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476th Fighter Group

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Title: 476th Fighter Group  
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Subject: 57th Operations Group, Glasgow Air Force Base, 29th Air Division, O'Hare Air Reserve Station, 302d Operations Group
Collection: Aerospace Defense Command Units, Fighter Groups of the United States Air Force, Fighter Groups of the United States Army Air Forces, Military Units and Formations Disestablished in 1943, Military Units and Formations Disestablished in 1944, Military Units and Formations Established in 1943, Military Units and Formations Established in 1956, Military Units and Formations in Georgia (U.S. State), Military Units and Formations of the United States Air Force Reserves, Military Units and Formations of the United States in World War II
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476th Fighter Group

476th Fighter Group
476th Fighter Group - A-10 Thunderbolt II
Active 1943–1943; 1943–1944; 1957–1960; 2009–present
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Type Group
Role Fighter/Attack
Part of   Air Force Reserve Command
Garrison/HQ Moody Air Force Base, Georgia
Commanders
Current
commander
James A. Travis[1]
Insignia
476th Fighter Group emblem (approved 18 May 2010)[2]
Tail Code FT
Aircraft flown
Attack A-10 Thunderbolt II

The 476th Fighter Group is an Air Reserve Component (ARC) of the Air Combat Command.

The group was active twice during World War II for brief periods, the first time in China as part of Fourteenth Air Force and the second time in the United States as a training unit.

In the late 1950s the group was activated to open Glasgow Air Force Base, Montana, but the role of Glasgow shifted to the support of Strategic Air Command (SAC)'s nuclear strike force and the group was inactivated in April 1960 and it assets transferred to SAC.

The group was most recently activated as a reserve associate unit in 2009.

Contents

  • Overview 1
  • History 2
    • World War II 2.1
    • Air defense 2.2
    • Air reserve 2.3
  • Lineage 3
    • Assignments 3.1
    • Units assigned 3.2
      • Operational Units 3.2.1
      • Support Units 3.2.2
    • Stations 3.3
    • Aircraft 3.4
  • See also 4
  • References 5
    • Notes 5.1
    • Bibliography 5.2
  • External links 6

Overview

The group is assigned to the 442d Fighter Wing, at Whiteman AFB, Missouri. The 476th Fighter Group is an Air Force Reserve associate unit linked to the 23d Fighter Group at Moody. The 442 oversees the 476th's administrative and mission-support needs not provided by Moody's host, active-duty wing.

The group works under its own command structure but integrates its operations with the 23d Wing's 74th and 75th Fighter Squadrons and 23d Maintenance Group.[3] The group has approximately 115 airmen consisting of traditional reservists, air reserve technicians and civilians. Eventually, the 476th will grow to about 230 traditional reservists and full-timers, including 20 in the 76th Fighter Squadron, 160 in the 476th Maintenance Squadron and 23 in the medical flight. The remaining airmen will serve on the group staff.

The 476 Fighter Group consists of the following units:

  • 76th Fighter Squadron (A/OA-10A, Tail code: FT)
  • 476th Maintenance Squadron
  • 476th Aerospace Medical Flight

History

World War II

The 476th Fighter Group was activated in China on 19 May 1943 and assigned to Fourteenth Air Force, but the group was never made operational and was disbanded two months later.[4]

The group was reconstituted and activated at Richmond Army Air Base, Virginia on 1 December 1943 as a First Air Force replacement training unit.[4] It was assigned the 453d Fighter Squadron, which had been activated ten days earlier,[5] and the newly activated 541st,[6] 542d,[6] and 543d Fighter Squadrons.[7] Replacement training units were oversized units which trained aircrews prior to their deployment to combat theaters.[8]

However, as the 476th was being organized at Richmond, the

  • "442d Fighter Wing units". 442 Fighter Wing. Retrieved 2 January 2014. 

External links

  • Cornett, Lloyd H; Johnson, Mildred W (1980). A Handbook of Aerospace Defense Organization, 1946–1980. Peterson AFB, CO: Office of History, Aerospace Defense Center. 
  • Craven, Wesley F & Cate, James L, ed. (1955). The Army Air Forces in World War II. Vol. VI, Men & Planes. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press.  
  • Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1983) [1961]. Air Force Combat Units of World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History.  
  • Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1982) [1969]. Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History.  

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

Bibliography

  1. ^ "Biography: Col. James A. Travis". Moody AFB. Current as of June 2013. Retrieved 2 January 2014. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Robertson, Patsy (2011-06-15). "Factsheet 476 Fighter Group (AFRC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 2 January 2014. 
  3. ^ "Factsheet The 476th Fighter Group". Moody AFB. 2012-02-02. Retrieved 2 January 2014. 
  4. ^ a b c d Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1983) [1961]. Air Force Combat Units of World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. p. 349.  
  5. ^ a b Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1982) [1969]. Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. p. 559.  
  6. ^ a b c d Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 647
  7. ^ a b Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 648
  8. ^ Craven, Wesley F & Cate, James L, ed. (1955). "Introduction". The Army Air Forces in World War II. Vol. VI, Men & Planes. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. p. xxxvi.  
  9. ^ Craven & Cate, The Organization and its Responsibilities, Chapter 2 The AAF p. 75
  10. ^ Maurer, Combat Units, p. 7
  11. ^ Cornett, Lloyd H; Johnson, Mildred W (1980). A Handbook of Aerospace Defense Organization, 1946–1980. Peterson AFB, CO: Office of History, Aerospace Defense Center. p. 80. 
  12. ^ a b Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 39
  13. ^ "Abstract, History 4141 Strategic Wing Apr-Dec 1960". Air Force History Index. Retrieved January 2, 2014. 
  14. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 406
  15. ^ "Abstract, History 476 USAF Dispensary Jan-Jun 1958". Air Force History Index. Retrieved January 2, 2014. 
  16. ^ "Abstract, History 476 Air Base Squadron Jan-Mar 1961". Air Force History Index. Retrieved January 2, 2014. 
  17. ^ Cornett & Johnson, p. 146

Notes

References

See also

  • McDonnell F-101B Voodoo, 1959-1960
  • Fairchild Republic A-10 Thunderbolt II, 2009–present

Aircraft

  • Kunming Airport, China, 19 May 1943 - 31 July 1943
  • Richmond Army Air Base, Virginia, 1 December 1943
  • Pocatello Army Air Field, Idaho, 26 March 1944 - 1 April 1944
  • Glasgow Air Force Base, Montana, 8 February 1957 - 1 April 1960
  • Moody Air Force Base, Georgia, 1 February 2009 – present[2]

Stations

  • 476th USAF Dispensary,[15] 8 February 1957 - 1 April 1960
  • 476th Air Base Squadron,[16] 8 February 1957 - 1 April 1960
  • 476th Maintenance Squadron, 1 February 2009 – present
  • 476th Materiel Squadron, 8 February 1957 - 1 April 1960[17]
  • 476th Aerospace Medical Flight, 1 February 2009 – present

Support Units

  • 13th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron: 2 July 1959 - 1 April 1960[12]
  • 76th Fighter Squadron: 1 February 2009 – present[2]
  • 453d Fighter Squadron: 1 December 1943 - 1 April 1944[5]
  • 541st Fighter Squadron: 1 December 1943 - 1 April 1944[6]
  • 542d Fighter Squadron: 1 December 1943 - 1 April 1944[6]
  • 543d Fighter Squadron: 1 December 1943 - 1 April 1944[7]

Operational Units

Units assigned

Assignments

Activated on 1 February 2009[2]
  • Redesignated 476th Tactical Fighter Group on 31 July 1985 (Remained inactive)
  • Redesignated 476th Fighter Group on 6 January 2009
Activated on 8 February 1957
Discontinued on 1 April 1960.
  • Reconstituted and redesignated 476th Fighter Group (Air Defense) on 11 December 1956
Activated on 1 December 1943
Disbanded on 1 April 1944.
  • Reconstituted on 11 October 1943
Activated on 19 May 1943
Disbanded on 31 July 1943.
  • Constituted as the 476th Fighter Group on 20 April 1943

Lineage

The group stood up as an Air Force Reserve associate unit equipped with A-10 Thunderbolt IIs linked to the 23d Fighter Group in July 2009.

Air reserve

SAC had organized the 4141st Strategic Wing at Glasgow in the fall of 1958 as a tenant unit.[13] As it became apparent that the SAC mission would be the predominant one at Glasgow, the base was transferred to SAC and the ADC units there became tenants.

[12] The 13th FIS was reassigned directly to the 29th Air Division.[11] (Air Defense) and activated on 8 February 1957 as part of 476th Fighter Group The group was reconstituted again as the

13th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron McDonnell F-101B 57-0336 at Glasgow AFB

Air defense

and its personnel and equipment was used to form the 265th AAF Base Unit (Replacement Training Unit Fighter). [4] in late March 1944, where it was disbandedPocatello Army Air Field Instead, the 476th was moved to [2] As a result, the 476th and its squadrons apparently never became operational at Richmond.[10] while the groups and squadrons acting as RTUs were disbanded or inactivated.[9]

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