World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Advanced Technology Program

Article Id: WHEBN0017349250
Reproduction Date:

Title: Advanced Technology Program  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: National Institute of Standards and Technology
Collection: National Institute of Standards and Technology
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Advanced Technology Program

The NIST Advanced Technology Program (ATP, or NIST ATP) is a United States government (U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology) program designed to stimulate early-stage advanced technology development that would otherwise not be funded.[1]

ATP is designed for early-stage research in industry, not academia, though it supported academia indirectly (as subcontractors or collaborators in projects). It was started under the administration of U.S. President

  • ATP homepage
  • TIP homepage

External links

  1. ^
  2. ^ [CITE: 15CFR295.1] TITLE 15--COMMERCE AND FOREIGN TRADE CHAPTER II--NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE PART 295--ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM
  3. ^
  4. ^

References

  • P.L.110-69, Sec. 3012 Technology Innovation Program, legislation authorizing the Technology Innovation Program

Bibliography

  • TIP makes cost-shared awards of no more than 50 percent of total project costs to high-risk R&D projects that address critical national and societal needs in NIST’s areas of technical competence.
  • Projects may be proposed either by individual, for-profit companies or by joint ventures that may include for-profit companies, institutions of higher learning, national laboratories or non-profit research institutes, so long as the lead partner is either a small or medium-sized business or an institution of higher learning.
  • Awards are limited to no more than $3 million total over three years for a single-company project or no more than $9 million total over five years for a joint venture.
  • TIP may not provide funding to any business that is not a small- or medium-sized business, though those businesses may participate in a TIP-funded project.

The major features of the Technology Innovation Program are established in the authorizing legislation. These include:

Features

TIP is aimed at speeding the development of new research targeted to address specific national problems.[4] Funding is provided to industry (small and medium-sized businesses), universities, and consortia for research on new technologies for solving critical national problems that present high technical risks, with commensurate high rewards if successful. The primary mechanism for this support are cost-shared research grants, cooperative agreements, or contracts awarded on the basis of merit competitions.

A new, successor program was enacted called the NIST Technology Innovation Program. The Technology Innovation Program (TIP) was established for the purpose of assisting U.S. businesses and institutions of higher education or other organizations, such as national laboratories and nonprofit research institutes, to support, promote, and accelerate innovation in the United States through high-risk, high-reward research in areas of critical national need.

Technology Innovation Program

Contents

  • Technology Innovation Program 1
    • Features 1.1
  • Bibliography 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

(H.R. 2272; Public Law Number 110-69), which repealed the Advanced Technology Program-enabling legislation. America COMPETES Act working with the Administration and Congress to terminate this program. This was completed on August 9, 2007, when the president signed the White House and the program was suspended in 2005 with the [3]

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.