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List of million-selling game consoles

 

List of million-selling game consoles

Sony's PlayStation 2 is the best-selling game system overall with over 155 million units worldwide.[1]

A

  • "2003年5月5日~2003年5月11日".  
  • "2003年5月12日~2003年5月18日".  
  • "2003年6月9日~2003年6月15日".  
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  • "2003年8月11日~2003年8月17日".  
  • "2003年9月15日~2003年9月21日".  
  • "2003年10月6日~2003年10月12日".  
  • "2003年10月13日~2003年10月19日".  
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  • "2003年11月17日~2003年11月23日".  
  • "2003年12月8日~2003年12月14日".  
  • "2003年12月15日~2003年12月21日".  
  • "2003年12月22日~2004年1月4日".  
  • "2004年1月5日~2004年1月11日".  
§ WonderSwan Famitsu sources
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  2. ^ a b Lee, Robin (August 23, 2012). Peitz, Martin; Waldfogel, Joel, eds. The Oxford Handbook of the Digital Economy.  
  3. ^ a b Shelly, Gary; Misty, Vermaat (February 25, 2010). Discovering Computers 2011: Living in a Digital World, Complete. Shelly Cashman. Contributing authors: Quasney, Jeffrey; Sebok, Susan; Freund, Steven.  
  4. ^ Retro Rogue. "2004 Holiday Gift Guide Review - Atari Flashback Console (Atari)".  
  5. ^ Chen, Brian (August 29, 2013). "New Device At Nintendo Is Cheaper, For Youths".  
  6. ^ Kuchera, Ben (February 28, 2011). "It’s unofficial: dedicated gaming devices may be losing out to phones".  
  7. ^ Newman, Jared (November 11, 2013). "PC Game Streaming Is Going to Be Huge".  
  8. ^ Edwards, Benj (May 15, 2007). "Videogames Turn 40 Years Old".  
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  10. ^ Loguidice, Bill; Barton, Matt (May 8, 2008). "A History of Gaming Platforms: Mattel Intellivision".  
  11. ^ Demaria, Rusel; Wilson, Johnny (December 18, 2003). High Score! The Illustrated History of Video games (2nd ed.).  
  12. ^ East, Tom (November 11, 2009). "History Of Nintendo: Game Boy".  
  13. ^ a b Patsuris, Penelope (June 7, 2004). "Sony PSP Vs. Nintendo DS".  
  14. ^ Hutsko, Joe (March 25, 2000). "88 Million and Counting; Nintendo Remains King of the Handheld Game Players".  
  15. ^ "Playstation2 sales reach 150 million units worldwide" (Press release).  
  16. ^ "Nintendo Offers Unrivaled Value and Variety This Holiday Season with Lower Wii U Price, Zelda Wii U Bundle and New Nintendo 2DS Portable" (Press release).  
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v "Consolidated Sales Transition by Region" (PDF).  
  18. ^ "Business Development - Hardware".  
  19. ^ a b "Slimmer, Lighter PlayStation 3, new PlayStation Network services, plenty of content and a great value price" (PDF) (Press release).  
  20. ^ "PlayStation 2 Worldwide Hardware Unit Sales".  
  21. ^ Stuart, Keith (January 4, 2013). "PlayStation 2 manufacture ends after 12 years".  
  22. ^ "PlayStation 3 Sales Reach 80 Million Units Worldwide" (Press release).  
  23. ^ "Sony Global Q2 FY2014".  
  24. ^ "PSP (PlayStation Portable) Worldwide Hardware Unit Sales".  
  25. ^ Campbell, Evan (June 3, 2014). "Sony Discontinuing PSP".  
  26. ^ a b Associated Press (June 3, 2014). "Sony to Stop Selling PlayStation Portable".  
  27. ^ Moriarty, Colin (November 17, 2014). "Vita Sales Are Picking Up Thanks to PS4 Remote Play".  
  28. ^ Moriarty, Colin (July 9, 2013). "PS4 + PS3 + Vita = 100 Million Sold (and Counting)".  
  29. ^ Edwards, Benj (April 21, 2009). "Happy 20th b-day, Game Boy: here are 6 reasons why you’re #1".  
  30. ^ Beuscher, Dave. "Overview: Game Boy Color".  
  31. ^ a b "PlayStation Cumulative Production Shipments of Hardware".  
  32. ^ "Earnings Release FY14 Q4".  
  33. ^ Makuch, Eddie (June 9, 2014). "E3 2014: $399 Xbox One Out Now, Xbox 360 Sales Rise to 84 million".  
  34. ^ "Earnings Release FY14 Q2".  
  35. ^ "Earnings Release FY14 Q3". Microsoft. April 24, 2014. Retrieved April 24, 2014. 
  36. ^ Retro Gamer staff (2013). "Sonic Boom: The Success Story of Sonic the Hedgehog". The Mega Drive/SNES Book ( 
  37. ^ Horowitz, Ken (February 7, 2013). "Interview: Joe Miller". Sega-16. Retrieved November 17, 2013. 
  38. ^ "Videospiel-Algebra". Man!ac Magazine (in German). May 1995. 
  39. ^ "Yearly market report".  
  40. ^ Lomas, Ed (November 1996). "News: Over 1 Million Saturns In Europe By March!".  
  41. ^ a b Buchanan, Levi (March 20, 2009). "Genesis vs. SNES: By the Numbers".  
  42. ^ Orlando, Greg (May 15, 2007). "Console Portraits: A 40-Year Pictorial History of Gaming".  
  43. ^ "Sega tops holiday, yearly sales projections; Sega Saturn installed base reaches 1.6 million in U.S., 7 million worldwide".  
  44. ^ "Sega farms out Genesis". Consumer Electronics. March 2, 1998. p. 1. Archived from the original on July 9, 2012. 
  45. ^ Strom, Stephanie (March 14, 1998). "Sega Enterprises Pulls Its Saturn Video Console From the U.S. Market".  
  46. ^ Snider, Mike (September 8, 1999). "Sega shoots to be a player again Dreamcast gets jump to regain market".  
  47. ^ "Sega pulls back from consoles".  
  48. ^ "Cartridge Console With 15 Sega Megadrive Games".  
  49. ^ "Mega Drive Guitar Idol - 87 jogos" (in Portuguese).  
  50. ^ a b "AtGames to Launch Atari Flashback 4 to Celebrate Atari's 40th Anniversary!" (Press release).  
  51. ^ a b "Gamers Catch Their Breath as Xbox 360 and Xbox Live Reinvent Next-Generation Gaming". Xbox.com. May 10, 2006. Archived from the original on July 9, 2007. Retrieved September 5, 2007. 
  52. ^ "Screen Digest".   (cf. here [1], here [2], and here [3])
  53. ^ Nihon Kōgyō Shinbunsha (1986). "Amusement". Business Japan (Nihon Kogyo Shimbun) 31 (7-12): 89. Retrieved January 24, 2012. 
  54. ^  
  55. ^ Azevedo, Théo (July 30, 2012). "Vinte anos depois, Master System e Mega Drive vendem 150 mil unidades por ano no Brasil" (in Portuguese).  
  56. ^ a b Crossley, Rob (October 31, 2014). "PS4 Sales Soar to 13.5m, Yet Sony Losses Continue".  
  57. ^ a b Castle, Matthew (December 22, 2013). "History Lesson: Game Gear".  
  58. ^ a b Bit-tech staff (September 29, 2009). "Remembering the Sega Dreamcast".  
  59. ^ a b Phillips, Tom (April 11, 2012). "SNES celebrates 20th birthday in UK".  
  60. ^ a b Lefton, Terry (March 2, 1998). "Looking for a Sonic Boom".  
  61. ^ "Retrospection: Atari 7800".  
  62. ^ "Retro chic – Atari 7800 (1987)".  
  63. ^ http://web.archive.org/web/20090221144913/http://www.segatoys.co.jp/english/company_profile/business_strategy/edutainment.html
  64. ^ http://www.segatoys.co.jp/company_information/press_release/pdf/20050405.pdf
  65. ^ http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Majesco+Signs+Licensing+Deal+to+Distribute+Sega+Pico+Educational...-a055353637
  66. ^ a b Ricciardi, John (October 1, 2002). "Hands-On With Bandai's SwanCrystal ; Move over, Game Boy Advance - there's a new bird in town".  
  67. ^ a b "Bandai to Launch WonderSwan Color in Dec.".  
  68. ^ a b c "第21回 スワンクリスタル受注生産へ! ワンダースワンのこれまでとこれからを探る! 【見習い記者の取材日記】".  
  69. ^ "Bandai to Supply Software for Nintendo's Game Boy".  
  70. ^ "Device solution". Koto. Retrieved February 12, 2014. 
  71. ^ a b Parish, Jeremy (July 13, 2013). "The Famicom Legacy".  
  72. ^ a b  
  73. ^ a b "Intellivision: Intelligent Television".  
  74. ^ a b Androvich, Mark (February 19, 2008). "N-gage's Second Coming".  
  75. ^ "Coleco Industries sales report" (Press release).  
  76. ^ a b Kleinfield, N. R. (July 21, 1985). "Coleco Moves Out Of The Cabbage Patch".  
  77. ^ Associated Press (October 19, 1985). "Coleco's Net In Sharp Rise".  
  78. ^ a b "Top 25 Video Game Consoles of All Time (Magnavox Odyssey 2)".  
  79. ^ Pereira, Joseph (November 16, 1992). "Technology (A Special Report): At Our Leisure --- (Not So) Great Expectations: Hand-held Video Games Will Get Better, But Big Improvements May Take a While".  
  80. ^  
  81. ^ Elrich, David (September 15, 1994). "Video-Game Wars: Fighting It Out Off-Screen".  
  82. ^ Townsend, Allie (November 4, 2010). "Top 10 Failed Gaming Consoles".  
  83. ^ a b Dillon, Roberto (April 12, 2011). The Golden Age of Video Games: The Birth of a Multibillion Dollar Industry.  
  84. ^ Mehegan, David (May 8, 1988). "Putting Coleco Industries Back Together".  
  85. ^ a b Schrage, Michael (May 22, 1984). "Atari Introduces Game In Attempt for Survival".  
  86. ^ Reimer, Jeremy (October 10, 2005). "The evolution of gaming: computers, consoles, and arcade".  

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h As of 2012, Sony stopped divulging individual platform sales in their fiscal reports.[19] PlayStation 2: 138.8 million units sold as of Sony's fiscal quarter ending June 2009 (Q1 FY2009).[20] Sony sold 16.2 million units from the second 2009 fiscal quarter (Q2 FY2009) until March 31, 2012.[21] It was discontinued worldwide on January 4, 2013.[22] PlayStation 3: A Sony press release reported 80 million sold as of November 2, 2013.[23] 2.3 million shipped in first 9 months of 2014.[24] PlayStation Portable: 52.9 million units sold as of Sony's fiscal quarter ending June 2009 (Q1 FY2009).[20] Sony sold 23.4 million units from the second 2009 fiscal quarter (Q2 FY2009) until March 31, 2012.[25] On June 3, 2014, IGN reported a sales figure of 80 million,[26] but the Associated Press noted "More than 76 million PSP machines were sold, as of two years ago, the last time a tally was taken."[27] Shipments to North America ended in January 2014, and to Japan in June 2014. Shipments to Europe will end during the latter part of 2014.[27] On November 17, 2014, IGN reported that 82 million PSP were manufactured and shipped at end of production.[28] PlayStation Vita: IGN guesstimate given on July 9, 2014.[29]
  2. ^ a b Nintendo only provided a combined sales total.[30] Before Game Boy Color's release in late-1998,[31] previous models sold 64.42 million units combined worldwide.[18]
  3. ^ a b c d Starting with Microsoft's fiscal quarter ending June 2014 (Q4), the company stopped divulging individual platform sales in their fiscal reports.[33] Xbox 360: Sold 84 million as of June 2014.[34] Xbox One: During Q2 and Q3 2014, 3.9 million[35] and 1.2 million were sold respectively.[36]
  4. ^ a b Sega sold approximately 40 million units worldwide.[37] Former Sega Senior Vice President of Product Development Joe Miller elaborated this figure; it includes the model 1, model 2, Sega Nomad, and others, but not those released by Majesco.[38] According to Man!ac magazine, the Sega Genesis sold 29 million units with 14 million of those in North America by the end of 1994.[39] Famitsu reported 3.58 million in Japan and 25 million for the United States and Europe by the end of March 1996.[40] Computer and Video Games '​ November 1996 issue reported 8 million sold in Europe.[41] The 29 million figure was later published by other sources, including IGN and Wired.[42][43] However, Sega continued to sell the Genesis worldwide through 1997.[44][45] Reports of the Genesis reaching 20 million units sold in the United States started as early as 1998.[46][47][48] Different console variations, including those by Tectoy, were later sold.[49][50]
  5. ^ a b 13 million according to a 2009 article by IGN's Levi Buchanan.[42] Screen Digest wrote in a 1995 publication that the Master System's active installed user base in Western Europe peaked at 6.25 million in 1993. Those countries that peaked are France at 1.6 million, Germany at 700 thousand, the Netherlands at 200 thousand, Spain at 550 thousand, the United Kingdom at 1.35 million, and other Western European countries at 1.4 million. However, Belgium peaked in 1991 with 600 thousand, and Italy in 1992 with 400 thousand. Thus it is estimated approximately 6.8 million units were purchased in this part of Europe.[53] 1 million were sold in Japan as of 1986.[54] 2 million were sold in the United States.[55] 5 million were sold by Tectoy in Brazil as of 2012.[56]
  6. ^ a b United States sales only.[62] It was released in Europe the following year.[63]
  7. ^ a b Sega sold this amount as of April 2005.[64] Its successor launched on August 6, 2005.[65] Majesco re-manufactured and distributed the Pico in the United States starting at the end of 1999.[66]
  8. ^ a b Bandai released three WonderSwan iterations.[67] A March 2003 Famitsu article reported the original (March 1999)[68] and color (December 2000)[68] versions sold approximately 3 million units combined,[69] while the SwanCrystal (July 2002)[67] sold over 200 thousand units.[69] Bandai announced the transition from hardware to third-party development in February 2003 due to declining sales and will supply software to the competitor's Game Boy Advance by March 2004.[70] Average weekly Famitsu sales during the transition were only a couple hundred units,[§] and the SwanCrystal went build to order starting in autumn 2003.[69] WonderSwan hardware designer Koto claimed over 3.5 million were sold.[71]
  9. ^ a b The ColecoVision reached 2 million units sold by the spring of 1984. Console quarterly sales dramatically decreased at this time, but it continued to sell modestly[76][77] with most inventory gone by October 1985.[78]
  10. ^ a b The Wall Street Journal reported in November 1992 approximately 1 million were sold.[80] Around June 1994, Atari shifted its focus from the Lynx to its Jaguar console.[81]
  11. ^ a b This Philips-reported figure was in The New York Times on September 15, 1994.[82] The CD-i was discontinued in 1998.[83]
  12. ^ a b Coleco launched Telstar in 1976 and sold a million. Production and delivery issues, and dedicated consoles being replaced by electronic handheld games dramatically reduced sales in 1977. Over a million Telstars were scrapped in 1978, and it cost Coleco $22.3 million that year[77]—almost bankrupting the company.[85]

Notes

Million-selling game consoles by firm
Manufacturer Home
console sales
Handheld
console sales
Total sales
Nintendo 277.2 million 399.63 million 676.83 million
Sony >350.99 million ~92 million >442.99 million
Microsoft 113.1 million 113.1 million
Sega 73.1–74.9 million >14.4 million >87.5 million
Atari >34.77 million >1 million >35.77 million
Hudson Soft/NEC 10 million 10 million
Bandai 3.2–3.5 million 3.2–3.5 million
Coleco >3 million >3 million
Magnavox/Philips >3 million >3 million
Mattel 3 million 3 million
Nokia 3 million 3 million
Total amount of every console with at least 1 million units sold.

Million-selling game consoles by firm

Million-selling handheld game consoles
Platform Firm Released Units sold Ref.
Nintendo DS Nintendo 2004 154.01 million [18]
Game Boy Nintendo 1989 118.69 million [note 2]
PlayStation Portable Sony 2004 82 million [note 1]
Game Boy Advance Nintendo 2001 81.51 million [18]
Nintendo 3DS Nintendo 2011 45.42 million [18]
Sega Game Gear Sega 1990 11 million [58]
PlayStation Vita Sony 2011 ~10 million [note 1]
WonderSwan Bandai 1999 3.2–3.5 million [note 8]
N-Gage Nokia 2003 3 million [75]
Atari Lynx Atari 1989 >1 million [note 10]
Sony's PlayStation Portable signified the company's debut in the handheld market. Forbes editor Penelope Patsuris noted "The competition marks the first time that a company with real clout has challenged the lock that Nintendo has had on handheld gaming for 15 years."[14]

Handheld game consoles

Million-selling home game consoles
Platform Firm Released Units sold Ref.
PlayStation 2 Sony 2000 >155 million [note 1]
PlayStation Sony 1994 102.49 million [32]
Wii Nintendo 2006 101.23 million [18]
Xbox 360 Microsoft 2005 84 million [note 3]
PlayStation 3 Sony 2006 >82.3 million [note 1]
Nintendo Entertainment System Nintendo 1983 61.91 million [18]
Super Nintendo Entertainment System Nintendo 1990 49.10 million [18]
Sega Genesis Sega 1988 40 million [note 4]
Nintendo 64 Nintendo 1996 32.93 million [18]
Atari 2600 Atari 1977 30 million [51]
Xbox Microsoft 2001 24 million [52]
GameCube Nintendo 2001 21.74 million [18]
Master System Sega 1986 13–14.8 million [note 5]
PlayStation 4 Sony 2013 13.5 million [57]
Dreamcast Sega 1998 10.6 million [59]
TurboGrafx-16 Hudson Soft/NEC 1987 10 million [60]
Sega Saturn Sega 1994 9.5 million [61]
Wii U Nintendo 2012 7.29 million [18]
Xbox One Microsoft 2013 5.1 million [note 3]
Atari 7800 Atari 1986 >3.77 million [note 6]
Sega Pico Sega 1993 >3.4 million [note 7]
Color TV Game *[72] Nintendo 1977 3 million [73]
Intellivision Mattel 1980 3 million [74]
ColecoVision Coleco 1982 >2 million [note 9]
Magnavox Odyssey² Magnavox/Philips 1978 2 million [79]
Philips CD-i Philips 1991 >1 million [note 11]
Telstar *[84] Coleco 1976 >1 million [note 12]
Atari 5200 Atari 1982 1 million [86]
The first popular home console, the Atari 2600 (1980 version pictured), was released in 1977.[87]
Only the PlayStation (top) and Wii (bottom) join the PlayStation 2 in home consoles surpassing 100 million units sold.

Home game consoles

Million-selling game consoles
Platform Firm Released Units sold Ref.
PlayStation 2 Sony 2000 >155 million [note 1]
Nintendo DS Nintendo 2004 154.01 million [18]
Game Boy Nintendo 1989 118.69 million [note 2]
PlayStation Sony 1994 102.49 million [32]
Wii Nintendo 2006 101.23 million [18]
Xbox 360 Microsoft 2005 84 million [note 3]
PlayStation 3 Sony 2006 >82.3 million [note 1]
PlayStation Portable Sony 2004 82 million [note 1]
Game Boy Advance Nintendo 2001 81.51 million [18]
Nintendo Entertainment System Nintendo 1983 61.91 million [18]
Super Nintendo Entertainment System Nintendo 1990 49.10 million [18]
Nintendo 3DS Nintendo 2011 45.42 million [18]
Sega Genesis Sega 1988 40 million [note 4]
Nintendo 64 Nintendo 1996 32.93 million [18]
Atari 2600 Atari 1977 30 million [51]
Xbox Microsoft 2001 24 million [52]
GameCube Nintendo 2001 21.74 million [18]
Master System Sega 1986 13–14.8 million [note 5]
PlayStation 4 Sony 2013 13.5 million [57]
Sega Game Gear Sega 1990 11 million [58]
Dreamcast Sega 1998 10.6 million [59]
PlayStation Vita Sony 2011 ~10 million [note 1]
TurboGrafx-16 Hudson Soft/NEC 1987 10 million [60]
Sega Saturn Sega 1994 9.5 million [61]
Wii U Nintendo 2012 7.29 million [18]
Xbox One Microsoft 2013 5.1 million [note 3]
Atari 7800 Atari 1986 >3.77 million [note 6]
Sega Pico Sega 1993 >3.4 million [note 7]
WonderSwan Bandai 1999 3.2–3.5 million [note 8]
Color TV Game *[72] Nintendo 1977 3 million [73]
Intellivision Mattel 1980 3 million [74]
N-Gage Nokia 2003 3 million [75]
ColecoVision Coleco 1982 >2 million [note 9]
Magnavox Odyssey² Magnavox/Philips 1978 2 million [79]
Atari Lynx Atari 1989 >1 million [note 10]
Philips CD-i Philips 1991 >1 million [note 11]
Telstar *[84] Coleco 1976 >1 million [note 12]
Atari 5200 Atari 1982 1 million [86]
The last two members of the DS product line, the DSi (left) and DSi XL (right) helped to further drive sales, moving 41.37 million units combined.[18]
The Nintendo DS product line are the best-selling handheld consoles, selling 154.01 million units worldwide. The original (left) sold 18.78 million units. The majority of sales came from the DS Lite (right) at 93.86 million units.[18]

  Atari    Microsoft    Nintendo    Sega    Sony    Other 

The following tables contain video game consoles and handheld game consoles that have sold at least 1 million units worldwide either through to consumers or inside retail channels. Each console include sales from every iteration unless otherwise noted. Dedicated consoles are marked with an asterisk (*) next to the platform's name, while current generation consoles are marked with a cross (†). The years correspond to when the video game console or handheld game console was first released. Each year links to the corresponding "year in video gaming". Hardware firms with a brown, green, red, blue, or violet background and the name Atari, Microsoft, Nintendo, Sega, or Sony, respectively have more than two consoles listed; those with a white background do not.

Million-selling game consoles

Contents

  • Million-selling game consoles 1
    • Home game consoles 1.1
    • Handheld game consoles 1.2
  • Million-selling game consoles by firm 2
  • Notes 3
  • References 4

PlayStation 2 has over 10,828 software titles, and 1.52 billion units of software were sold worldwide as of December 2010.[16] Nintendo DS has over 2,000 software titles (as of August 2013),[17] and 944.61 million units of software sold worldwide as of June 2014.[18]

A handheld game console is a lightweight device with a built-in screen, games controls, speakers,[9] and has greater portability than a standard video game console.[3] It is capable of playing multiple games unlike tabletop and handheld electronic game devices. Tabletop and handheld electronic game devices of the 1970s and 1980s are the precursors of handheld game consoles.[10] Mattel introduced the first handheld electronic game with the 1977 release of Auto Race.[11] Later, several companies—including Coleco and Milton Bradley—made their own single-game, lightweight tabletop or handheld electronic game devices.[12] The oldest handheld game console with interchangeable cartridges is the Milton Bradley Microvision in 1979.[13] Nintendo is credited with popularizing the handheld console concept with the Game Boy's release in 1989[10] and continues to dominate the handheld console market.[14][15]

[8]'s 1972 release—the first commercially available video game console.Magnavox Odyssey. This resulted in Magnavox along with company employees Bill Harrison and Bill Rusch licensed their television gaming technology to contemporary major TV manufacturer Ralph H. Baer engineer Sanders Associates [7][6][5].consumer electronics and other personal computer Gaming consoles in general are also described as "dedicated" in distinction from the more versatile [4] can only play built-in games.Dedicated consoles [2]

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