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2004 Michigan Wolverines football team

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Title: 2004 Michigan Wolverines football team  
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Subject: 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season, Mike Hart (American football), Big Ten Conference football individual awards, 2004 Illinois Fighting Illini football team, 2004 Indiana Hoosiers football team
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2004 Michigan Wolverines football team

2004 Michigan Wolverines football
Big Ten Co-Champions
Rose Bowl, L 38–37 vs. Texas
Conference Big Ten Conference
Ranking
Coaches #12
AP #14
2004 record 9–3 (7–1 Big Ten)
Head coach Lloyd Carr (10th year)
Offensive coordinator Terry Malone (3rd year)
Offensive scheme Multiple
Defensive coordinator Jim Herrmann (8th year)
Base defense Multiple
MVP Braylon Edwards
Captain David Baas
Captain Marlin Jackson
Home stadium Michigan Stadium
(Capacity: 107,501)
2004 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team   W   L         W   L  
#14/12 Michigan §   7 1         9 3  
#8/8 Iowa §   7 1         10 2  
#17/18 Wisconsin   6 2         9 3  
Northwestern   5 3         6 6  
#20/19 Ohio State   4 4         8 4  
Purdue   4 4         7 5  
Michigan State   4 4         5 7  
Minnesota   3 5         7 5  
Penn State   0* 6         0* 7  
Illinois   1 7         3 8  
Indiana   1 7         3 8  
† – BCS representative as conference champion
§ – Conference co-champions

The 2004 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan during the 2004 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team's head football coach was Lloyd Carr. The Wolverines played their home games at Michigan Stadium. The team won its second consecutive Big Ten Championship.[1]

Schedule

Date Time Opponent# Rank# Site TV Result Attendance
September 4, 2004 12:00 PM Miami (OH)* #8/7 Michigan StadiumAnn Arbor, MI ABC W 43–10   110,815
September 11, 2004 3:30 PM at Notre Dame* #8/7 Notre Dame StadiumNotre Dame, IN (Rivalry) NBC L 20–28   80,795
September 18, 2004 12:00 PM San Diego State* #17/17 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI ESPN W 24–21   109,432
September 25, 2004 3:30 PM Iowa #19/18 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI ABC W 30–17   111,428
October 2, 2004 3:30 PM at Indiana #19/18 Memorial StadiumBloomington, IN ABC W 35–14   35,001
October 9, 2004 12:00 PM #13/13 Minnesotadagger #14/14 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI (Little Brown Jug) ESPN W 27–24   111,518
October 16, 2004 12:00 PM at Illinois #14/13 Memorial StadiumChampaign, Il ABC W 30–19   55,725
October 23, 2004 3:30 PM at #12/12 Purdue #13/11 Ross–Ade StadiumWest Lafayette, IN ABC W 16–14   65,170
October 30, 2004 3:30 PM Michigan State #12/11 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI (Paul Bunyan Trophy) ABC W 45–37 3OT  111,609
November 13, 2004 12:10 PM Northwestern #9/9 Michigan Stadium • Ann Arbor, MI ABC W 42–20   111,347
November 20, 2004 1:00 PM at Ohio State #7/7 Ohio StadiumColumbus, OH (The Game) ABC L 21–37   105,456
January 1, 2005 5:00 PM vs. #6/5 Texas* #13/12 Rose BowlPasadena, CA (Rose Bowl) ABC L 37–38   93,468
*Non-conference game. daggerHomecoming. #Rankings from AP Poll / Coaches' Poll released prior to game. All times are in Eastern Time.

Game notes

Miami (OH)

Miami (OH) at #8/#7 Michigan
1 2 3 4 Total
Miami (OH) 0 0 3 7 10
Michigan 0 10 14 19 43
  • Source: ESPN


Indiana

1 2 3 4 Total
Michigan 7 7 21 0 35
Indiana 0 7 0 7 14
  • Source: ESPN.com



Minnesota

#13 Minnesota at #14 Michigan
Little Brown Jug
1 2 3 4 Total
Minnesota 7 7 7 3 24
Michigan 10 7 0 10 27
  • Source: ESPN


Statistical achievements

Braylon Edwards surpassed Anthony Carter's 22-year-old career conference record of 37 touchdown receptions by totaling 39, which continues to be the conference record.[2] He tied the NCAA record with three 1000-receiving yard seasons.[3]

Mike Hart was the Big Ten rushing individual statistical champion (151.8 yards per conference games and 121.2 yards per game).[4] Braylon Edwards was the Big Ten receiving statistical champion for all games with 8.1 receptions per contest, but Purdue's Taylor Stubblefield won the title for conference games. Edwards swept the yardage titles with 110.8 per game and 108.9 per conference game.[5]

Hart set the current school record for single-season 200-yard games (3), surpassing five predecessors with 2 each.[6] Braylon Edwards set numerous school records: single-season receptions (97), surpassing Marquise Walker's 86 from 2001; single-season receiving yards (1330), surpassing Walker's 1143; career receptions (252), surpassing Walker's 176; career yards (3541) surpassing Anthony Carter's 3076 set in 1982; career touchdown receptions (39), surpassing Carter's 37; consecutive games with a reception (38), surpassing Walker's 32; consecutive 100-yard reception games (4 tying his own record from the prior year), surpassing Desmond Howard, Carter and Marcus Knight who all had 3 in various seasons. Only consecutive 100-yard games has been surpassed (by Mario Manningham in 2007).[7] Chad Henne tied Elvis Grbac's 1991 single-season record of 25 touchdown passes.[8]

Starting lineup offense

Awards and honors

The individuals in the sections below earned recognition for meritorious performances.[9][10]

National

Conference

Team

Coaching staff

References

  1. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide".  
  2. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide".  
  3. ^ "2009 Division I Football Records Book: Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) Records".  
  4. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide".  
  5. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide".  
  6. ^ "Record Book".  
  7. ^ "Record Book".  
  8. ^ "Record Book".  
  9. ^ "2004 Football Team". The Regents of the University of Michigan. April 9, 2007. Retrieved July 8, 2010. 
  10. ^ "Big Ten Conference Football Full Media Guide".  
  11. ^ "Michigan's Academic All-Americans".  

External links

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