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List of United States political families (C)

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Title: List of United States political families (C)  
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List of United States political families (C)

The following is an alphabetical list of political families in the United States whose last name begins with C.

Contents

The Cabaniss and McRaes

The Cadwaladers

  • Thomas Cadwalader (1708–1779), New Jersey House Burgess, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Common Councilman; Pennsylvania Colony Councilman 1755-1775. Father of John Cadwalader and Lambert Cadwalader.
    • John Cadwalader (1742–1786), Maryland Assemblyman. Son of Thomas Cadwalder.
    • Lambert Cadwalader (1742–1823), Pennsylvania Colony Assemblyman, member of the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Committee of Correspondence; delegate to the Pennsylvania Constitutional Convention 1776; Delegate to the Continental Congress from New Jersey 1785-1787; U.S. Representative from New Jersey 1789-1791 1793-1795. Son of Thomas Cadwalader.
      • Samuel Ringgold (1770–1829), Maryland House Delegate 1795, Maryland State Senator 1801-1806, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1810-1815 1817-1821. Son-in-law of John Cadwalader.

NOTE: Lambert Cadwalader was also brother-in-law of Continental Congressional Delegate Samuel Meredith.[84]

The Cadys

  • Daniel Cady (1773–1859), New York Assemblyman 1808-1813, Supervisor of Johnstown, New York 1809-1810; District Attorney in New York 1813; U.S. Representative from New York 1815-1817; Justice of the New York Supreme Court 1847-1855; Judge of Court of Appeals. Uncle of John W. Cady.[85]
    • John W. Cady (1790–1854), Clerk of Johnstown, New York 1814 1816-1817; Supervisor of Montgomery County, New York 1818-1822 1826-1829; New York Assemblyman 1822; U.S. Representative from New York 1823-1825; District Attorney of Fulton County, New York 1840–1846; Justice of the Peace of Johnstown, New York 1853. Nephew of Daniel Cady.[86]

The Caffertas and Vucanoviches

  • Barbara Vucanovich (1921-), U.S. Representative from Nevada 1983-1997. Mother of Patricia Dillon Cafferta.
    • Patricia Dillon Cafferta, Treasurer of Nevada, District Attorney in Nevada. Daughter of Barbara Vucanovich.

The Cafferys

  • Donelson Caffery (1835–1906), U.S. Senator from Louisiana 1893-1901. Grandfather of Patrick T. Caffery.[87]
    • Patrick T. Caffery (1932-), Louisiana State Representative 1864-1968, U.S. Representative from Louisiana 1869-1873. Grandson of Donelson Caffery.[88]

The Cains

The Calabrese Family of Cleveland, Ohio

Anthony O. Calabrese Sr., Ohio state senator and Anthony O. Calabrese Jr., Ohio attorney, state representative, jurist, and prominent Cleveland Republican. Anthony O. Calabrese Jr. served in the Ohio House of Representatives, for three terms, from 1960 to 1966.

From 1991 to 2003, Calabrese, Jr. served as a judge of the Cuyahoga County, Ohio, Court of Common Pleas.

In 2002, Calabrese was elected to the bench of the Ohio Court of Appeals, Eighth Appellate District, and began serving there in February 2003.

The Calhoons and McWillies

  • William McWillie (1795-1869), South Carolina State Senator 1836-1840, U.S. Representative from Mississippi 1849-1851, Governor of Mississippi 1857-1859. Father-in-law of S. S. Calhoon.[91]
    • S. S. Calhoon (1838-1908), Circuit Court Judge in Mississippi 1876-1882, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1888, delegate to the Mississippi Constitutional Convention 1890, Justice of the Mississippi State Supreme Court 1900-1908. Son-in-law of William McWillie.[92]

NOTE: S. S. Calhon was also son of [93]

The Calhouns and Pickens

  • John E. Colhoun (1749–1802), member of the South Carolina Legislature, U.S. Senator from South Carolina 1801-1802. First cousin of Joseph Calhoun and John Caldwell Calhoun.[94]
  • Joseph Calhoun (1750–1817), South Carolina State Representative 1804-1805, U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1807-1811. First cousin of John E. Colhoun and John Caldwell Calhoun.[95]
  • John Caldwell Calhoun (1782–1850), South Carolina State Representative 1808, U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1811-1817, U.S. Secretary of War 1817-1825, Vice President of the United States 1825-1832, U.S. Senator from South Carolina 1832-1843 1845-1850, U.S. Secretary of State 1844-1845. First cousin and son-in-law of John E. Colhoun and first cousin of Joseph Calhoun.[96]
  • Andrew Pickens (1739–1817), South Carolina State Representative 1781-1794 1800-1812, delegate to the South Carolina Constitutional Convention 1790, U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1793-1795, candidate for U.S. Senate from South Carolina 1797. Brother-in-law of John E. Colhoun.
    • Thomas Green Clemson (1807–1888), U.S. Chargé d'Affaires to Belgium 1844-1851. Son-in-law of John Caldwell Calhoun.[97]
    • Andrew Pickens (1779–1838), Governor of South Carolina 1816-1818. Son of Andrew Pickens.[98]
    • Atlanta, Georgia 1862-1865. Cousin of John Caldwell Calhoun.
      • Francis W. Pickens (1805–1869), South Carolina State Representative 1832-1834, U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1834-1843, South Carolina State Senator 1844-1846, U.S. Minister to Russia 1858-1860, Governor of South Carolina 1860-1862. Son of Andrew Pickens.[99]
      • Fulton County, Georgia 1881-1887. Son of James Calhoun.

NOTE: Matthew C. Butler was also son of U.S. Representative William Butler,[101] grandson of U.S. Representative William Butler,[102] nephew of U.S. Senator Andrew Pickens Butler[103] and South Carolina Governor Pierce M. Butler,[104] first cousin of Rhode Island legislator James DeWolf Perry,[105] and first cousin by marriage of U.S. diplomat August Belmont.[106]

The Calls and Collins

  • Richard K. Call (1792–1862), U.S. Congressional Delegate from Florida Territory 1823, Governor of Florida Territory 1836-1839 1841-1844, candidate for Governor of Florida 1845. Uncle of Wilkinson Call.[107]
    • Wilkinson Call (1834–1910), U.S. Senator from Florida 1879-1897. Nephew of Richard K. Call.[108]
      • LeRoy Collins (1909–1991), Florida State Representative 1934-1940, Florida State Senator 1940-1954, Governor of Florida 1955-1961, candidate for U.S. Senate from Florida 1968. Great-grandson-in-law of Richard K. Call.[109]
        • LeRoy Collins, Jr., candidate for Republican nomination for U.S. Senate from Florida 2006. Son of LeRoy Collins.[110]

NOTE: Wilkinson Call was also cousin of U.S. Senator James D. Walker.[111]

The Calverts

  • Cecilius Calvert (1605–1675), Proprietor of Maryland Colony 1632-1675. Brother of Leonard Calvert.
  • Leonard Calvert (1606–1647), Governor of Maryland Colony 1634-1647. Brother of Cecilius Calvert.[112]
    • Charles Calvert (1637–1715), Deputy Governor of Maryland Colony 1661-1675, Governor of Maryland Colony 1675-1689. Son of Cecilius Calvert.
      • Benedict Calvert (1679–1715), Governor of Maryland Colony. Son of Charles Calvert.
        • Charles Calvert (1699–1751), Proprietor of Maryland Colony 1715-1751, Governor of Maryland Colony 1721-1727. Son of Benedict Calvert.
        • Benedict Leonard Calvert, Governor of Maryland Colony 1727-1731. Son of Benedict Calvert.
          • Frederick Calvert (1731–1771), Proprietor of Maryland 1751-1771. Son of Charles Calvert.
          • Robert Eden (1741–1784), Governor of Maryland Colony 1769-1776. Son-in-law of Charles Calvert.

NOTE: Cecilius Calvert was also Governor of Lee family.

The Camachos

The Camerons

  • William Cameron (1795–1877), delegate to the Republican National Convention 1860. Brother of Simon Cameron.[116]
  • Simon Cameron (1799–1889), U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania 1845-1849 1857-1861 1867-1877, U.S. Secretary of War 1861-1862, U.S. Minister to Russia 1862. Brother of William Cameron.[117]
    • J. Donald Cameron (1833–1918), U.S. Secretary of War 1876-1877, U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania 1877-1897, Chairman of the Republican National Committee 1879-1880. Son of Simon Cameron.[118]
      • J.G. Bradley, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1916. Grandson of Simon Cameron.[119]

NOTE: J. Donald Cameron was also nephew-in-law of U.S. Secretary of State and of the Treasury John Sherman and U.S. Secretary of War William Tecumseh Sherman.[120] J.G. Bradley was also grandson of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Joseph P. Bradley[121] and grandson-in-law of U.S. Secretary of State Thomas F. Bayard, Sr..[122]

The Camdens

The Campbells

  • Lewis D. Campbell (1811–1882), candidate for U.S. Representative from Ohio 1840 1842 1844 1858, U.S. Representative from Ohio 1849-1858 1871-1872, U.S. Minister to Mexico 1866-1867, Ohio State Senator 1869-1870, delegate to the Ohio Constitutional Convention 1873. Uncle of James E. Campbell.[125]
    • James E. Campbell (1843–1924), U.S. Representative from Ohio 1884-1889, Governor of Ohio 1890-1892, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1892 1920 1924, candidate for Governor of Ohio 1895. Nephew of Lewis D. Campbell.[126]

The Campbells of South Carolina

  • John Campbell (1795–1845), U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1829-1831 1837-1845. Brother of Robert B. Campbell.[127]
  • Robert B. Campbell, candidate for U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1820, U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1823-1825 1834-1837, South Carolina State Senator, South Carolina State Representative 1840, U.S. Consul in Havana, Cuba 1842-1850; U.S. Consul in London, England 1854-1861. Brother of John Campbell.[128]

The Campbells of South Carolina (II)

  • Carroll Campbell, Jr. (1940–2005), candidate for South Carolina State Representative 1969, South Carolina State Representative 1970-1974, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1976 1980 1984 1988 1992, candidate for Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina 1974, South Carolina State Senator 1976-1978, U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1979-1987, Governor of South Carolina 1987-1995, candidate for Republican nomination for President of the United States 1996. Father of Mike Campbell.[129]
    • Mike Campbell, candidate for the Republican nomination for Lieutenant Governor of South Carolina 2006. Son of Carroll Campbell, Jr.[130]

The Campbells of Virginia

  • David Campbell (1779–1859), Virginia State Senator 1820-1824, Governor of Virginia 1837-1840. Brother of John Campbell.
  • John Campbell, Treasurer of the United States 1829-1839. Brother of David Campbell.

The Candlers

NOTE: Allen D. Candler and Milton A. Candler were also second cousins once removed of U.S. Representative Mark Anthony Cooper[136] and third cousins once removed of U.S. Senator Joseph Meriwether Terrell.[137] Milton A. Candler was also son-in-law of U.S. Representative Charles Murphey.[138]

The Candlers of Georgia

  • Samuel C. Candler (1809–1873), [139]
    • [140]
    • John Slaughter Candler (1861–1941), Georgia Superior Court Judge 1896-1902, Justice of the Georgia Supreme Court 1902-1906. Son of Samuel C. Candler.[141]

The Cannons

The Cannons of Delaware

  • William Cannon (1809–1865), Governor of Delaware 1863-1865. Father of Philip L. Cannon.
    • Philip L. Cannon, Lieutenant Governor of Delaware 1901-1905. Son of William Cannon.[142]

The Cantwells

The Capertons

  • Hugh Caperton (1781–1847), Sheriff of Monroe County, Virginia 1805; Virginia House Delegate 1810-1813 1826-1830; U.S. Representative from Virginia 1813-1815. Father of Allen T. Caperton.[144]
    • Allen T. Caperton (1810–1876), Virginia House Delegate 1841-1842 1857-1861, Virginia State Senator 1844-1848, delegate to the Virginia Constitutional Convention 1850 1861, Confederate States Senator from Virginia 1864-1865, U.S. Senator from Virginia 1875-1876. Son of Hugh Caperton.[145]

The Cappers and Crawfords

  • Samuel J. Crawford (1835–1913), Kansas State Representative 1861, Republican National Committeeman 1866-1868, Governor of Kansas 1865-1868. Father-in-law of Arthur Capper.[146]
    • Arthur Capper (1865–1951), Governor of Kansas 1915-1919, U.S. Senator from Kansas 1919-1949, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1936. Son-in-law of Samuel J. Crawford.[147]

The Cardins

  • Meyer M. Cardin, Maryland House Delegate 1935-1937, Baltimore, Maryland Circuit Court Judge 1967-1977. Brother of Maurice A. Cardin.[148]
  • Maurice A. Cardin, Maryland House Delegate 1951-1966. Brother of Meyer M. Cardin.
    • Benjamin L. Cardin (1943-), Maryland House Delegate 1967-1986, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1987-2007, U.S. Senator from Maryland 2007–present. Son of Meyer M. Cardin.[149]
      • Jon S. Cardin, Maryland House Delegate 2003–present. Nephew of Benjamin L. Cardin.[150]

The Cardozos

  • Albert Cardozo (1828–1885), Justice of the New York Supreme Court. Father of Benjamin N. Cardozo.[151]
    • Benjamin N. Cardozo (1870–1938), Justice of the New York Supreme Court 1914-1917, Judge of the New York Court of Appeals 1914-1926, Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals 1927-1932, Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court 1932-1938. Son of Albert Cardozo.[152]

The Carews and Magners

  • Thomas F. Magner (1860–1945), New York Assemblyman 1888, U.S. Representative from New York 1889-1895. Uncle of John F. Carew.[153]
    • John F. Carew (1873–1951), New York Assemblyman 1904, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1912 1924, U.S. Representative from New York 1913-1929, Justice of the New York Supreme Court 1929-1943. Nephew of Thomas F. Magner.[154]

The Careys

  • Joseph M. Carey (1845–1924), U.S. Attorney of Wyoming Territory 1869-1871, Justice of the Wyoming Territory Supreme Court 1871-1876, Republican National Committeeman 1876-1897, Mayor of Cheyenne, Wyoming 1881-1885; U.S. Congressional Delegate from Wyoming Territory 1885-1890; U.S. Senator from Wyoming 1890-1895; Governor of Wyoming 1911-1915. Father of Robert D. Carey.[155]
    • Robert D. Carey (1878–1937), Progressive Party National Committeeman 1912-1916, Governor of Wyoming 1919-1923, U.S. Senator from Wyoming 1930-1937. Son of Joseph M. Cary.[156]

The Carlisles and Goodsons

  • John A. Goodson, Kentucky State Representative, Mayor of Covington, Kentucky 1860-1864. Father-in-law John G. Carlisle.[157]
    • John G. Carlisle (1835–1910), Kentucky State Representative 1859-1861, Kentucky State Senator 1866-1871, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1868, Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky 1871-1875, U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1877-1890, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representative 1883-1889, candidate for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States 1884, U.S. Senator from Kentucky 189-1893, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury 1893-1897. Son-in-law of John A. Goodson.[158]

The Carltons

  • Doyle E. Carlton (1887–1972), Florida State Senator 1917-1919, Governor of Florida 1929-1933, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1948. Relative of Vassar B. Carlton.[159]
  • Vassar B. Carlton, Justice of the Florida Supreme Court 1969-1974. Relative of Doyle E. Carlton.[160]

The Carmichaels

  • Jesse M. Carmichael, Probate Court Judge of Dale County, Alabama; Auditor of Alabama; Alabama Assemblyman; Alabama State Senator; Alabama Secretary of State; Circuit Court Judge in Alabama. Father of Archibald Hill Carmichael.[161]
    • Archibald Hill Carmichael (1864–1947), Alabama Solicitor 1890-1894, Alabama State Representative 1907-1911 1915-1919, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1916 1928 1932, Alabama State Senator 1919-1923, member of the Alabama State Board of Education 1919-1947, member of the Tuscumbia, Alabama Board of Education 1920-1947; U.S. Representative from Alabama 1933-1937. Son of Jesse M. Carmichael.[162]

The Carmichaels of Maryland

  • William Carmichael (1739–1795), Delegate to the Continental Congress from Maryland 1778-1779, U.S. Chargé d'Affaires to Spain 1782-1794. Granduncle of Richard Bennett Carmichael.[163]
    • Richard Bennett Carmichael (1807–1884), Maryland House Delegate 1831 1841-1866, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1833-1835, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1856 1864 1868 1876, Judge of Maryland Circuit Court 1858-1864, Judge of Queen Anne's County, Maryland Court 1861; President of the Maryland Constitutional Convention 1867. Grandnephew of William Carmichael.[164]

The Carnahans

The Carrs

  • Francis Carr (1751–1821), Massachusetts State Representative 1791-1795 1801-1803, Massachusetts State Senator 1809-1811, U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1812-1813. Father of James Carr.[170]
    • James Carr (1777–1818), Massachusetts State Representative 1806-1811, U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1815-1817. Son of Francis Carr.[171]

The Carringtons and Prestons

  • James H. Preston (1860–1938), Maryland House Delegate 1890-1894, Mayor of Baltimore, Maryland 1911-1919; delegate the Democratic National Convention 1912. Father-in-law of Edward C. Carrington, Jr.[172]
    • Edward C. Carrington, Jr. (1872–1938), delegate to the Republican National Convention 1912, candidate for U.S. Senate from Maryland 1914, candidate for Borough President of Manhattan, New York City 1931. Son-in-law of James H. Preston.[173]

NOTE: Edward C. Carrington, Jr. was also grandson of U.S. Attorney Edward Carrington.[174]

The Carrolls

The Carrolls of Maryland were a very active family during the early history of the United States

The Carrolls of Tennessee

The Carsons

  • Julia Carson (1938–2007), Indiana State Representative 1972-1976, Indiana State Senator 1976-1990, U.S. Representative from Indiana 1997-2007. Grandmother of Andre Carson.[184]

The Carters of Georgia

The Carters of Kentucky

  • J.C. Carter (1863–1949), Circuit Court Judge in Kentucky, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1932. Father of James C. Carter, Jr. and Tim Lee Carter.[190]
    • James C. Carter, Jr. (1903–1998), Kentucky State Representative 1936-1937, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1960. Son of J.C. Carter.[191]
    • Tim Lee Carter (1910–1987), U.S. Representative from Kentucky 1965-1981, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1972. Son of J.C. Carter.[192]

The Carters, Graysons, Monroes, Orrs, and Smallwoods

  • William Grayson (1740–1790), Virginia House Delegate 1784-1785 1788, Delegate to the Continental Congress from Virginia 1785-1787, U.S. Senator from Virginia 1789-1790. Cousin of James Monroe.[193]
  • James Monroe (1758–1831), Virginia House Delegate 1782 1786 1810-1811, Delegate to the Continental Congress from Virginia 1783-1786, U.S. Senator from Virginia 1790-1794, U.S. Minister to France 1794-1796, Governor of Virginia 1799-1802 1811, U.S. Minister to Great Britain 1803-1807, U.S. Secretary of State 1811-1814 1815-1817, U.S. Secretary of War 1814-1815, President of the United States 1817-1825, delegate to the Virginia Constitutional Convention 1829. Cousin of William Grayson.
  • William Smallwood (1732–1792), Governor of Maryland 1785-1788, Maryland State Senator 1791-1792. Brother-in-law of William Grayson.[201]

NOTE: James Monroe was also nephew of Continental Congressional Delegate Joseph Jones,[205] distant cousin of Kentucky Secretary of State Thomas Monroe.[206]

The Carterets

The Cases

The Cases and Holts

The Caseys of Illinois

The Caseys of Pennsylvania

The Caseys are a family originally from New York City, but settled in Scranton, Pennsylvania after World War II.

  • Bob Casey, Sr., (January 9, 1932 – May 30, 2000); unsuccessful candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania in 1966, 1970, 1978; Auditor General of Pennsylvania 1969–1977; Governor of Pennsylvania 1987–1995.[228]
    • Bob Casey, Jr., (April 13, 1960-); Auditor General of Pennsylvania 1997–2005; Treasurer of Pennsylvania 2005–2006; US Senator (2007-); son of Bob Casey, Sr. [229]
    • Patrick Casey, candidate for U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1998 2000. Son of Robert P. Casey, Sr.[230]

The Casses and Ballengers

  • Lewis Cass (1782–1866), U.S. Representative from Ohio 1806-1807, Governor of Michigan 1813-1831, U.S. Secretary of War 1831-1836, U.S. Minister to France 1836-1842, U.S. Senator from Michigan 1845-1848 1849-1857, candidate for President of the United States 1848, U.S. Secretary of State 1857-1860. Great-great grandfather of Cass Ballenger.[231]
    • Cass Ballenger (1926-), North Carolina State Representative 1974-1976, North Carolina State Senator 1976-1986, U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1986-2005. Great-great grandson of Lewis Cass.[232]

The Castors

  • Elizabeth Castor (1941-), Florida State Senator 1977-1978 1983-1986, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 2004, candidate for U.S. Senate from Florida 2004. Wife of Samuel P. Bell III.[233]
  • Samuel P. Bell III, Florida State Representative 1980. Husband of Elizabeth Castor.[234]

The Catrons

  • Thomas B. Catron (1840–1921), Attorney General of New Mexico Territory 1869-1872, U.S. Attorney of New Mexico Territory 1872-1878, New Mexico Territory Councilman 1884, U.S. Congressional Delegate from New Mexico Territory 1895-1897, U.S. Senator from New Mexico 1912-1917. Father of Charles C. Catron.[235]
    • Charles C. Catron (1879–1951), Justice of the New Mexico Supreme Court 1929-1931. Son of Thomas B. Catron.[236]

The Catts

  • Sidney Johnston Catts (1863–1936), Governor of Florida 1917-1921. Father of Sidney Johnston Catts, Jr.[237]
    • Sidney Johnston Catts, Jr., delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1940. Son of Sidney Johnston Catts.[238]

The Celebrezzes

See Celebrezze family

The Chafees

  • John Chafee (1922–1999), Governor of Rhode Island 1963-1969, U.S. Secretary of the Navy 1969-1972, U.S. Senator from Rhode Island 1976-1999. Father of Lincoln Chafee.
    • Lincoln Chafee (1953–present), Mayor of Warwick RI 1992-1999, U.S. Senator from Rhode Island 1999-2007, Governor of Rhode Island 2010–present

NOTE: See also The Lippitts.

The Chaffees and Grants

  • Jerome B. Chaffee (1825–1886), Colorado Territory Representative 1861-1863, Republican National Committeeman 1866-1868 1870-1872, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1868, U.S. Congressional Delegate from Colorado Territory 1871-1875, U.S. Senator from Colorado 1876-1879, Chairman of the Colorado Republican Party 1884. Father-in-law of Ulysses S. Grant, Jr.[239]

NOTE: Ulysses S. Grant, Jr. was also son of U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant[241] and brother of U.S. Minister Frederick Dent Grant.[242]

The Chalmers

  • John G. Chalmers (1801–1847), member of the Virginia Legislature, Texas Republic Secretary of the Treasury 1841. Brother of Joseph W. Chalmers.[243]
  • Joseph W. Chalmers (1806–1853), U.S. Senator from Mississippi 1845-1847. Brother of John G. Chalmers.[244]
    • James Ronald Chalmers (1831–1898), Mississippi State Senator 1876-1877, U.S. Representative from Mississippi 1877-1882. Son of Joseph W. Chalmers.[245]
    • H.H. Chalmers, Justice of the Mississippi Supreme Court 1898. Son of Joseph W. Chalmers.[246]

The Chambers

  • Henry H. Chambers (1790–1826), delegate to the Alabama Constitutional Convention 1819, Alabama State Representative 1820, candidate for Governor of Alabama 1821 1823, U.S. Senator from Alabama 1925-1826. Father of Henry Cousins Chambers.[247]
    • Henry Cousins Chambers (1823–1871), member of the Mississippi Legislature 1859, Confederate States Representative from Mississippi 1862-1865. Son of Henry H. Chambers.[248]

The Chambers and Coxes

  • James M. Cox (1870–1957), U.S. Representative from Ohio 1909-1913, Governor of Ohio 1913-1915 1917-1921, candidate for President of the United States 1920. Father of Anne Cox Chambers.[249]

The Chamberlains

  • William Chamberlain (1755–1828), Vermont State Representative 1785 1787-1796 1805 1808, delegate to the Vermont Constitutional Convention 1791 1814, Vermont Governor's Councilman 1796-1803, U.S. Representative from Vermont 1803-1805 1809-1911, Lieutenant Governor of Vermont 1813-1815. Grandfather of Joshua Chamberlain.

The Chandlers

The Chandlers of Maine

  • John Chandler (1762–1841), Massachusetts State Senator 1803-1805, U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1805-1809, Sheriff of Kennebec County, Maine; member of the Massachusetts General Court 1819; Maine State Senator 1819-1820; U.S. Senator from Maine 1820-1829. Brother of Thomas Chandler.[253]
  • Thomas Chandler (1772–1866), New Hampshire State Senator 1817-1819 1825-1828, New Hampshire State Representative 1828, U.S. Representative from New Hampshire 1829-1833. Brother of John Chandler.[254]
    • Zachariah Chandler (1813–1879), Mayor of Detroit, Michigan 1851-1852; U.S. Senator from Michigan 1857-1875 1879; U.S. Secretary of the Interior 1875-1877; Chairman of the Republican National Committee 1876-1879. Nephew of John Chandler and Thomas Chandler.[255]
      • Eugene Hale (1836–1918), Prosecuting Attorney of Hancock County, Maine; member of Maine Legislature the 1867-1868; U.S. Representative from Maine 1869-1879; U.S. Senator from Maine 1881-1911. Son-in-law of Zachariah Chandler.[256]
        • Frederick Hale (1874–1963), Maine State Representative 1905-1906, Republican National Committeeman 1912-1918, U.S. Senator from Maine 1917-1941. Son of Eugene Hale.[257]

NOTE: Fredrick Hale was also cousin of U.S. Representative Robert Hale.[259]

The Chandlers of Tennessee

  • Walter Chandler (1887–1967), Tennessee State Representative 1917, Tennessee State Senator 1921, U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1935-1940, Mayor of Memphis, Tennessee 1940-1946 1955; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1940 1944. Father of J. Wyeth Chandler.[260]
    • J. Wyeth Chandler (1930–2004), Mayor of Memphis, Tennessee 1972-1982; Circuit Court Judge in Tennessee 1982-1996. Son of Walter Chandler.[261]

The Chandlers and Hales

  • John P. Hale (1806–1873), New Hampshire State Representative 1832, U.S. Attorney of New Hampshire 1834-1841, U.S. Representative from New Hampshire 1843-1845, U.S. Senator from New Hampshire 1847-1853 1855-1865, candidate for President of the United States 1852, U.S. Minister to Spain 1865-1869. Father-in-law of William E. Chandler.[262]
    • William E. Chandler (1835–1917), New Hampshire State Representative 1862-1964 1881, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1868 1880, Republican National Committeeman, delegate to the New Hampshire Constitutional Convention 1876 1902, U.S. Secretary of the Navy 1882-1885, U.S. Senator from New Hampshire 1887-1889 1889-1901. Son-in-law of John P. Hale.[263]
      • John P.H. Chandler, Jr. (1911–2001), New Hampshire State Representative 1943, New Hampshire Governor's Councilman 1953-1959, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1956 1960 1972 1980, New Hampshire State Senator 1961, candidate for U.S. Representative from New Hampshire 1962. Grandson of William E. Chandler.[264]

The Chanlers

  • John W. Chanler (1826–1877), New York Assemblyman 1858-1859, candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 1860, U.S. Representative from New York 1863-1869. Father of William A. Chanler and Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler.[265]
    • William A. Chanler (1867–1934), New York Assemblyman 1897, U.S. Representative from New York 1899-1901. Son of John W. Chanler.[266]
    • Lewis Stuyvesant Chanler (1869–1942), Lieutenant Governor of New York 1907-1908, candidate for Governor of New York 1908, New York Assemblyman 1910-1912. Son of John W. Chanler.[267]

The Chapmans

  • John Grant Chapman (1798–1856), Maryland House Delegate 1824-1832 1843-1844, Maryland State Senator 1832-1836, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1845-1849. Father of Andrew Grant Chapman.[268]
    • Andrew Grant Chapman (1839–1892), Maryland House Delegate 1867-1868 1870 1872 1879 1885, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1881-1883, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1888. Son of John Grant Chapman.[269]

The Chases, Smiths and Spragues

  • Dudley Chase (1771–1846), Prosecuting Attorney of Orange County, Vermont 1803-1812; Vermont State Representative 1805-1812 1823-1824; delegate to the Vermont Constitutional Convention 1814 1822; U.S. Senator from Vermont 1813-1817 18125-1831; Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court 1817-1821. Uncle of Salmon P. Chase.[270]
    • Salmon P. Chase (1808–1873), Cincinnati, Ohio City Councilman 1840–1849; U.S. Senator from Ohio 1849-1855 1861; Governor of Ohio 1856-1860; U.S. Secretary of the Treasury 1861-1864; candidate for the Republican nominations for President of the United States 1864; Chief Justice of the United States 1864-1873; candidate for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States 1868; candidate for President of the United States 1872. Nephew of Dudley Chase.[271]
    • Horatio N. Smith (1820-1886), Wisconsin State Assemblyman 1849, Wisconsin State Senator 1853-1854. Nephew by marriage of Dudley Chase.

NOTE: Dudley Chase was also uncle of U.S. Representative Dudley C. Denison.[273] William Sprague was also the nephew of U.S. Senator William Sprague III.[274]

The Chavezes and Tristanis

  • Dennis Chavez (1888–1962), member of the New Mexico Legislature, U.S. Representative from New Mexico 1930-1934, U.S. Senator from New Mexico 1935-1962. Grandfather of Gloria Tristani.[275]
    • Gloria Tristani (1953-), member of the New Mexico Corporation Commission 1994-1997, member of the Federal Communications Commission 1997-2001, candidate for U.S. Senate from New Mexico 2002. Granddaughter of Dennis Chavez.[276]

The Cheathams

  • Richard Cheatham (1799–1845), Tennessee State Representative 1833, delegate to the Tennessee Constitutional Convention 1834, candidate for U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1830 1832 1834, U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1837-1839. Brother of Anderson Cheatham.[277]
  • Anderson Cheatham, Tennessee State Representative 1801-1809 1819-1821 1823-1825. Brother of Richard Cheatham.[278]

NOTE: Edward S. Cheatham was also son-in-law of U.S. Senator Ephraim Hubbard Foster.[282]

The Cheathams and Whites

  • North Carolina State Representative 1881, North Carolina State Senator 1885, Solicitor in North Carolina 1886-1894, Prosecuting Attorney in North Carolina 1886-1894, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1896 1900, U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1897-1901. Brother-in-law of Henry P. Cheatham.
  • Henry P. Cheatham (1857–1935), Register of Deeds of Vance County, North Carolina 1884-1888; U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1889-1893; candidate for the Republican nomination for U.S. Representative from North Carolina 1896; Recorder of Deeds of District of Columbia 1897-1901. Brother-in-law of George Henry White.

The Cheneys and Perrys

=Colony 1698-1727. Son of John Cranston.[292]

NOTE: Samuel Cranston was also nephew of Rhode Island Colony Governor Walter Clarke.

The Cranstons of Rhode Island

  • Robert B. Cranston (1791–1873), Sheriff of Newport County, Rhode Island 1818-1827; Postmaster of Newport, Rhode Island 1827; U.S. Representative from Rhode Island 1837-1843 1847-1849; Rhode Island State Representative 1843-1847; Rhode Island State Senator; Mayor of Newport, Rhode Island 1853. Brother of Henry Y. Cranston.[293]
  • Henry Y. Cranston (1789–1864), Clerk of Rhode Island Court of Common Pleas 1818-1833, Rhode Island State Representative 1827-1843 1847-1854, U.S. Representative from Rhode Island 1843-1847. Brother of Robert B. Cranston.[356]

    The Cravens

    • Felix Ives Batson (1819–1871), Arkansas State Court Judge 1853, Justice of the Arkansas Supreme Court 1858, Confederate States Representative from Arkansas 1862-1865. Father-in-law of Jordan E. Cravens.[358]
      • Jordan E. Cravens (1830–1914), Arkansas State Representative 1860, Arkansas State Senator 1866-1868, U.S. Representative from Arkansas 1877-1883, Circuit Court Judge 1890-1894. Son-in-law of Felix Ives Batson.[359]
      • William B. Cravens (1872–1939), U.S. Representative from Arkansas 1907-1913 1933-1939. Cousin of Jordan E. Cravens.[360]

    The Cravens of Indiana

    • James H. Cravens (1802–1876), Indiana State Representative 1831-1832 1856, Indiana State Senator 1839, U.S. Representative from Indiana 1841-1843, candidate for Governor of Indiana 1852, candidate for Attorney General of Indiana 1856. Second cousin of James A. Cravens.[362]
    • James A. Cravens (1818–1893), Indiana State Representative 1848-1849, Indiana State Senator 1850-1853, U.S. Representative from Indiana 1861-1865, delegate to the National Union Convention, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1868. Second cousin of James H. Cravens.[363]
      • Aaron Asbury Cravens, Indiana State Representative 1893 1899. Son of James A. Cravens.[364]

    The Crawfords

    • [365]
    • George W. Crawford (1798–1872), Attorney General of Georgia 1827-1831, U.S. Representative from Georgia 1843, Governor of Georgia 1843-1847, U.S. Secretary of War 1849-1850. Cousin of William H. Crawford.

    The Cresaps

    • Luther Martin (1748–1826), Attorney General of Maryland 1778-1805 1818-1822, Delegate to the Continental Congress from Maryland 1784. First cousin by marriage of Joseph Cresap, James Cresap, and Thomas Cresap.[366]
    • Joseph Cresap (1755–1827), Maryland State Senator 1816-1820. First cousin by marriage of Luther Martin.[367]
    • James Cresap (1770–1836), Maryland House Delegate. First cousin by marriage of Luther Martin.[368]
    • Thomas Cresap (1772–1845), Orphan's Court Judge in Maryland. First cousin by marriage of Luther Martin.[369]

    The Crisfields and Pages

    • John Woodland Crisfield (1806–1897), Maryland State Representative 1836, U.S. Representative from Maryland 1847-1849 1861-1863, delegate to the Maryland Constitutional Convention 1850, delegate to the Union Party National Convention 1866. Father of Henry Page.[370]
      • Henry Page (1841–1913), delegate to the Maryland Constitutional Convention 1867, State Attorney of Somerset County, Maryland 1870-1884; U.S. Representative from Maryland 1891-1892; Judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals 1892; Chief District Court Judge in Maryland 1892-1908. Son of John Woodland Crisfield.[371]

    The Crisps

    The Crittendens

    • John Crittenden, Sr. (1754–1809), member of the Virginia House of Burgesses 1790-1805. Father of John J. Crittenden, Thomas T. Crittenden, and Robert Crittenden.[374]
      • John J. Crittenden (1786–1863), Kentucky State Representative, U.S. Senator from Kentucky 1817-1819 1835-1841 1842-1848 1855-1861, U.S. District Attorney in Kentucky 1827-1829, Attorney General of the United States 1841 1850-1853, Governor of Kentucky 1848-1850. Son of John Crittenden, Sr.[375]
      • Thomas T. Crittenden (1788–1832), Kentucky Secretary of State 1828-1832. Son of John Crittenden, Sr.[376]
      • Robert Crittenden (1797–1834), Secretary of Arkansas Territory 1819-1829, Governor of Arkansas Territory 1828-1829. Son of John Crittenden, Sr.[377]

    The Crocherons

    The Crocketts

    • David S. Crockett (1786–1836), Tennessee State Representative 1821-1823, candidate for U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1825, U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1827-1831 1833-1835. Father of John Wesely Crockett.[382]
      • John Wesley Crockett (1807–1852), U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1837-1841, Attorney General in Tennessee 1841-1843. Son of David S. Crockett.[383]

    NOTE: David S. Crockett is also grandfather of Portia Rebecca Crockett, who is former sister-in-law of California State Senator Thomas Hayden.

    The Crocketts of Michigan

    • [322]
      • George W. Crockett III, candidate for Michigan State Representative 1966, Circuit Court Judge in Michigan 2001. Son of George W. Crockett, Jr.[322]

    The Crofts

    • South Carolina State Representative 1882-1883 1901-1902, South Carolina State Senator, U.S. Representative from South Carolina 1903-1904. Father of Theodore G. Croft.[384]

    The Crofts of Alaska

    • Leland Chancy Croft (1937-), Alaska State Representative 1969-1971, Alaska State Senator 1971-1979, candidate for Governor of Alaska 1978. Father of Eric Croft
      • Eric Chancy Croft (1964-), Alaska State Representative 1997-2007, candidate for Governor of Alaska 2006, candidate for Mayor of Anchorage, Alaska 2009. Son of Leland Chancy Croft

    The Crows

    The Crowninshields

    The Crumpackers

    • Edgar D. Crumpacker (1851–1920), Prosecuting Attorney in Indiana 1884-1888, Appellate Judge in Indiana 1891-1893, U.S. Representative from Indiana 1897-1913. Father of Maurice E. Crumpacker.[390]
      • Maurice E. Crumpacker (1886–1927), candidate for Republican nomination for U.S. Representative from Oregon 1922, U.S. Representative from Indiana 1925-1927. Son of Edgar D. Crumpacker.[391]
      • Shepard Crumpacker, Jr. (1917–1986), U.S. Representative from Indiana 1951-1957. Cousin of Edgar D. Crumpacker and Maurice E. Crumpacker.[392]

    The Cuellars

    • Henry Cuellar (1955-), candidate for U.S. Representative from Texas 2002, U.S. Representative from Texas 2005–present. Brother of Martin J. Cuellar.
    • Martin J. Cuellar (1958-), Sheriff of Webb County, Texas-elect. Brother of Henry Cuellar.

    The Culbersons

    • David B. Culberson (1830–1900), Texas State Representative 1859 1864, Texas State Senator, U.S. Representative from Texas 1875-1897. Father of Charles Allen Culberson.[393]
      • Charles Allen Culberson (1855–1925), Attorney General of Texas 1890-1894, Governor of Texas 1894-1898, U.S. Senator from Texas 1899-1923. Son of David B. Culberson.[394]
      • John Culberson (1956-), Texas State Representative 1986-2001, U.S. Representative from Texas 2001–present. Cousin of Charles Allen Culberson.[395]

    The Culloms

    • Alvan Cullom (1797–1877), Tennessee State Representative 1835-1836, U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1843-1847, Circuit Court Judge in Tennessee 1850-1852. Brother of William Cullom.[396]
    • William Cullom (1810–1896), Tennessee Assemblyman 1843-1847, U.S. Representative from Tennessee 1851-1855 1856-1857, Attorney General in Tennessee 1873-1878. Brother of Alvan Cullom.[397]
      • Shelby Moore Cullom (1829–1914), Attorney of Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Representative 1856 1860-1861 1873-1874; U.S. Representative from Illinois 1865-1871; Governor of Illinois 1877-1883; U.S. Senator from Illinois 1883-1913. Nephew of Alvan Cullom and William Cullom.[398]

    The Culpeppers

    The Culvers

    • John Culver (1932-), U.S. Representative from Iowa 1965-1975, U.S. Senator from Iowa 1975-1981. Father of Chester Culver.[401]
      • Chester J. Culver (1966-), Iowa Secretary of State 1999-2007, Governor of Iowa 2007–2011. Son of John Culver.[402]
      • Mariclare Culver, delegate to the Democratic National Convention 2008. Wife of Chester J. Culver.[403]

    The Cummings

    NOTE: Alfred Cumming was also great-grandson-in-law of Continental Congressional Delegate Samuel Adams.[406]

    The Cunninghams, Paynes, and Methvins

    • Milton Joseph Cunningham, member of the Louisiana House 1878 to 1880 and Louisiana Senate 1880 to 1884 from Natchitoches and DeSoto parishes; state attorney general from 1884 to 1888 and 1892 to 1900, administrator of Orleans Parish 1900 to 1904, lawyer and landowner, father of William Tharp Cunningham and Charles Milton Cunningham and grandfather of W. Peyton Cunningham[407]
      • William Tharp Cunningham (1871-1952), planter, lawyer, state court judge, and state representative in Natchitoches, Louisiana, son of Milton Joseph Cunningham, brother of Charles Milton Cunningham, and uncle of W. Petyon Cunningham[408]
      • Charles Milton Cunningham (1877-1936), lawyer in Natchitoches, Louisiana, publisher of The Natchitoches times 1903 to 1930, Louisiana state senator from Natchitoches Parish 1915-1922, son of Milton Joseph Cunningham, brother of William Tharp Cunningham, brother-in-law of John William Payne, and father of W. Peyton Cunningham[409]
      • John William Payne (1877-1933), sheriff of Natchitoches Parish, 1901-1933, succeeded as sheriff by son William "Bill" Payne; brother-in-law of Charles Milton Cunningham and uncle of W. Peyton Cunningham[410]
        • W. Peyton Cunningham (1901-1971), lawyer in Natchitoches, Louisiana, member of the Louisiana House of Representatives 1932 to 1940, son of Charles Milton Cunningham, nephew of William Tharp Cunningham and John William Payne, and grandson of Milton Joseph Cunningham[411]
        • Myrtis Methvin (1895-1977), first woman to serve as mayor of Castor in Bienville Parish; second woman mayor in Louisiana history, mother of DeWitt T. Methvin, Jr., grandmother of Mildred Methvin[412]

    The Cuomos

    For more information, see Cuomo family

    NOTE: Andrew Cuomo is also former son-in-law of U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy.[429] Chris Cuomo is a reporter from CNN.

The Curleys

  • John J. Curley (1873–1944), delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1928, Treasurer of Boston, Massachusetts 1932. Brother of James Michael Curley.[430]
  • James Michael Curley (1874–1958), Massachusetts State Representative 1902-1903, U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1911-1914 1943-1947, Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts 1914-1917 1922-1925 1930-1933 1946-1949; candidate for Governor of Massachusetts 1924 1938; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1928 1936 1940 1944 1948 1952 1956; Governor of Massachusetts 1935-1937; candidate for U.S. Senate from Massachusetts 1936; candidate for Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts 1937 1941 1951 1955; Democratic National Committeeman 1941-1943 1947. Brother of John J. Curley.[431]

The Currys

The Currys of Louisiana

The Curtins, Greggs, and McLanahans

  • Andrew Gregg (1755–1835), U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1791-1807, U.S. Senator from Pennsylvania 1807-1813, Pennsylvania Secretary of State 1820-1823, candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania 1823. Grandfather of James Xavier McLanahan, Andrew Gregg Curtin, and David McMurtie Gregg.[421]
    • James Xavier McLanahan (1809–1861), Pennsylvania State Senator 1842-1844, U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1849-1853. Grandson of Andrew Gregg.[435]
    • Andrew Gregg Curtin (1817–1894), Pennsylvania Secretary of State, Pennsylvania Superintendent of Public Instruction, Governor of Pennsylvania 1861-1867, U.S. Minister to Russia 1869-1872, U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania 1881-1887. Grandson of Andrew Gregg.[436]
    • David McMurtie Gregg (1833–1916), U.S. Consul to Prague, Austria-Hungary. Grandson of Andrew Gregg.[421]

The Cushings and Wildes

  • Samuel Wilde, Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court. Father-in-law of Caleb Cushing.[438]
    • Caleb Cushing (1800–1879), Massachusetts State Representative 1825 1828 1833-1834 1847 1858-1859 1862-1863, Massachusetts State Senator 1826, U.S. Representative from Massachusetts 1835-1843, U.S. Minister to China 1843-1845, candidate for Governor of Massachusetts 1847 1848, Mayor of Newburyport, Massachusetts 1851-1852; Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court 1853; U.S. Attorney General 1853-1857; delegate to the Democratic National Convention 1860; U.S. Minister to Spain 1874-1877. Son-in-law of Samuel Wilde.[427]

The Cuthberts

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