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Ad·ver·sary

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Ad·ver·sary

Ad·ver·sary
Jairus Khan
Background information
Origin Canada
Genres Industrial
Years active 2005 (2005)-present
Labels Tympanik Audio
Glitch Mode Recordings
Associated acts Antigen Shift
Members Jairus Khan

Ad·ver·sary is an industrial project fronted by Jairus Khan, based in Toronto.

Background

Ad·ver·sary has heavily toured the United States and Canada with Iszoloscope, and has acted as tour support for Terrorfakt, Antigen Shift, and Adam X. His remix work includes material from Iszoloscope, Converter, Cyanotic and Urusai.

In 2008,[1] Ad·ver·sary signed to the Tympanik Audio label to release his debut album Bone Music, which was also made available as a free download under Creative Commons licensing [1]. The critically acclaimed album was mastered by Yann Faussurier of Iszoloscope, containing remixes by Antigen Shift, Tonikom, and Synapscape. [2][3][4][5][6]

Khan's sister is the Juno nominated artist Eternia.

Controversy

At the 2012 Kinetik Festival, Ad·ver·sary criticized headlining acts Combichrist and Nachtmahr from the stage, playing a five minute video during his last song that "openly critiques ... the use of misogynist and racist tropes in those band’s music and publicity materials".[7] The presentation ended with the words "Reject racism. Reject sexism. Reject what the industry is telling you. Reject formulaic bullshit. Reject what you are being sold. We can do better. We deserve better. We demand better." [8]

Discography

  • Cyanotic vs Ad·ver·sary - Music For Jerks (EP, 2005)
  • Bone Music (CD, 2008)
  • A Bright Cut Across Velvet Sky (CD, 2009)

References

  1. ^ Tympanik Audio News, March 04 2008, ([2]).
  2. ^ "Bone Music" review, Side-Line Magazine, [3].
  3. ^ "Bone Music" review, ChainDLK ([4]).
  4. ^ "Bone Music" review, ChainDLK ([5]).
  5. ^ "Bone Music" review, ReGen ([6]).
  6. ^ "Bone Music" review, Connexion Bizarre ([7]).
  7. ^ "Kinetik Update 2012: Ad·ver·sary’s Performance". Retrieved 22 May 2012. 
  8. ^ "Ad·ver·sary: Making a statement in the industrial music scene". Retrieved 22 May 2012. 

External links

  • Official Site
  • Official MySpace
  • Ad·ver·sary at discogs.com


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