard Hawk, a lowly archaeology professor, explores the forests of his ancestors. Here he discovers an intriguing artifact he believes has spiritual significance. He takes his disovery to the one person he knows who might identify it: a beautiful shamness names Ri...

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Government Records : Results of a Search for Records Concerning the 1947 Crash Near Roswell, New Mexico

By: Richard Davis

General Accounting Office Report to the Honorable Steven H. Schiff, House of Representatives - Government Records - Results of a Search for Records Concerning the 1947 Crash Near Roswell, New Mexico...

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El estado actual de la Criminología: Actual state of Crimniology

By: Chris Eskridge X, Dr.

Aunque la evolución de la delincuencia y la desviación responde a la dinámica de los acontecimientos sociales, económicos y políticos a nivel global, es posible que la criminología tenga un impacto positivo en este campo. Para lograr esta meta, será necesario desarrollar los cursos interdisciplinarios en criminología y justicia penal alrededor del mundo, adoptar programas y políticas basados en la recopilación y evaluación sistemática de evidencias, y convertirnos en criminólogos efectivos – no solamente en el ámbito científico, sino también en el mundo político. Actualmente, la criminología no es una disciplina madura y no estamos seguros sobre cómo responder al problema de la delincuencia. Carecemos de instrumentos de diagnóstico preciso, de un cuerpo de conocimientos definitivos, de una comprensión de causas y efectos, y de una serie de modalidades de tratamiento generalmente consistentes. En este sentido, los criminólogos se parecen en algo a los médicos del Siglo XVIII....

This article suggests that while crime and deviance are subject to the dynamics of global socio-economic-political events, the field of criminology can have a marked, positive impact in this realm. To achieve this end, there is a need to advance interdisciplinary criminology/criminal justice education, to embrace systematic, evidence based program and policy evaluation, and to become effective political as well as scientific criminologists. Criminology is not a mature science at this point, and we are not certain how to systematically respond to the crime problem. We lack accurate diagnostic instruments, a definitive body of knowledge, an understanding of cause and effect, and we do not possess a series of generally consistent treatment modalities. In this context, criminologists are somewhat akin to physicians of the 18th century....

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The GPS and Galileo : Friendly Foes?

By: Lt. Col. Roftiel Constantine, USAF

In GPS and Galileo: Friendly Foes?, Lt Col Roftiel Constantine, United States Air Force (USAF), analyzes the heated competition to provide service from high in the skies of medium earth orbit. The European Union (EU) is developing Galileo, its own global positioning and navigation satellite system, scheduled to be operational by 2010. The EU states that Galileo will provide greater precision to all users than is currently available from the United States’ (US) global positioning system (GPS) through improved coverage of satellite signals at higher latitudes, and, unlike GPS, Galileo will be guaranteed to be always available—even during war or political disagreement. Regarding the enormous importance of GPS to the United States and millions of users worldwide, the prospect of a second, competing, and potentially interfering global satellite navigation system could have serious military, foreign policy, and industrial implications. The US government would benefit from the heightened awareness of the risks and opportunities Colonel Constantine presents for the United States surrounding the Galileo program....

1 INTRODUCTION TO THE GPS AND GALILEO PROGRAMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 2 HISTORY OF SATELLITE NAVIGATION . . . . . 3 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3 GALILEO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 4 GEOPOLITICAL PERSPECTIVES . . . . . . . . .35 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 5 FIVE STEPS THE US GOVERNMENT SHOULD UNDERTAKE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 6 CONCLUSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 BIBLIOGRAPHY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55...

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The International Criminal Court : Why We Need It, How We Got It, Our Concern About It

By: DONALD A. MACCUISH, Ed.

It is my hope that these three essays provide the reader with a better and more comprehensive understanding of the International Criminal Court, its development, and the reasons all Americans should be concerned. For the non-American reader, I hope that these essays provide a well-articulated explanation of our concerns about the International Criminal Court....

DISCLAIMER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii DEDICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iii ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS . . . . . . . . . . . .vii PREFACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ix Essays A HISTORY OF WAR CRIMES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Maj David A. Hater Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT: A CASE OF THE UNITED STATES HAVING ITS CAKE AND EATING IT TOO? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Maj Steven D. Dubriske Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 GENERAL WATSON TO THE ICC? THE PRESIDENT MUST DECIDE SOON! . . . . . . . . 71 Dr. Donald A. MacCuish and Lt Col Tomislav Ruby Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 APPENDIX: SIGNATORIES AND RATIFICATIONS TO THE ROME STATUTE OF THE ICC . . . . . . .9...

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Na Honua Mauli Ola

By: Native Hawaiian Education Council

Language is the fiber that binds us to our cultural identity. The UH Hilo College of Hawaiian Language, Ka Haka Ula O Keelikolani was established in 1997 by the Hawaii State Legislature to “serve as a focal point for the states efforts to revitalize the Hawaiian language through teacher training, undergraduate and graduate study of Hawaiian, community outreach, research and testing, use of technology, national and international cooperation, and the development of liberal education in Hawaiian for future generations of Hawaiian speakers. ” Named in honor of Ruth Keelikolani Keanolani Kanahoahoa, the 19th century high chiefess known for her strong advocacy of Hawaiian language and culture, the College models its operation primarily through an indigenous language. Building upon the vast repository of traditional knowledge passed down through generations, the College seeks to develop an academic curriculum emphasizing language acquisition, linguistics, traditional culture and education programs which are culturally responsive to the needs of the Hawaiian medium learning environment, and support a network of community outre...

There will be a culturally enlightened Hawaiian nation, there will be a Hawaiian nation enlightened. The Native Hawaiian Education Council (NHEC) was established by Congress in 1994, and reauthorized as part of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, Public Law 107-110, Title VII, Part B, also known as the Native Hawaiian Education Act. Among other things, this act authorizes the Secretary of Education to make a direct grant to the Education Council to coordinate the educational and related services and programs available to Native Hawaiians; to assess the extent to which such services and programs meet the needs of Native Hawaiians, and collect data on the status of Native Hawaiian education; to provide direction and guidance, through the issuance of reports and recommendations, to appropriate Federal, State, and local agencies in order to focus and improve the use of resources for Native Hawaiian education, and serve, where appropriate, in an advisory capacity; and to make direct grants, if such grants enable the Education Council to carry out the duties as prescribed by the Act. The NHEC is a twenty-five member, statewide...

Preface. 11 -- Acknowledgements. 15 -- Na Honua Mauli Ola Guidelines. 17 -- Guidelines for Learners. 21 -- Guidelines for Educators. 33 -- Guidelines for Schools and Institutions. 45 -- Guidelines for Families. 55 -- Guidelines for Communities. 65 -- Na Honua Mauli Ola Action Plan. 77 -- Programs and Organizations Glossary. 79 -- Hawaiian Glossary. 81 -- English Glossary. 87 -- References. 89 --...

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Ka Hana Lawaia a Me Na Ko’A O Na Kai ‘Ewalu Vol. 2

By: Kepa Maly

Summary of detailed findings from research on the history of fishing practices and marine fisheries of the Hawaiian islands compiled from: native Hawaiian traditions, historical accounts, government communications, kama?aina testimony and ethnography...

In a traditional Hawaiian context, nature and culture are one and the same, there is no division between the two. The wealth and limitations of the land and ocean resources gave birth to, and shaped the Hawaiian world view. The ?aina (land), wai (water), kai (ocean), and lewa (sky) were the foundation of life and the source of the spiritual relationship between people and their environs. Every aspect of life, whether in the sky, on land, or of the waters was believed to have been the physical body-forms assumed by the creative forces of nature, and the greater and lesser gods and goddesses of the Hawaiian people. Respect and care for nature, in turn meant that nature would care for the people. Thus, Hawaiian culture, for the most part, evolved in a healthy relationship with the nature around it, and until the arrival of foreigners on Hawaiian shores, the health and well-being of the people was reflected in the health of nature around them. Today, whether looking to the sea and fisheries, or to the flat lands and mountains, or to the condition of the people, it is all too easy to find signs of stress and diminishing health of H...

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Taking Down Telecommunications

By: Major Gerald R. Hust, USAF

Information is one of the most, if not the most, essential elements of combat capability. Because telecommunications affects every aspect of a society, and is probably the most important medium which military information is exchanged, this thesis provides an understanding of the telecommunications system and how best to exploit it across the spectrum of conflict. I examine the system’s vulnerabilities to both lethal and nonlethal attack mechanisms. While the ability to employ nonlethal technologies are currently limited, I recommend pursuing a strong research and development program to acquire this capability. The reason is that they provide additional policy options to deal with conflict, they are cheap, and because research may not only discover unanticipated capabilities for the US, but also identify countermeasures to protect our own systems. This thesis concludes by offering guidelines to help determine whether to exploit telecommunications with either lethal or nonlethal attack strategies....

1 INTRODUCTION . . . 1 Notes . . . 3 2 TELECOMMUNICATIONS . . . . . 5 The Modern Communications System . . . . . 6 Vulnerability Analysis . . . . . . 17 Targeting . . . . 23 Quantification . . . . . 29 Conclusion . . . 32 Notes . . . 35 3 DISABLING WEAPONS . . . . . . 38 Definition . . . . . 39 History And Legal Considerations . . . . . 41 Conventional And Disabling Kill Mechanisms . . . 44 Advantages/Disadvantages . . . . . . 49 Conclusion . . . . 53 Notes . . . . 55 4 GUIDANCE FOR CAMPAIGN PLANNING . . . . . . 57 Planning Factors . . . . 57 Conclusion . . . . . 61 Notes . . . . . 62...

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The Fireman : A Sociological Profile

By: Henry Joseph Deakin

The University of Salford have told me that I own the copyright as I submitted in 1977. It is only more recently , about 2 years ago , that the University started claiming the copyright of students' submitted theses...

"The "fiddle" was not otherwise very important to the men; they stressed that they did not like to be tied down by it . They chose work in which they could be free and autonomous"...

Chapter 1 INTRODUCTION A) The historical Development of Fire Fighting B) The Development of the Modern British Fire Service C) The British Fire Service in the Early 1970's D) Fire Brigades Around the World Chapter 2 FRAMEWORK OF ANALYSIS AND METHODOLOGY A) Introduction B) Making Contact with the Fire Brigade and setting up the Interviews C) The Interviews D) After the Interviewing Chapter 3 REWARDS FROM WORK : JOB SATISFACTION AND INCOME A) Job Satisfaction B) Earnings Chapter 4 INFORMAL ORGANIZATION AND EMERGENCY ORIENTATION Chapter 5 SOCIAL STRATIFICATION AND THE COMPROMISE ORIENTATION TO WORK OF CITY FIREMEN A) Introduction B) Education C) National Data on the Fire Service D) The City Firemen E) The City Firemen :Instrumental Factors F) The City Firemen :Expressive Factors G) The Compromise Orientation Chapter 6 THE CITY FIREMEN : PATTERNS OF SOCIABILITY AND LEISURE ...

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El Derecho Victimal en México como instrumento para lograr la justicia frente al fenómeno de la victimización : The victimal law in Mexico as an instrument for achieve justice address the phenomenon of victimization, Volume 11: The victimal law in Mexico as an instrument for achieve justice address the phenomenon of victimization

By: Carlos Rodríguez Campos

El derecho sirve como medio para poder llegar a la justicia, y ello se refleja en el tema del delito en la victimización, cuando una persona es tocada en su esfera jurídica, es decir en la suma de facultades inherentes como ser humano o en aquellas facultades otorgadas por el propio sistema jurídico. Así el derecho se concibe como una creación no terminada del ser humano como consecuencia de su dinamismo e imperfección, debido también, al atraso en contraposición con la realidad social, el derecho victimal como nueva rama de las ciencias jurídicas, surge por la necesidad de crear nuevas disposiciones que regulen estas afectaciones y establezcan una base normativa mínima para que la víctima llegue a recuperar el status previo o se acerque lo más posible a ese estado previo a la afectación ocasionada por el delito, el derecho victimal como nuevo orden normativo relativo a las víctimas del delito y ofendidos por hechos delictivos, se traduce en una nueva rama del Derecho que complementa al Derecho penal, desde el aspecto de completitud jurídica, en sus dos aspectos se propone resolver este tipo de situaciones y proteger a la víctima, p...

The law serves as a means to achieve justice, and this is reflected in the theme of crime victimization, when a person is touched in legal field, ie the sum of inherent powers as human or those powers granted by the legal system itself. So the law is seen as a creation of the human being unfinished due to their dynamism and imperfection, due also to the delay as opposed to social reality, the right of victimhood as a new branch of legal science, arises from the need to create new provisions governing these effects and establish a base minimum standards so that the victim will recover the previous status or as close as possible to the state prior to the involvement caused by the offense, the victimal law as a new normative order concerning victims of crime and offended by criminal acts, resulting in a new area of law that complements the criminal law from the legal aspect of completeness, in its two aspects, intended to resolve these situations and protect the victim, to achieve longed Justice....

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Face to Face Meetings with Jesus Christ, 3 : Revealing the End of the Age, Volume Three

By: Felix Wantang

We all live in a world where virtually every spiritual struggle is practically beyond our control. While some of us will die instantly without the opportunity to consciously sense death beforehand, others on the other hand will have the opportunity to know well in advance that death is around the corner. Regardless of which group you eventually find yourself, the truth is that every life on earth will one day without notice suddenly come to an end followed by a swift judgment with no excuses whatsoever. Do you know your final destination? When the disciples asked Jesus about the End of the Age, he said to them, “No one knows about that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.” Matthew 24:36. But in this book and for the first time in human history, Jesus discloses a unique breathtaking code in the Language of Heaven that reveals the only clue to the End of the Age. God’s spiritual principle of life for humanity on earth is, “All about Him” because He wants us to make Him the priority of our lives. But on judgment day, when you appear before Jesus Christ, that will all change because God’s spirit...

As citizens of a nation, we all have unique individual identities that clearly set us apart from all other members of the society. It could be something as simple as your Social Security Number, your DNA or even your likes and preferences in life. Your physical identity is very obvious and everybody can see it as you carry yourself around because you can’t hide from the world. On the other hand, your spiritual identity can only be felt as you exhibit your inner self from the way you approach the struggles of life. Your spiritual identity describes who you are. Joseph knew himself; he knew he was the spoiled little kid who was very much loved and received everything from Daddy including an expensive coat of many colors. But when he found himself in prison in Egypt, he knew he had to redefine and change his spiritual identity. He decided to become tough, brave, and relentless. He became very hopeful and trusting God with everything....

CONTENTS My Prayer vii Prayer Request ix Acknowledgement x Introduction xii Chapter 1: The Test of Faith 1 God’s Template of Humanity 1 Why Isaac was not Sacrificed 5 Shrewd 13 Tithes and Offerings 17 Jesus and John the Baptist 23 Blind Rush 26 Exploring the Promised Land 35 The Written Laws 45 Chapter 2: From Jacob to Jesus Christ 56 Fourteen Generations 56 Drafting the Holy Bible 65 Preparing for the Cross 70 The Lives of Joseph and Jacob 82 The Price of Guilt 84 Chapter 3: Reclamation 89 God’s Garden 89 God’s Spiritual Acceptability Test (GSAT) 93 Ready for War 102 Stages of the Journey 107 Inheritance 114 The 13th Disciple 122 Chapter 4: Supernatural Transformation 128 The Punishment 128 Reinstating Peter 130 Breakfast with the Holy Trinity 139 Spiritual Identity 145 Using your Supernatural Divine Number 147 Naming a Child 150 The Importance of a Female Seed 152 Chapter 5: Supernatural Equilibrium 155 God’s Equations of the Sacrificial Lamb 155 God’s Equations of the Cross 161 The Gates of Heaven 170 Personalize the Lord’s Prayer 177 The Call of Moses, Aaron, and Joshua 177 Go...

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Bald Justice

By: Matt R. Erickson

This fiction novel introduces the manner of deception used to bypass the U.S. Constitution's express limitations on the scope of government. Since this is a rather large topic, this novel limits its scope to deal with money, showing how legal tender paper currencies were cleverly instituted in 1862 and gold was 'confiscated' in 1933. For a thorough, non-fiction look at the same topic, please see Monetary Laws, Volumes I & II; by the same author....

Mark’s greatest insights came from his great-grandfather’s monetary papers which relayed one conversation with Floyd Johnson. Floyd had brought up that the federal government seemed to be growing immensely powerful, not by amendment as was the express means provided by Article V of the Constitution for changing federal power, but merely somehow. Mark Adamson noted that the Tenth Amendment very clearly established the ‘rule’ of American government, that with ratification of the Constitution, government power became divided into federal and State jurisdictions. Mark Adamson likened this 10th Amendment principle to a pie, with the small sliver of federal authority delegated to the federal government as outlined by the Constitution, with the States retaining the remainder of the government power pie as reserved powers. Floyd stated he agreed only in principle. He stated that in practice the federal government now all but consumed the mostly insignificant State government authorities, with States being now forced to tow the federal line. Floyd therefore argued for a pie in which the small sliver went to the State governments, wher...

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The Walker Papers : Transnational Crime and the Criminal-Terrorist Nexus; Synergies and Corporate Trends, Vol. 1

By: Jennifer L. Hesterman

Colonel Hesterman's analysis of this subject is accurate and timely. She provides a fresh look at the criminal/terrorist nexus and by examining corporate trends, provides unique insights into funding aspects of both activities. This important subject matter is ripe for further policy and substantive analytical focus. Analysts and policy makers alike can certainly use her study’s conclusions and recommendations in their efforts to protect our nation against this vexing threat....

1 “A POISONOUS BREW” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 TRANSNATIONAL CRIME . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 3 THE CRIMINAL-TERRORIST NEXUS: FUNDING TERROR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 4 TERRORIST GROUPS: CORPORATE TRENDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 5 CONCLUSION: THE BATTLE AT THE CROSSROADS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59...

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