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1922–23 Northern Rugby Football League season

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Title: 1922–23 Northern Rugby Football League season  
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Language: English
Subject: Rugby Football League Championship, Rugby league county leagues, Rugby league county cups, Hull F.C., Belle Vue (Wakefield), Jack Price (rugby league), Billy Stone (rugby league), Danny Hurcombe
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1922–23 Northern Rugby Football League season

1922–23 Rugby Football League season
League Northern Rugby Football League
Number of teams 27
Champions Hull Kingston Rovers
League Leaders Hull
Top point-scorer(s) Jim Sullivan (Wigan) 349
Top try-scorer(s) Johnny Ring (Wigan) 41
< 1921–22 Seasons 1923–24 >

The 1922–23 Rugby Football League season was the twenty eighth season of rugby league football.

Season summary

Pre-season the Northern Rugby Football Union decided to drop the 'Union' in favour of 'League' and the first annual conference of the League is held at Keswick.[1]

Hull Kingston Rovers moved from their Craven Street ground to Craven Park at the eastern end of Holderness Road this season. Their first game against Wakefield Trinity on 2 September ended in a 3-0 defeat.[2]

Wigan Highfield joined the League.

Hull Kingston Rovers won their first ever Championship when they defeated Huddersfield 15-5 in the play-off final.

Hull had finished the regular season as the league leaders and were the first in that position not to contend a play-off final.

The Challenge Cup was won by Leeds when they defeated Hull 28-3 in the final. [3]

Wigan won the Lancashire League, and Hull won the Yorkshire League. Wigan beat Leigh 20–2 to win the Lancashire Cup, and York beat Batley 5–0 to win the Yorkshire Cup.

Championship

Team Pld W D L PF PA Pts Pct
1 Hull 36 30 0 6 587 304 60 83.33
2 Huddersfield 34 26 0 8 644 279 52 76.47
3 Swinton 36 27 0 9 467 240 54 75
4 Hull Kingston Rovers 36 26 1 9 597 231 53 73.61
5 Wigan 36 25 2 9 721 262 52 72.22
6 Leigh 32 22 0 10 378 281 44 68.75
7 Oldham 36 24 0 12 389 236 48 66.66
8 Leeds 38 24 2 12 502 297 50 65.78
9 Rochdale Hornets 36 22 0 14 389 355 44 61.11
10 York 34 17 5 12 254 252 39 57.35
11 St. Helens Recs 36 19 0 17 319 292 38 52.77
12 Featherstone Rovers 34 17 1 16 413 368 35 51.47
13 Wakefield Trinity 36 17 2 17 349 306 36 50
14 Batley 36 16 2 18 347 372 34 47.22
15 Warrington 36 17 0 19 348 410 34 47.22
16 Barrow 36 16 0 20 339 444 32 44.44
17 Salford 36 14 2 20 263 421 30 41.66
18 Hunslet 38 14 2 22 316 371 30 39.47
19 St Helens 34 13 0 21 364 427 26 38.23
20 Halifax 38 14 1 23 272 442 29 38.15
21 Dewsbury 36 12 3 21 337 440 27 37.5
22 Widnes 34 11 1 22 195 350 23 33.82
23 Keighley 38 12 1 25 236 449 25 32.89
24 Broughton Rangers 32 10 1 21 230 319 21 32.81
25 Wigan Highfield 32 7 1 24 208 432 15 23.43
26 Bradford Northern 34 6 1 27 180 676 13 19.11
27 Bramley 36 5 2 29 184 572 12 16.66

Championship Play-Off

Semi-finals Championship Final
               
1  Hull 2  
4  Hull Kingston Rovers 16  
     Hull Kingston Rovers 15
   Huddersfield 5
2  Huddersfield 16
3  Swinton 5  

Challenge Cup

Leeds defeat Hull 28-3 in the final at Belle Vue, Wakefield to win their second Challenge Cup in their second appearance.[4]

References

Sources

  • 1922-23 Rugby Football League season at wigan.rlfans.com
  • The Challenge Cup at The Rugby Football League website
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