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Louisiana's 4th congressional district

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Title: Louisiana's 4th congressional district  
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Louisiana's 4th congressional district

Louisiana's 4th congressional district
Louisiana's 4th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Louisiana's 4th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative John C. Fleming (RMinden)
Distribution 59.24% urban, 40.76% rural
Population (2000) 638,466
Median income $31,085
Ethnicity 63.0% White, 33.5% Black, 0.7% Asian, 2.0% Hispanic, 0.8% Native American, 0.1% other
Cook PVI R+11[1]

Louisiana's 4th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Louisiana. The district is located in the northwestern part of the state and is based in Shreveport-Bossier City. It also includes the cities of Minden, DeRidder, and Natchitoches.

The district is represented by Republican John C. Fleming.

Contents

  • History 1
  • List of representatives 2
  • Recent election results 3
    • 2002 3.1
    • 2004 3.2
    • 2006 3.3
    • 2008 3.4
    • 2010 3.5
  • Historical district boundaries 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6

History

The 4th Congressional District was created in 1843, the first new district in the state in 20 years. It was gained after the 1840 U.S. Census.

In 1993, Louisiana lost a congressional district. Based on population figures, the state legislature created a second majority-African American district. The 4th Congressional District, represented by Republican James McCrery, was reconfigured as a 63-percent African American-majority district stretching in a roughly "Z" shape from Shreveport to Baton Rouge. At the same time, McCrery's residence, along with most of Shreveport's white residents, was drawn into the 5th Congressional District.

Democrat Cleo Fields was elected for two terms as the representative of the 4th Congressional District. When the Supreme Court of the United States invalidated the boundaries of the new 4th Congressional District as unconstitutional, the Louisiana legislature redrew the District to encompass most of Northwest Louisiana, closely resembling its pre-1993 configuration. Jim McCrery was elected in 1996 to this seat.

List of representatives

Name Years Party District residence Notes
District created March 4, 1843
Pierre Evariste Jean-Baptiste Bossier Democratic March 4, 1843 - April 24, 1844 Natchitoches Died
Vacant April 24, 1844 - December 2, 1844
Isaac Edward Morse Democratic December 2, 1844 - March 3, 1851 St. Martinville
John Moore Whig March 4, 1851 - March 3, 1853 Franklin
Roland Jones Democratic March 4, 1853 - March 3, 1855 Shreveport
John M. Sandidge Democratic March 4, 1855 - March 3, 1859 Bossier City
John M. Landrum Democratic March 4, 1859 - March 3, 1861 Shreveport Did not seek re-election as Civil War loomed
Civil War and Reconstruction
Michel Vidal Republican July 18, 1868 - March 3, 1869 Opelousas Appointed U.S. consul to Tripoli, Libya
Vacant March 4, 1869 - May 23, 1870
Joseph P. Newsham Republican May 23, 1870 - March 3, 1871 St. Francisville Successfully contested election of Michael Ryan to the 41st Congress, Did not seek re-election
James McCleery Republican March 4, 1871 - November 5, 1871 Shreveport Died
Vacant November 5, 1871 - December 3, 1872
Alexander Boarman Liberal Republican December 3, 1872 - March 3, 1873 Shreveport Went on to other political involvements
Vacant March 4, 1873 - November 24, 1873
George Luke Smith Republican November 24, 1873 - March 3, 1875 Shreveport Elected in a special election to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Representative-elect Samuel Peters
William Mallory Levy Democratic March 4, 1875 - March 3, 1877 Natchitoches Failed to be renominated by the Democrats
Joseph Barton Elam Democratic March 4, 1877 - March 3, 1881 Mansfield Injured in a stagecoach accident, left Congress, returned to practice of law
Newton C. Blanchard Democratic March 4, 1881 - March 12, 1894 Shreveport Resigned, appointed to the United States Senate.
Vacant March 12, 1894 - May 12, 1894
Henry Warren Ogden Democratic May 12, 1894 - March 3, 1899 Benton Preferred farming and went back to it
Phanor Breazeale Democratic March 4, 1899 - March 3, 1905 Natchitoches Lost Democratic primary to John T. Watkins
John T. Watkins Democratic March 4, 1905 - March 3, 1921 Minden Lost Democratic primary to John N. Sandlin
John N. Sandlin Democratic March 4, 1921 - January 3, 1937 Minden Unsuccessfully sought U.S. Senate seat
Overton Brooks Democratic January 3, 1937 - September 16, 1961 Shreveport Died
Vacant September 16, 1961 - December 19, 1961
Joe Waggonner, Jr. Democratic December 19, 1961 - January 3, 1979 Plain Dealing Retired from Congress
Buddy Leach Democratic January 3, 1979 – January 3, 1981 Leesville Defeated by Buddy Roemer
Buddy Roemer Democratic[2] January 3, 1981 - March 14, 1988 Bossier City Resigned to become Governor
Vacant March 14, 1988 - April 16, 1988
Jim McCrery Republican April 16, 1988 - January 3, 1993 Shreveport Won special election to fill remainder of Roemer's term
Redistricted to 5th district
Cleo Fields Democratic January 3, 1993 - January 3, 1997 Baton Rouge Redistricted in a way adverse to Fields' continuation
Jim McCrery Republican January 3, 1997 - January 3, 2009 Shreveport Redistricted from 5th district, Retired from Congress
John C. Fleming Republican January 3, 2009–Present Minden

Recent election results

2002

Louisiana's 4th Congressional District Election (2002)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim McCrery* 114,649 71.61
Democratic John Milkovich 42,340 26.45
Libertarian Bill Jacobs 3,104 1.94
Total votes 160,093 100.00
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

2004

Louisiana's 4th Congressional District Election (2004)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim McCrery* ' 100.00
Total votes ' 100.00
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

2006

Louisiana's 4th Congressional District Election (2006)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim McCrery* 77,078 57.40
Democratic Artis R. Cash, Sr. 22,757 16.95
Democratic Patti Cox 17,788 13.25
Republican Chester T. "Catfish" Kelley 16,649 12.40
Total votes 134,272 100.00
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

2008

Louisiana's 4th Congressional District Election (December 6, 2008)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John C. Fleming 44,501 48.07
Democratic Paul J. Carmouche 44,151 47.69
Independent Chester T. "Catfish" Kelley 3,245 3.51
Independent Gerard J. Bowen 675 0.73
Total votes 92,572 100.00
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

2010

Louisiana's 4th Congressional District Election (2010)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John C. Fleming* 105,223 62.34
Democratic David Melville 54,609 32.35
Independent Artis R. Cash, Sr. 8,962 5.31
Total votes 168,794 100.00
Voter turnout %
Republican hold

Historical district boundaries

2003 - 2013

See also

References

  1. ^ "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress: 2004 & 2008" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. 2012. Retrieved 2013-01-10. 
  2. ^ Roemer switched to the Republicans in 1991 while serving as governor. See ROEMER, Charles Elson (Buddy), III - Biographical Information.
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company. 
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present

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