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1945 Indiana Hoosiers football team

 

1945 Indiana Hoosiers football team

1945 Indiana Hoosiers football
Big Ten Conference Champions
Conference Big Ten Conference
1945 record 9–0–1 (5–0–1 Big Ten)
Head coach Bo McMillin (12th year)
Captain Russ Deal
Home stadium Memorial Stadium
1945 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
#4 Indiana $ 5 0 1     9 0 1
#6 Michigan 5 1 0     7 3 0
#12 Ohio State 5 2 0     7 2 0
Northwestern 3 3 1     4 4 1
Purdue 3 3 0     7 3 0
Wisconsin 2 3 1     3 4 2
Illinois 1 4 1     2 6 1
Minnesota 1 5 0     4 5 0
Iowa 1 5 0     2 7 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1945 Indiana Hoosiers football team represented the Indiana University Bloomington in the 1945 college football season, compiled the only undefeated record and won the first Big Ten Conference championship in the program's history. In their 12th year under head coach Bo McMillin, the Hoosiers compiled a 9–0–1 record (5–0–1 Big Ten), outscored their opponents by a combined total of 279 to 56, and finished the season ranked #4 in the final AP Poll. The lone blemish on the team's record was a 7-7 tie with Northwestern in the second game of the season.[1]

Head coach Bo McMillin was selected as the Coach of the Year by his fellow college football coaches. Four Hoosier players also received first-team honors on either the Ted Kluszewski also received first-team All-Big Ten honors. Pihos and Taliaferro were later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

Quarterback Ben Raimondi led the team in passing, completing 35 of 83 passes for 593 yards and 10 touchdowns with three interceptions. Mel Groomes was the team's leading receiver with 12 catches for 223 yards.[2] In 1948, Groomes became the first African-American player to sign with the Detroit Lions

Contents

  • Schedule 1
  • Season summary 2
    • Pre-season 2.1
    • Week 1: at Michigan 2.2
    • Week 2: at Northwestern 2.3
    • Week 3: at Illinois 2.4
    • Game 4: Nebraska 2.5
    • Week 5: at Iowa 2.6
    • Game 6: Tulsa 2.7
    • Game 7: Cornell 2.8
    • Week 8: at Minnesota 2.9
    • Week 9: at Pittsburgh 2.10
    • Game 10: Purdue 2.11
    • Post-season 2.12
  • Players 3
    • Varsity letter winners 3.1
    • Reserves 3.2
    • Players in the NFL 3.3
  • Coaches and administrators 4
  • References 5

Schedule

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 22 at Michigan Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI W 13–7   27,536
September 29 at Northwestern Dyche StadiumEvanston, IL T 7–7   30,000
October 6 at Illinois Memorial StadiumChampaign, IL W 6–0   25,173
October 13 Nebraska Memorial StadiumBloomington, IN W 54–14   20,000
October 20 at Iowa Iowa StadiumIowa City, IA W 52–20   15,800
October 27 Tulsa Memorial Stadium • Bloomington, IN W 7–2   20,000
November 3 Cornell (IA) Memorial Stadium • Bloomington, IN W 46–6   6,000
November 10 at Minnesota Memorial StadiumMinneapolis, MN W 49–0   41,400
November 17 at Pittsburgh Pitt StadiumPittsburgh, PA W 19–0   5,000
November 24 Purdue Memorial Stadium • Bloomington, IN (Old Oaken Bucket) W 26–0   27,000
*Non-conference game. Homecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll released prior to game. All times are in Eastern Time.

Season summary

Pre-season

The 1944 Indiana football team compiled a 7–3 record and finished in fifth place in the Big Nine Conference. Players lost from the 1944 team included John Tavener, who was the consensus first-team center on the 1944 All-America Team. Bob Meyer was expected to fill Tavener's spot in the middle of the line, but he suffered a broken leg in the 1945 season opener against Michigan. John Cannady, who had previously been a fullback and linebacker, eventually won the job.[3]

Another loss from the 1944 team was halfback Robert Hoernschemeyer. Hoernschemeyer was a second-team All-Big Nine player in 1944, but he entered the Naval Academy after the 1944 season, played for the Navy Cadets in 1945, and then played 10 years of professional football.

On the other hand, several players returned from military service in time for the 1945 season. Most prominent among these was Pete Pihos and Howie Brown. Pihos was a lieutenant in the 35th Infantry Division, and Brown received three Purple Heart citations for his service in the European Theater of Operations. Neither had been discharged when the season began, but they were granted 60-day leaves by the Army and returned in time for the second game of the season against Northwestern.[4]

Week 1: at Michigan

Week 1: Indiana at Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Indiana 6 7 0 0 13
Michigan 0 0 7 0 7

On September 22, 1945, Indiana opened its season with a 13–7 victory over Michigan. Indiana scored a touchdown in the first quarter on a pass from

  1. ^ "Indiana Yearly Results (1945-1949)". College Football Data Warehouse. David DeLassus. Retrieved August 9, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "1945 Indiana Hoosiers Stats". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2015. 
  3. ^ Bob Hammel, Kit Klingelhoffer (1999). Glory of Old IU, Indiana University. Sports Publishing LLC. p. 101. 
  4. ^ Hammel & Klingelhoffer, Glory of Old IU, p. 100.
  5. ^ a b Wilfrid Smith (September 23, 1945). "Indiana Whips Wolverines on Passes, 13 to 7: Thwarts Rally in Closing Minutes". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  6. ^ a b Charles Bartlett (September 30, 1945). "Hoosiers Gain 7-7 Deadlock With Wildcats in Fourth Period". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  7. ^ a b "Indiana's 4th Quarter Pass Beats Illini, 6-0". Chicago Tribune. October 7, 1945. p. 2-1. 
  8. ^ a b Charles Bartlett (October 14, 1945). "Indiana Runs Up 54-14 Score on Nebraska". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  9. ^ a b Wilfrid Smith (October 20, 1945). "Hoosier Backs Run Wild To Top Iowa, 52-20". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  10. ^ a b Maurice Shevlin (October 28, 1945). "Indiana Deals First Defeat To Tulsa, 7-2". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  11. ^ a b "Indiana Drops Cornell, 46-6". The Salt Lake Tribune. November 4, 1945. p. 23 – via  
  12. ^ a b "Indiana Blasts Little Cornell College, 46 to 6". Chicago Tribune. November 4, 1945. p. 2-2. 
  13. ^ a b c d Wilfrid Smith (November 11, 1945). "Indian Wins, 49-0: Hoosier Backs Run Wild At Minneapolis; Tighten Grip on Big 9 Lead". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  14. ^ a b Maurice Shevlin (November 18, 1945). "Indian Makes Pitt Eleven 19-0 Victim". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  15. ^ "Indiana Topples Purdue 26 to 0 to win Big Ten championship". The Nebraska State Journal (AP story). November 25, 1945. p. 11 – via  
  16. ^ Edward Burns (November 25, 1945). "Indiana Routs Purdue, 26 to 0; Wins Big 9 Crown; Pihos Crashes Boilermaker Defense Twice". Chicago Tribune. p. 2-1. 
  17. ^ "Indiana Alumni Mob Bo and His New Champions". Chicago Tribune. November 25, 1945. p. 2-2. 
  18. ^ Murray Rose (December 4, 1945). "Everyone Agrees; Army Is in a Class By Itself on Grid". Miami Daily News-Record. p. 4 – via  
  19. ^ "M'Millin Named Coach of Year: Indiana Mentor Received 445 Points in Coaches' Poll Against 212 for Col Blaik". The News-Herald. December 17, 1945. p. 9 – via  
  20. ^ "2014 NCAA Football Records: Consensus All-America Selections" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2014. p. 6. Retrieved February 10, 2015. 
  21. ^ a b c d e f 1946 Indiana University yearbook, p. 101.
  22. ^ a b c d e Walter Byers (November 26, 1945). "Indiana and Ohio State Each Get Three Men on United Press All Star Big Ten Team". The Daily Register (Harrisburg,Illinois). p. 5. 
  23. ^ "Yank Magazine Has All-American Team". Morning Herald (Hagerstown, MD). 1945-12-21. 
  24. ^ a b c "Esser Wins Berth on All-Big-Ten Team". The Milwaukee Journal. November 26, 1945. p. L2. 
  25. ^ "1945 Heisman Trophy Voting". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 9, 2015. 
  26. ^ Walter Johns (1945-12-05). "Army Given Three Places on Captains' All-American". The Wisconsin State Journal. 
  27. ^ Lawton Carver (1945-12-02). "Warren Amling On INS '45 All-American Football Team". Lima News. 
  28. ^ "Six More Signed by Detroit Lions". The Pittsburgh Press (UP story). April 17, 1948. 
  29. ^ Charlie Sanders, Charlie Sanders Tales from the Detroit Lions, p. 25.
  30. ^ 1946 Indiana University yearbook, p. 89.

References

Coaches and administrators

In addition, Ted Kluszewski went on to play 15 seasons in Major League Baseball.

  1. Pete Pihos was selected by the Philadelphia Eagles with the 41st pick in the 1945 NFL Draft. He played nine years for the Eagles from 1947 to 1955 and was later inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
  2. Howie Brown was selected by the Green Bay Packers with the 206th pick in the 1946 NFL Draft. He played for the Detroit Lions from 1948 to 1950.
  3. John Cannady was selected by the New York Giants with the 22nd pick in the 1947 NFL Draft. He played eight seasons with the Giants from 1947 to 1954.
  4. Ben Raimondi was selected by the Chicago Cardinals with the 41st pick in the 1947 NFL Draft. He played for the New York Yankees (AAFC) in 1947.
  5. Bob Ravensberg was selected by the Cardinals with the 150th pick in the 1947 NFL Draft. He played for the Cardinals in 1948 and 1949.
  6. Dick Deranek was selected by the Pittsburgh Steelers with the 82nd pick in the 1948 NFL Draft, but did not play in the NFL.
  7. Mel Groomes was undrafted in 1948. Indiana head coach Bo McMillin became head coach and general manager of the Detroit Lions in 1948. One of McMillin's first personnel moves was signing Groomes to a contract with the Lions on April 17, 1948.[28] At the time, only one other NFL team, the Los Angeles Rams, had an African-American player, and Groomes was the first African-American to sign a contract with the Detroit Lions.[29] Groomes played for the Lions in 1948 and 1949.
  8. Lou Mihajlovich was undrafted in 1948, but went on to play for the Los Angeles Dons in 1948 and the Green Bay Packers in 1954.
  9. John Goldsberry was selected by the Cardinals with the 40th pick in the 1949 NFL Draft. Goldsberry played for the Cardinals in 1949 and 1950.
  10. Chicago Bears with the 129th pick in the 1949 NFL Draft. He played seven years in the NFL from 1949 to 1955.
  11. Nick Sebek was selected by the Washington Redskins with the 248th pick in the 1949 NFL Draft. He played for the Redskins in 1950.

Eleven players from the 1945 Indiana football team were either drafted to play or actually played in the National Football League. They are:

Players in the NFL

  • Jack Adams, #11
  • Bill Bradley
  • William Buckner
  • Joe Gilliam
  • John Gorski, #62
  • Hagmann, #75
  • Don Jones, #40
  • Pat Kane, #87
  • Francis Oleksak, #54 - started one game at center

Reserves

  • Bill Armstrong, #12
  • Charlie Armstrong, #72
  • Howie Brown, #73 - started 7 games at right guard
  • John Cannady, #38 - started 5 games at center
  • Frank Ciolli, #62 - started 1 game at left guard, 2 games at right guard
  • Russ Deal, #67 - started all 10 games at left tackle
  • Dick Deranek, #88 - started 2 games at right halfback
  • John Goldsberry, #78 - started all 10 games at right tackle
  • Mel Groomes, #57 - started 8 games at right halfback
  • Bob Harbison, #64
  • Allan Horn, #50 - started 2 games at center
  • Ted Kluszewski, #83 - started 7 games at right end
  • John Kokos, #43
  • Nick Lysohir, #33 - started first 2 games at fullback
  • Bob Meyer, #22 - started one game at center
  • Lou Mihajlovich, #81 - started 3 games at right end
  • Bob Miller, #10
  • Pete Pihos - started final 8 games at fullback
  • Ben Raimondi, #46 - started all 10 games at quarterback
  • Bob Ravensberg, #61 - started all 10 games at left end
  • Tom Schwartz, #82
  • Nick Sebek, #25
  • Joe Sowinski -started all 10 games, one at right guard and nine at left guard
  • Leroy Stovall
  • George Taliaferro, #44 - started all 10 games at left halfback

The following 25 players received varsity letters for their participation on the 1945 Indiana football team.[21] Players who started at least half of the team's ten games are displayed in bold.

Varsity letter winners

Players

  • End Bob Ravensberg was selected as a consensus first-team player on the 1945 All-America Team,[20] receiving first-team honors from Look magazine, The Sporting News, and the Football Writers Association of America.[21] He also received second-team All-American honors and second-team All-Big Ten honors from the United Press (UP).[22]
  • Fullback Pete Pihos received first-team All-American honors from Yank, the Army Weekly,[23] and second-team All-American honors from the UP, Associated Press (AP), and The Sporting News.[21] He also received first-team All-Big Ten honors from both the AP and UP.[24][22] Pihos also finished ninth in the voting for the 1945 Heisman Trophy.[25] He was later inducted into both the College Football Hall of Fame and the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
  • Freshman halfback Taliaferro was later inducted in the College Football Hall of Fame. [21][22][24] He also received third-team All-American honors from the AP and first-team All-Big Ten honors from both the AP and UP.[21][27][26].The Sporting News (INS), and International News Service, Central Press becoming the first African-American player to lead the conference in rushing yardage. He received second-team All-American honors from the [2]
  • End Ted Kluszewski received first-team All-Big Ten from both the AP and UP.[24][22] Kluszewski went on to play in Major League Baseball for 15 years.
  • Tackle John Goldsberry received second-team All-Big Ten from the UP.[21][22]

Several Indiana players also won post-season honors. These include:

Indiana head coach Bo McMillin was selected in voting by his fellow college football coaches as the 1945 "Coach of the Year". McMillin received 445 points and 63 first-place votes out of 155 ballots cast. Army's Earl Blaik finished second with 212 points and 28 first-place votes.[19]

The Associated Press released the results of its final poll on December 4, 1945. The 1945 Army Cadets football team was selected as the national champion with 1,160 points and first-place votes by 115 of 116 voters. Indiana was ranked fourth finished among the top four teams in the final AP Poll with 720 points.[18]

Post-season

Indiana's starting lineup against Purdue was Mel Groomes (right halfback), and Pihos (fullback).[13]

On November 24, 1945, the Hoosiers defeated Purdue by a 26–0 score at Memorial Stadium in Bloomington. With the victory, the Hoosiers claimed both the Old Oaken Bucket trophy and the first Big Ten Conference football championship in school history. After a scoreless first half, Pete Pihos scored two touchdowns in the third quarter. In the fourth quarter, Ben Raimondi threw touchdown passes to Ted Kluszewski and Lou Mihajlovich. The Hoosiers gained 349 rushing yards in the game. On defense, Indiana held Purdue's touted passing offense led by quarterback Bob DeMoss to one two-yard completion in 15 attempts.[16] After the game, Indiana University president Herman B Wells congratulated the team in the locker room and declared the following Monday to be a holiday with no classes to be held.[17]

Week 10: Purdue at Indiana
1 2 3 4 Total
Purdue 0 0 0 0 0
• Indiana 0 0 13 13 26
  • Date: November 24, 1945
  • Location: Memorial Stadium
    Bloomington, IN
  • Game attendance: 27,000[15]

Game 10: Purdue

Indiana's starting lineup against Pittsburgh was Ravensberg (left end), Russ Deal (left tackle), Joe Sowinski (left guard), Mel Groomes (right halfback), and Pihos (fullback).[14]

On November 17, 1945, Indiana defeated Pittsburgh by a 19–0 score in Pittsburgh. Fullback Pete Pihos scored two touchdowns, and Bob Ravensberg also scored a touchdown on a pass from Ben Raimondi. Indiana gained 192 rushing yards and held Pittsburgh to only 18 rushing yards.[14]

Week 9: Indiana at Pittsburgh
1 2 3 4 Total
Indiana 6 0 13 0 19
Pittsburgh 0 0 0 0 0
  • Date: November 17, 1945
  • Location: Pittsburgh
  • Game attendance: 5,000

Week 9: at Pittsburgh

Indiana's starting lineup against Minnesota was Bob Ravensberg (left end), Russ Deal (left tackle), Joe Sowinski (left guard), John Cannady (center), Howard Brown (right guard), John Goldsberry (right tackle), Ted Kluszewski (right end), Ben Raimondi (quarterback), Taliaferro (left halfback), Mel Groomes (right halfback), and Pihos (fullback).[13]

On November 10, 1945, Indiana limited Chicago Tribune called "the most decisive licking any Minnesota team ever has received."[13] Indiana scored its 49 points in the first three quarters, 28 of them in the second quarter, before turning the game over to its deep reserves. All 34 players on Indiana's traveling squad appeared in the game. Additional Indiana touchdowns were scored by Bob Miller, Pete Pihos, Dick Deranek, and Tom Schwartz. Indiana gained 245 rushing yards and 123 passing yards while holding Minnesota to 20 rushing yards and 90 passing yards.[13]

Week 8: Indiana at Minnesota
1 2 3 4 Total
Indiana 7 28 14 0 49
Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0
  • Date: November 10, 1945
  • Location: Minneapolis
  • Game attendance: 41,400
  • Referee: Rollie Barnum

Week 8: at Minnesota

Indiana's starting lineup against Cornell was Mel Groomes (right halfback), and Pete Pihos (fullback).[12]

[11] in Ann Arbor.Michigan-Minnesota game served as the acting head coach for the game, while head coach Bo McMillin scouted the Carl Anderson [12] On November 3, 1945, the Hoosiers defeated the

Week 7: Cornell at Indiana
1 2 3 4 Total
Cornell (IA) 0 0 0 6 6
Indiana 14 13 12 7 46
  • Date: November 3, 1945
  • Location: Memorial Stadium
    Bloomington, IN
  • Game attendance: 6,000[11]
  • Referee: Mike Layden

Game 7: Cornell

Indiana's starting lineup against Tulsa was Mel Groomes (right halfback), and Pete Pihos (fullback).[10]

On October 27, 1945, the Hoosiers defeated a previously undefeated safety. Indiana rushed for 224 yards in the game and held Tulsa to 80 rushing yards and five passing yards.[10]

Week 6: Tulsa at Indiana
1 2 3 4 Total
Tulsa 0 0 2 0 2
Indiana 0 7 0 7
  • Date: October 27, 1945
  • Location: Memorial Stadium
    Bloomington, IN
  • Game attendance: 20,000

Game 6: Tulsa

Indiana's starting lineup against Iowa was Ravensberg (left end), Russ Deal (left tackle), Joe Sowinski (left guard), Allan Horn (center), Howard Brown (right guard), John Goldsberry (right tackle), Lou Mihajlovich (right end), Raimondi (quarterback), Taliaferro (left halfback), Mel Groomes (right halfback), and Pete Pihos (fullback).[9]

On October 20, 1945, Indiana defeated Ben Raimondi to John Gorski and on a long pass from Raimondi to Deranek covering 48 yards. Indiana led 52-0 at the end of the third quarter and had allowed Iowa only two first downs. In the fourth quarter, Iowa scored 20 points against the Hoosier reserves. Indiana totaled 337 rushing yards and 94 passing yards, and held Iowa to 115 rushing yards and 134 passing yards.[9]

Week 5: Indiana at Iowa
1 2 3 4 Total
Indiana 20 20 12 0 52
Iowa 0 0 0 20 20
  • Date: October 20, 1945
  • Location: Iowa City, IA
  • Game attendance: 15,800

Week 5: at Iowa

[8] Indiana's starting lineup against Nebraska was Ravensberg (left end), Russ Deal (left tackle), Joe Sowinski (left guard), Allan Horn (center), Frank Ciolli (right guard), John Goldsberry (right tackle), Lou Mihajlovich (right end),

On October 13, 1945, the Hoosiers defeated Nebraska by a 54–14 score at Memorial Stadium in Bloomington. Indiana's eight touchdowns were scored by Dick Deranek, Pete Pihos, Mel Groomes, Bob Ravensberg, Bob Miller (95-yard kickoff return to start the second half), Bill Armstrong (2), and Tom Schwartz. The Hoosiers gained 517 yards on Nebraska, 272 rushing yards and 145 passing yards. Defensively, the Hoosiers held the Cornhuskers to 79 rushing yards and 117 passing yards.[8]

Week 4: Nebraska at Indiana
1 2 3 4 Total
Nebraska 0 0 7 7 14
Indiana 6 21 14 13 54
  • Date: October 13, 1945
  • Location: Memorial Stadium
    Bloomington, IN
  • Game attendance: 20,000
  • Referee: Ted O'Sullivan

Game 4: Nebraska

[7] Indiana's starting lineup against Illinois was

On October 6, 1945, Indiana defeated Illinois by a 6–0 score in Champaign, Illinois. In the second quarter, Mel Groomes threw a touchdown pass to Ted Kluszewski, but the play was called back because a Great Dane dog had gotten loose on the field during the play. In the third quarter, the Hoosiers moved the ball to the Illinois one-yard line, but the Illinois defense held. The Hoosiers did not score until the fourth quarter when Ben Raimondi threw a touchdown pass to Kluszewski. Defensively, the Chicago Tribune described Pete Pihos as a "demon," and the Hoosiers held the Illini to 113 rushing yards and 35 passing yards. Offensively, the Hoosiers gained 200 rushing yards and 41 passing yards.[7]

Week 3: Indiana at Illinois
1 2 3 4 Total
Indiana 0 0 0 6 6
Illinois 0 0 0 0 0
  • Date: October 6, 1945
  • Location: Memorial Stadium, Champaign, IL
  • Game attendance: 25,173
  • Referee: William A. Blake

Week 3: at Illinois

Indiana's starting lineup against Northwestern was Bob Ravensberg (left end), Russ Deal (left tackle), Joe Sowinski (left guard), Oleksak (center), Frank Ciolli (right guard), John Goldsberry (right tackle), Ted Kluszewski (right end), Raimondi (quarterback), Taliaferro (left halfback), Dick Deranek (right halfback), and Nick Lysohir (fullback).[6]

[6] On September 29, 1945, Indiana and

Week 2: Indiana at Northwestern
1 2 3 4 Total
Indiana 0 0 0 7 7
Northwestern 7 0 0 0 7

Week 2: at Northwestern

Indiana's starting lineup against Michigan was Bob Ravensberg (left end), Russ Deal (left tackle), Frank Ciolli (left guard), Bob Meyer (center), Joe Sowinski (right guard), John Goldsberry (right tackle), Kluszewski (right end), Raimondi (quarterback), Taliaferro (left halfback), Groomes (right halfback), and Nick Lysohir (fullback).[5]

[5]

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