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Turk Jamat

Turk
Total population
2,500[1]
Regions with significant populations
 India Pakistan
Languages
UrduGujaratiHindi
Religion
Islam 100% •
Related ethnic groups
TurkTurk of Uttar PradeshMughal

The Turk Jamat are a Muslim community found in the state of Gujarat in India.[2] Many members of Turk Jamat Muslim community migrated to Pakistan after the independence in 1947 and settled in Karachi.

Contents

  • History and origin 1
  • Present circumstances 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

History and origin

The Turk Jamat claim descent from Turk soldiers who served in the army of the Nawabs of Junagadh. They claim to be earliest Muslim settlers to the Sorath region of Kathiawar, and claim to have come from Central Asia as soldiers in the army of Alauddin Khilji. The community are still found mainly in the taluka of Verawal in Junagadh District. They are also found in the talukas of Keshod, Una, and Mandvi of Junagadh District. The community are Gujarati speaking, using the Kathiawari dialect.[3]

Present circumstances

The Turk Jamat have fourteen clans, the main ones being the Saraiki Turk (Living in District Rahim Yar Khan, Southern Punjab Pakistan), Mughal, Mori, Gori, Mirza, Gobi, Chauhan, Rathore, Shelat, Agwan, Hala, Tajwani, Tavani, Kajal, Khokhar and Regowa. Among these the Mughal, Mirza and Shelat are three numerically dominant sections. All these clans have equal status and intermarry. They are endogamous, and marriage is preferred with close kin, and they practice both cross cousin and parallel cousin marriage.[4]

The community had traditionally served as soldiers in the armies of the various

  1. ^ http://www.joshuaproject.net/people-profile.php?rog3=IN&peo3=18274
  2. ^ People of India Gujarat Volume XXI Part Three edited by R.B Lal, P.B.S.V Padmanabham, G Krishnan & M Azeez Mohideen pages 1394–1399
  3. ^ People of India Gujarat Volume XXI Part Three edited by R.B Lal, P.B.S.V Padmanabham, G Krishnan & M Azeez Mohideen pages 1394-1399
  4. ^ People of India Gujarat Volume XXI Part Three edited by R.B Lal, P.B.S.V Padmanabham, G Krishnan & M Azeez Mohideen pages 1394-1399
  5. ^ People of India Gujarat Volume XXI Part Three edited by R.B Lal, P.B.S.V Padmanabham, G Krishnan & M Azeez Mohideen pages 1394-1399

References

See also

[5]

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