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Source Economics

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Title: Source Economics  
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Source Economics

Open-source economics is an economic platform based on open collaboration for the production of software, services, or other products.

First applied to the open-source software industry,[1] this economic model may be applied to a wide range of enterprises.

Some characteristics of open-source economics may include: work or investment is carried out without express expectation of return; products or services are produced through collaboration between users and developers; there is no direct individual ownership of the enterprise itself.

As of recently there were no known commercial organizations outside of software that employ open-source economics as a structural base.[2] Today there are organizations that provide services and products, or at least instructions for building such services or products, that use an open-source economic model.[3][4]

The structure of open source is based on user participation. "networked environment makes possible a new modality of organizing production: radically decentralized, collaborative, and non-proprietary; based on sharing resources and outputs among widely distributed, loosely connected individuals who cooperate with each other without relying on either market signals or managerial commands."[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ Josh Lerner, Jean Tirole. "Some Simple Economics of Open Source". The Journal of Industrial Economics. Retrieved 23 February 2012. 
  2. ^ Josh Lerner, Jean Tirole. "THE ECONOMICS OF TECHNOLOGY SHARING: OPEN SOURCE AND BEYOND". Page 28. NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH. Retrieved 24 February 2012. 
  3. ^ Global Village Construction Set. "Open source ecology". Industrial Machines. Retrieved 24 February 2012. 
  4. ^ Arduino. "Open-source electronics". Retrieved 24 February 2012. 
  5. ^ Yochai, Benkler. "The Wealth of Networks". Chapter 3. Yale University Press. Retrieved 24 February 2012. 

External links

  • Yochai Benkler on the new open-source economics
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