World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Abrasion (mechanical)

Article Id: WHEBN0025388263
Reproduction Date:

Title: Abrasion (mechanical)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Tribology, Airlift pump, Sander, Wood lagging, Bowstring
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Abrasion (mechanical)

Abrasion is the process of scuffing, scratching, wearing down, marring, or rubbing away. It can be intentionally imposed in a controlled process using an abrasive. Abrasion can be an undesirable effect of exposure to normal use or exposure to the elements.

Abrasion in stone shaping

Ancient artists working in stone would use abrasion to create sculptures. The artist selected dense stones like carbonite and emory and rub them consistently against comparatively softer stones like limestone or granite. The artist would use different sizes and shapes of abrasives, or turn them in various ways as they rubbed, to create effects on the softer stone's surface. Water would be continuously poured over the surface to carry away particles. Abrasive technique in stone shaping was a long, tedious process that, with patience, resulted in eternal works of art in stone.

Models

The Archard equation is a simple model used to describe sliding wear and is based around the theory of asperity contact.

Abrasion resistance

The resistance of materials and structures to abrasion can be measured by a variety of test methods.[1] These often use a specified abrasive or other controlled means of abrasion. Under the conditions of the test, the results can be reported or can be compared items subjected to similar tests.

Such standardized measurements can produce two quantities: abrasion rate and normalized abrasion rate (also called abrasion resistance index). The former is the amount of mass lost per 1000 cycles of abrasion. The latter is the ratio of former with the known abrasion rate for some specific reference material.[2]

One type of instrument used to get the quantities abrasion rate and normalized abrasion rate, is the abrasion scrub tester. This instrument is made up of a mechanical arm, liquid pump, and programmable electronics. The machine draws the mechanical arm with attached brush (or sandpaper, sponge, etc.) over the surface of the material that is being tested. The operator sets a pre-programmed number of passes for a repeatable and controlled result. The liquid pump can provide detergent or other liquids to the mechanical arm during testing to simulate washing and other normal uses.[3]

The use of proper lubricants can help control abrasion in some instances. Some items can be covered with an abrasion resistant material. Controlling the cause of abrasion is sometimes an option.

Standards

ASTM

  • ASTM B611 Test Method for Abrasive Wear Resistance of Cemented Carbides
  • ASTM C131 Standard Test Method for Resistance to Degradation of Small-Size Coarse Aggregate by Abrasion and Impact in the Los Angeles Machine
  • ASTM C448 Standard Test Methods for Abrasion Resistance of Porcelain Enamels
  • ASTM C535 Standard Test Method for Resistance to Degradation of Large-Size Coarse Aggregate by Abrasion and Impact in the Los Angeles Machine
  • ASTM C944 Standard Test Method for Abrasion Resistance of Concrete or Mortar Surfaces by the Rotating-Cutter Method
  • ASTM C1027 Standard Test Method for Determining Visible Abrasion Resistance of Glazed Ceramic Tile
  • ASTM C1353 Standard Test Method for Abrasion Resistance of Dimension Stone Subjected to Foot Traffic Using a Rotary Platform, Double-Head Abraser
  • ASTM D968 Standard Test Methods for Abrasion Resistance of Organic Coatings by Falling Abrasive
  • ASTM D1630 Standard Test Method for Rubber Property — Abrasion Resistance (Footwear Abrader)
  • ASTM D 2228 Standard Test Method for Rubber Property - Relative Abrasion Resistance by the Pico Abrader Method
  • ASTM D3389 Standard Test Method for Coated Fabrics Abrasion Resistance (Rotary Platform Abrader)
  • ASTM D4060 Standard Test Method for Abrasion Resistance of Organic Coatings by the Taber Abraser
  • ASTM D4158 Standard Guide for Abrasion Resistance of Textile Fabrics
  • ASTM D4966 Standard Test Method for Abrasion Resistance of Textile Fabrics
  • ASTM D5181 Standard Test Method for Abrasion Resistance of Printed Matter by the GA-CAT Comprehensive Abrasion Tester
  • ASTM D5264 Standard Practice for Abrasion Resistance of Printed Materials by the Sutherland Rub Tester
  • ASTM D5963 Standard Test Method for Rubber Property—Abrasion Resistance (Rotary Drum Abrader)
  • ASTM D6279 Standard Test Method for Rub Abrasion Mar Resistance of High Gloss Coatings
  • ASTM D7428 Standard Test Method for Resistance of Fine Aggregate to Degradation by Abrasion in the Micro-Deval Apparatus
  • ASTM F1486 Standard Practice for Determination of Abrasion and Smudge Resistance of Images Produced from Office Products
  • ASTM G56 Standard Test Method for Abrasiveness of Ink-Impregnated Fabric Printer Ribbons and Other Web Materials
  • ASTM G65 Standard Test Method for Measuring Abrasion Using the Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel Apparatus
  • ASTM G75 Standard Test Method for Determination of Slurry Abrasivity (Miller Number) and Slurry Abrasion Response of Materials (SAR Number)
  • ASTM G81 Standard Test Method for Jaw Crusher Gouging Abrasion Test
  • ASTM G105 Standard Test Method for Conducting Wet Sand/Rubber Wheel Abrasion Tests
  • ASTM G132 Standard Test Method for Pin Abrasion Testing
  • ASTM G171 Standard Test Method for Scratch Hardness of Materials Using a Diamond Stylus
  • ASTM G174 Standard Test Method for Measuring Abrasion Resistance of Materials by Abrasive Loop Contact

DIN

  • DIN 53516 Testing of Rubber and Elastomers; Determination of Abrasion Resistance

ISO

  • ISO 4649 Rubber, vulcanized or thermoplastic -- Determination of abrasion resistance using a rotating cylindrical drum device
  • ISO 9352 Plastics -- Determination of resistance to wear by abrasive wheels
  • ISO 28080 Hardmetals -- Abrasion tests for hardmetals
  • ISO 23794 Rubber, vulcanized or thermoplastic -- Abrasion testing -- Guidance
  • ISO 21988:2006 Abrasion-resistant cast irons. Classification
  • ISO 28080:2011 Hardmetals. Abrasion tests for hardmetals
  • ISO 16282:2008 Methods of test for dense shaped refractory products. Determination of resistance to abrasion at ambient temperature

JSA

  • JIS A 1121 Method of test for resistance to abrasion of coarse aggregate by use of the Los Angeles machine
  • JIS A 1452 Method of abrasion test for building materials and part of building construction (falling sand method)
  • JIS A 1453 Method of abrasion test for building materials and part of building construction (abrasive-paper method)
  • JIS A 1509-5 Test methods for ceramic tiles -- Part 5: Determination of resistance to deep abrasion for unglazed floor tiles
  • JIS A 1509-6 Test methods for ceramic tiles -- Part 6: Determination of resistance to surface abrasion for glazed floor tiles
  • JIS C 60068-2 Environmental testing -- Part 2: Tests -- Test Xb: Abrasion of markings and letterings caused by rubbing of fingers and hands
  • JIS H 8682-1 Test methods for abrasion resistance of anodic oxide coatings on aluminium and aluminium alloys -- Part 1: Wheel wear test
  • JIS H 8682-2 Test methods for abrasion resistance of anodic oxide coatings on aluminium and aluminium alloys -- Part 2: Abrasive jet test
  • JIS H 8682-3 Test methods for abrasion resistance of anodic oxide coatings on aluminium and aluminium alloys -- Part 3: Sand-falling abrasion resistance test
  • JIS K 5600-5-8 Testing methods for paints -- Part 5: Mechanical property of film -- Section 8: Abrasion resistance (Rotating abrasive-paper-covered wheel method)
  • JIS K 7204 Plastics -- Determination of resistance to wear by abrasive wheels

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.ardl.com/Public/Services/Physical/abrasionPOP.html
  2. ^ S. Grynko, "Material Properties Explained" (2012), ISBN 1-4700-7991-7, p. 2.
  3. ^ https://www.byk.com/en/instruments/products/dry-coatings/abrasion-testers.html

Further reading

  • “Wear Processes in Manufacturing”, Badahur and Magee, ASTM STP 1362, 1999
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.