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2003–04 Southampton F.C. season

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Title: 2003–04 Southampton F.C. season  
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Language: English
Subject: Kevin Phillips (footballer), James Beattie (footballer), Chris Baird, Danny Higginbotham, Arron Davies, Rory Delap
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2003–04 Southampton F.C. season

Southampton F.C.
2003–04 season
Manager Gordon Strachan (until March)
Paul Sturrock (from March)
Stadium St Mary's Stadium
Premier League 12th
FA Cup Third round proper
League Cup Fifth round
UEFA Cup First round
Top goalscorer League:
James Beattie (14)
All:
James Beattie (17)
Highest home attendance 32,151 (vs. Arsenal, 29 December)
Lowest home attendance 30,513 (vs. Charlton Athletic, 7 December)
Average home league attendance 31,716

During the 2003–04 English football season, Southampton Football Club competed in the Premier League.

Season summary

The previous season's FA Cup runners-up failed to make an impact in any of the cup competitions, and their 12th place finish was a something of a disappointment after the previous season, when Southampton were eighth in the league - their highest ever in the Premiership and their highest in the top flight since 1990. The club was thrown into further turmoil in March, when Gordon Strachan announced his resignation as manager. There was talk that Glenn Hoddle would be returning to the club for a second spell, but the job went to Plymouth Argyle's Paul Sturrock instead.

First-team squad

Squad at end of season

Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
2 England DF Jason Dodd
3 England DF Graeme Le Saux
5 Norway DF Claus Lundekvam
6 Scotland DF Stephen Crainey
7 England FW Kevin Phillips
8 England MF Matt Oakley
9 England FW James Beattie
10 Scotland MF Neil McCann
11 Sweden DF Michael Svensson
12 Sweden MF Anders Svensson
13 England GK Paul Smith
14 Finland GK Antti Niemi
15 England DF Fitz Hall
16 England DF Martin Cranie
17 Latvia FW Marian Pahars
18 Republic of Ireland MF Rory Delap[1]
19 England DF Danny Higginbotham
No. Position Player
20 England MF David Prutton
21 Norway FW Jo Tessem
22 England DF Darren Kenton
23 Wales MF Arron Davies
24 England FW Dexter Blackstock[2]
25 England GK Michael Poke
26 England DF Matt Mills
27 England FW Leon Best[3]
28 Northern Ireland GK Alan Blayney
29 France MF Fabrice Fernandes
30 France MF Léandre Griffit
31 France MF Yoann Folly[4]
32 Northern Ireland DF Chris Baird
33 Scotland DF Paul Telfer
34 Ecuador FW Agustin Delgado
35 England DF Mike Williamson
36 England FW Brett Ormerod

Left club during season

Note: Flags indicate national team as has been defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
1 Wales GK Paul Jones (to Wolverhampton Wanderers)
4 England MF Chris Marsden (to Busan I'cons)
6 England DF Paul Williams (to Stoke City)
16 England MF Mark Draper (retired)
No. Position Player
21 Norway FW Jo Tessem (on loan to Lyn)
25 England DF Garry Monk (to Barnsley)
27 England GK Scott Bevan (to Wimbledon)

Results

Premier League

FA Cup

League Cup

  • Third round: Bristol City 1-3 Southampton; attendance 17,408

UEFA Cup

  • Southampton Tommy Skjerven (Norway)
  • 1-0 Southampton (Raducanu 82) referee Stefan Johannesson (Sweden)

Statistics

References

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