World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

1-Iodomorphine

Article Id: WHEBN0028146880
Reproduction Date:

Title: 1-Iodomorphine  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Opioid
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

1-Iodomorphine

1-Iodomorphine
Identifiers
CAS number 64739-76-0
ChemSpider 9168496 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C17H18INO3
Molar mass 411.23 g mol−1
 YesY (verify) (what is: YesY/N?)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox references

1-Iodomorphine is a semi-synthetic narcotic analgesic formed by halogenation of the 1 position on the morphine carbon skeleton.[1][2][3] Halogenated morphine derivatives were first synthesised in Germany, Austria/Austria-Hungary, the United Kingdom and the United States in the period 1890 to 1930. Use of this drug increased after 1945 for the below-mentioned research. It is a research chemical which is often prepared in the laboratory when it is needed.

Along with the similar 2-iodomorphine as well as iodinated analogs of dihydromorphine, dihydrocodeine, heroin, and the fluorinated, chlorinated, and brominated analogues of this series, this change may not impact the activity of the drug to a notable extent but 1- and 2-iodomorphine are used in pharmacological, neurological, metabolic, and endocrine research as it allows the tagging of morphine with iodine-131 or iodine-129.[4] Such research was important in the discovery of opioid receptors in the central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, and other tissues in humans, mammals, birds, and some reptiles, amphibians, fish, insects, and arthropods.

More recently, research on fluoro-opioids has showed that this subcategory of the semi-synthetic opioids may be a promising direction for research for strong opioids with very rapid onset of action.

References

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.