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People Educated at Eton College (X) English (X) Law (X) Penn State University's Electronic Classics (X) Literature (X)

       
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An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

By: Adam Smith

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...CH ITS PRODUCE IS NATU- RALLY DISTRIBUTED AMONG THE DIFFERENT RANKS OF THE PEOPLE. .......... 10 CHAPTER I OF THE DIVISION OF LABOUR .................... ................................................ 270 CHAPTER IV OF STOCK LENT AT INTEREST .................................................................. ...irectly destroy- ing, and sometimes of abandoning their infants, their old people, 9 Adam Smith and those afflicted with lingering diseases, to peris... ...s been very often taken notice of, the trade of a pin-maker: a workman not educated to this business (which the division of labour has rendered a dist... ... wrought separately and independently, and without any of them having been educated to this peculiar business, they certainly could not each of them h... ... By the 18th of Elizabeth, it was enacted, that a third of the rent of all college leases should be reserved in corn, to be paid either in kind, or ac... ...e out the last twelve years. I have added, therefore, from the accounts of Eton college, the prices of 1598, 1599, 1600, and 1601. It is the only addi... ...ushels of the best wheat, at Windsor market, appears, from the accounts of Eton college, to have been £ 2:1:6 9/13. From which sum, neglecting the fra...

...OVEMENT IN THE PRODUCTIVE POWERS OF LABOUR, AND OF THE ORDER ACCORDING TO WHICH ITS PRODUCE IS NATURALLY DISTRIBUTED AMONG THE DIFFERENT RANKS OF THE PEOPLE........... 10 CHAPTER I OF THE DIVISION OF LABOUR ......................................................................... 10 CHAPTER II OF THE PRINCIPLE WHICH GIVES OCCASION TO THE DIVISION OF LABOUR ...................

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Framley Parsonage

By: Anthony Trollope

...per- son using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...pe CHAPTER I ‘OMNES OMNIA BONA DICERE’ When young Mark Robarts was leaving college, his father might well declare that all men began to say all good t... ... blessed with an excellent disposition. This father was a physician living at Exeter. He was a gentleman possessed of no private means, but enjoying a... ... assistance. And Lord Lufton was there of course; and 8 Framley Parsonage people protested that he would surely fall in love with one of the four bea... ... You know I don’t mean it. But Lady Lufton does not like those Chaldicotes people. You know Lord Lufton was with you the last time you were there; and... ...ent income—give them hardly any income at all. Is it not a scandal that an educated gentleman with a family should be made to work half his life, and ... ...ing a lecture on the gram- marians of the Latin language as exemplified at Eton School. ‘On the present occasion, ’ Mr Smith continued, ‘our object is... ...e world had given him credit for possessing. Who ever does? Dr Robarts had educated a large family, had always lived with every comfort, and had never... ...s still a boy, consulting with my mother about Mark and myself—whether the Eton flog- gings were not more efficacious than those of Harrow. He was ver...

...Excerpt: When young Mark Robarts was leaving college, his father might well declare that all men began to say all good things to him, and to extol his fortune in that he had a son blessed with an excellent disposition. This father was a physician living at Exeter. He wa...

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The Last Chronicle of Barset

By: Anthony Trollope

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... .... W alker and Winthrop was the name of the firm, and they were respectable people, who did all the solicitors’ business that had to be done in that pa... ...think.’ ‘I deny it utterly,’ said John Walker. ‘I’ll undertake to say that at this moment there are more clergymen in debt in Barsetshire than there a... ...se he’s a clergyman. I hate all that kind of clap-trap. There are a lot of people here in Silverbridge who think the matter shouldn’t be followed up, ... ...l, from whence it was intended that he should proceed to Cambridge, and be educated there at the expense of his godfather Dean Arabin. In this also th... ...t preferred that the boy should work in the fields, than that he should be educated in a manner so manifestly eleemosynary. And then his clothes! How ... ...indows of the house of his friend the dean, and told himself how, in their college days, he and the dean had been quite equal—quite equal, except by t... ...that the dean and Mr Crawley had lived together on the closest intimacy at college, and that the friendship had been maintained through life;—though, ... ...son, as a great treasure.—’Three Alderney cows, two cow-calves, a low pha- eton, a gig, two ricks of hay.’ In this fashion were proclaimed in odious d...

...ry Walker the pretty daughter of Mr. George Walker, attorney of Silverbridge. Walker and Winthrop was the name of the firm, and they were respectable people, who did all the solicitors? business that had to be done in that part of Barsetshire on behalf of the Crown, were employed on the local business of the Duke of Omnium, who is great in those parts, and altogether held ...

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Life of Johnson

By: James Boswell

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...ted, with an introduction by Charles Grosvenor Osgood Professor of English at Princeton University Preface IN MAKING THIS abridgement of Boswell’s Lif... ..., such as ‘love’ and ‘hate,’ and vast is the number, range, and variety of people who at one time or another had been in some degree personally relate... ...godchild Jane Langton. ‘Sir,’ said he, ‘I love the acquain- tance of young people, . . . young men have more virtue than old men; they have more gen- ... ...table in his time. The late Dr. Taylor, Prebendary of Westminster, who was educated under him, told me, that ‘he was an excellent master, and that his... ...r tutors; so that when I came to Oxford, Dr. Adams, now master of Pembroke College, told me I was the best qualified for the University that he had ev... ...tions. He took a pleasure in boasting of the many eminent men who had been educated at Pembroke. In this list are found the names of Mr. Hawkins the P... ... him not draw an outline wider than he can fill up. I have seen many skel- etons of shew and magnificence which excite at once ridicule and pity. Dr. ... ...gether at an alehouse near Pembroke gate? At that time, you told me of the Eton boy, who, when verses on our Saviour’s turning water into wine were pr...

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North America Volume One

By: Anthony Trollope

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...e country described in a more or less ridiculous point of view. It is hard at least to do so in such a book as I must write. A de Tocqueville may do i... ...e those against whom a writer does not intend to give a favorable verdict; people and places whom he desires to describe, on the peril of his own judg... ...whom he desires to describe, on the peril of his own judgment, as bad, ill educated, ugly, and odious. In such cases his course is straightforward eno... ...general feelings of England to have been be- fore I found myself among the people by whom it was being waged. It is very difficult for the people of a... ...en. Taken generally, they are better instructed, though perhaps not better educated. They are seldom troubled with mauvaise honte; I do not say it in ... ...have not been departed from in many of the windows. Be this as it may, the college is a manly, noble structure, free from false decoration, and infini... ...ly creditable to those who projected it. I was informed by the head of the college that it has been open only two years; and here also I fancy that th... ...ich they have been paraded before us. They have been regarded as the skel- etons of philanthropical systems, to which blood and flesh and muscle, and ...

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The Magician a Novel

By: Somerset Maugham

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State Uni versity nor Jim... ...BIOGRAP OBIOGRAP OBIOGRAPHY HY HY HY HY IN 1897, after spending five years at St Thomas’s Hospital I passed the examinations which enabled me to pract... ... Kelly. He had had an upbringing unusual for a painter, for he had been to Eton and to Cambridge. He was highly talented, abun dantly loquacious, and... ... a preface, so that I need not here say more about it. As a rule, the same people came in every night, but now and then oth ers came, perhaps only on... ...s of a book, I have finished with it for good and all. I am impatient when people insist on talking to me about it; I am glad if they like it, but do ... ...ike the immortal Cagliostro, he was born of unknown but noble parents, and educated secretly in Eastern palaces.’ ‘In my origin I am more to be compar... ...ed sheikhs who imparted to you secret knowledge?’ cried Dr Porhoët. ‘I was educated at Eton, and I left Oxford in 1896.’ ‘Would you mind telling me at... ...ho imparted to you secret knowledge?’ cried Dr Porhoët. ‘I was educated at Eton, and I left Oxford in 1896.’ ‘Would you mind telling me at what colleg... ...ed at Eton, and I left Oxford in 1896.’ ‘Would you mind telling me at what college you were?’ said Arthur. ‘I was at the House.’ ‘Then you must have b...

...Excerpt: A Fragment of Autobiography. IN 1897, after spending five years at St Thomas?s Hospital I passed the examinations which enabled me to practise medicine. While still a medical student I had published a novel called Liza of Lambeth which caused a mild sensation, and on the strength of that ...

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Little Dorrit

By: Charles Dickens

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ... publication, it is not unreasonable to ask that the weaving may be looked at in its completed state, and with the pattern finished. If I might offer ... ...ilight of pillars and arches— dreamily dotted with winking lamps, dreamily peopled with ugly old shadows piously dozing, spitting, and begging—was to ... ...o a fiery river, and swim for life to the nearest strip of shade. So, with people lounging and lying wherever shade was, with but little hum of tongue... ...footing of every new collegian to nurse the child who had been born in the college. ‘By rights,’ remarked the turnkey when she was first shown to him,... ...he ten- dered a matrimonial proposal that she was ‘a doosed fine gal— well educated too—with no biggodd nonsense about her.’ A son-in-law with these l... ...ate loose. But being in company with the brother of a doosed fine gal—well educated too— with no biggodd nonsense about her—at the period alluded to—’... ...a poor brown scrubby moss, freezing in the chinks of rock. Blackened skel- eton arms of wood by the wayside pointed upward to the convent as if the gh... ...ear-tree formerly growing in a garden near the back of his dame’s house at Eton, upon which pear-tree the only joke of his life perennially bloomed. I...

...tinuous attention than anyone else can have given them during its desultory publication, it is not unreasonable to ask that the weaving may be looked at in its completed state, and with the pattern finished....

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Narrative and Miscellaneous Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...d his power to protect, even for a moment, the crown of flow- ers—flowers, at the best, how frail and few! —which some- times settles upon his haughty... ...ntions; and with our feelings of jealousy, feel- ings in which we had been educated, towards everything that tended to superstition, we soon agreed to... ...great masters of literature, especially those of modern times; so that few people knew the high classics more familiarly: and as to the passage in que... ... necessities of public business coming back in a torrent upon the official people after this momentary interruption, forbade them to indulge any furth... ... should she accomplish this? It was dark; and she stood, as you may see an Etonian do at times, rocking her little boat from side to side, until it ha... ...trength, that some railway potentate, having taken a fancy for the ancient college of Glasgow, as a bauble to hang about his wife’s neck, (no accounti... ... by three (if not four) of the reverend gentlemen at that time attached to Eton College. Mathias, no very great scholar himself in this particular fie... ...he delicacies of classic Latinity. And it is remark- able that Wordsworth, educated most negligently at Hawkshead school, subsequently by reading the ...

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The Voyage of the Beagle

By: Charles Darwin

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ...he surgeon of the Beagle, for his very kind attention to me when I was ill at Valparaiso. 4 The V oyage of the Beagle Beagle includes an account of t... ...ar water. It happened to be a grand feast-day, and the village was full of people. On our return we overtook a party of about twenty young black girls... ...st falls in such quantities as to dirty every- thing on board, and to hurt people’s eyes; vessels even have run on shore owing to the obscurity of the... ...led snipe. To this genus, or rather to the family of the Waders, its skel- eton shows that it is really related. The Tinochorus is closely related to ... ...indness of my friend Captain Sulivan, R. N., which is now deposited in the College of Sur- geons.* Don F. Muniz, of Luxan, has kindly collected for me... ...n check to more frequent robber- ies. The character of the higher and more educated classes who reside in the towns, partakes, but per- haps in a less... ...ed fragments many tons in weight, to *“Nous n’avons pas ete moins saisis d’etonnement a la vue de l’innombrable quantite de pierres de touts gran- deu...

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What Is Man and Other Essays of Mark Twain

By: Mark Twain

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ..................................................................... ... 125 AT THE SHRINE OF ST. WAGNER .................................................. ...the Bessemer furnace and refines it into steel of the first quality. It is educated, now —its training is complete. And it has reached its limit. By n... ...s complete. And it has reached its limit. By no possible process can it be educated into gold. Will you set that down? Y.M. Yes. “Everything has its l... ...g. He correctly observed, and he marvelously painted. He exactly portrayed people whom God had cre ated; but he created none himself. Let us spare h... ...orm it. Mark T wain 19 O.M. But there is here and there a man who would. People, for instance, like the man who lost his life trying to save the chi... ...hine Note.—When Mrs. W. asks how can a millionaire give a single dollar to colleges and museums while one human being is destitute of bread, she has a... ...like the one blind man where all others see; the one groping savage in the college of the learned, and always, during service, I feel like a heretic i... ...l time! It is the very way Professor Osborn and I built the colossal skel eton brontosaur that stands fifty seven feet long and six teen feet high i...

............ 118 SWITZERLAND, THE CRADLE OF LIBERTY ................................................................................................ 125 AT THE SHRINE OF ST. WAGNER ..................................................................................................................... 135 WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS .........................................................

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Catherine : A Story

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...y person using this document file, for any purpose, and in any way does so at his or her own risk. Neither the Pennsylvania State University nor Jim M... ... for thy stone. A heifer? Ah, many a darker sacrifice. Other blood is shed at thy altars, Remorseless One, and the Poet Priest who ministers at thy Sh... ...n these, our times, the Artisan hath his voice as well as the Monarch. The people To-Day is King, and we 5 Burlesques chronicle his woes, as They of ... ..., not inglo- riously, in many wars, against mighty odds; but ’twas a small people, and on one dark night the Lion of Judah went down before Vespasian’... ... which we have mentioned. The dinner over, the young men rushed from their colleges, flushed, full-fed, and eager for battle. If the Gown was angry, t... ...’s hospital to the Blenheim turnpike, all Cam- bridge was in an uproar—the college gates closed—the shops barricaded—the shop-boys away in support of ... ...ed that Frederick wanted for nothink. Nor did he. He was a moral and well- educated young man, who took care of his close; pollisht his hone tea-party... ... in with the twenty-three dresses on, and turns out to be the living skel- eton! There’s the clowns, the sawdust, the white horse that dances a hornpi...

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