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List of ghost towns in the United States

 

List of ghost towns in the United States

This is an incomplete list of ghost towns in the United States.

Contents: U.S. states (links in italic lead to a new page)
Alabama - Alaska - Arizona - Arkansas - California - Colorado - Connecticut - Delaware - Florida - Georgia - Hawaii - Idaho - Illinois - Indiana - Iowa - Kansas - Kentucky - Louisiana - Maine - Maryland - Massachusetts - Michigan - Minnesota - Mississippi - Missouri - Montana - Nebraska - Nevada - New Hampshire - New Jersey - New Mexico - New York - North Carolina - North Dakota - Ohio - Oklahoma - Oregon - Pennsylvania - Rhode Island - South Carolina - South Dakota - Tennessee - Texas - Utah - Vermont - Virginia - Washington - West Virginia - Wisconsin - Wyoming

Listing by state

Alabama

Alaska

The waterfront at Dyea, Alaska during the Klondike Gold Rush
Flat, Alaska, August 1, 1911
The abandoned copper mine complex at Kennecott, Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

California

Colorado

Connecticut

An aerial view (from a kite) of Pleasure Beach, Connecticut

Delaware

A destroyed Glenville, Delaware home, two weeks after a storm destroyed the community (photo taken October 2, 2003)

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

A house in Kaimu, Hawaii in 1888. Kaimu was completely destroyed by an eruptive flow of lava from the Kūpaʻianahā vent of the Kīlauea volcano in 1990.[1]

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

the sole remaining house in Baltimore, Indiana
Abandoned grain elevators at Corwin, Indiana
An abandoned building and grain silos in Sloan, Indiana

Iowa

Donnan, Iowa memorial sign, showing the former location of the City of Donnan

Kansas

Kentucky

Main Street, Paradise, Kentucky in 1898

Louisiana

Maine

Main Street, Flagstaff, Maine, circa 1915

Maryland

Massachusetts

An example of a "Babson Boulder" at Dogtown, Massachusetts
"The end of Enfield." A photograph of downtown Enfield, Massachusetts, taken sometime after the town's disincorporation in 1938.

Michigan

Minnesota


Mississippi

Front of the former First Presbyterian Church in Rodney, Mississippi

Missouri

A street in Hamburg, Missouri, 1933

(Note: Hamburg, Howell, and Toonerville were all located in St. Charles County, Missouri. All three towns became part of the Weldon Spring Ordnance Works in 1941 for WWII, which later became part of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP)[3])

Montana

Nebraska

Rock Bluff School, formerly the Naomi Institute, Rock Bluff, Nebraska

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New Mexico

New York

North Carolina

North Dakota

A sign along the railroad tracks in Petrel, North Dakota
The abandoned Falsen School in Verendrye, North Dakota
External links
  • Ghosttowns of North Dakota
  • Ghosts of North Dakota

Ohio

West entrance of the Moonville tunnel in Moonville, Ohio
Intersection of Black Run Road and Shady Glen Road in Knockemstiff, Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

See also

References

  1. ^ Summary of the Pu`u `Ō `ō-Kupaianaha Eruption, 1983-present
  2. ^ Packard, Aaron (May 22, 2011). "The Kendall Lumber Co. of Garrett County, Md". Nova Numismatics. Retrieved October 26, 2013. 
  3. ^ DOE Weldon Spring Site History (WSSRAP)
  4. ^ Livermore
  5. ^ a b New Milwaukee Towns, Mandan [North Dakota] Pioneer 4/8/1910
  6. ^ Brisbane, ND Postal Application 1910
  7. ^ Brisbane North Dakota
  8. ^ Where was Dogtooth North Dakota?
  9. ^ Tadmor, OH
  10. ^ Sprucevale on Dead Ohio web page
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Weis, Norman D. (1971). Ghost Towns of the Northwest. Caldwell, Idaho, USA: Caxton Press. ISBN . 
  12. ^ a b Hafnor, John. Black Hills Believables: Strange-but-true Tales of the Old West. Fort Collins, Colorado: Lone Pine Productions, 2002. 54. Web. 8 Aug. 2013.

External links

  • Ghosttowns.com
  • Unlocking the Past by Madeline DeJournett and Elfreda Cox (May 2007) ghost towns in Stoddard County, Missouri.
  • Ghost towns of the American West
  • Ghost town Gallery
  • Lost America
  • Monument Gallery
  • Ghosttowns of the US at Rootsweb
  • Ghosttowns.de
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