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America's Best Dance Crew

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America's Best Dance Crew

America's Best Dance Crew
Season 1-7 logo
Also known as Randy Jackson Presents America's Best Dance Crew
Genre Competitive dance
Interactive
Reality
Created by Howard Schwartz
Karen Schwartz
Directed by Michael Simon
Ryan Polito (season 8)
Presented by Mario Lopez (season 1-7)
Layla Kayleigh (season 1-7)
Jason Dundas (season 8)
Judges JC Chasez (season 1-7)
Lil Mama (season 1-7)
Shane Sparks (season 1-4)
Omarion (season 5)
D-Trix (season 6-7)
T-Pain (season 8)
Teyana Taylor (season 8)
Frankie Grande (season 8)
Composer(s) Dylan R. Berry
Noah Lifschey
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 8
Production
Executive producer(s) Randy Jackson
Joel Gallen
Josh Greenberg
Abe Hoch
Randy Jackson
Rob Lee
Howard Schwartz
Karen Schwartz
Harriet Sternberg
Austin Wagner
Jane Y. Mun
Joe Gallon
Producer(s) Tom Park
Location(s) Warner Bros. Studios, Burbank, California
Cinematography Scott Hylton
Running time 60-90 minutes
Production company(s) Warner Horizon Television
Distributor MTV
Release
Original channel MTV
Original release Original series:
February 7, 2008 (2008-02-07)[1]
–June 13, 2012 (2012-06-13)
Revived series:
July 29, 2015 (2015-07-29) –
present
External links
Website

America's Best Dance Crew, often abbreviated as ABDC, is an American competitive dance reality television series that features both national and international dance crews. The show was produced by singer, record producer, and former American Idol judge Randy Jackson.[2] The series premiered on February 7, 2008, on MTV. It was originally developed for NBC as World Moves.[3]

The show was hosted by actor Mario Lopez, and featured television personality Layla Kayleigh as the backstage correspondent. The judging panel consisted of hip hop recording artist Lil Mama, singer-songwriter JC Chasez, and dancer Dominic "D-Trix" Sandoval.[4] Former judges included hip hop choreographer Shane Sparks and R&B singer Omarion.[5][6][7]

After an initial seven season run, America's Best Dance Crew was cancelled in 2012 due to declining ratings.[8] However, on January 10, 2015, MTV announced that the series would be revived for an eighth season.[9]

The new season, titled America’s Best Dance Crew All-Stars: Road to the VMAs, premiered on July 29, 2015.[9] Hosted by Jason Dundas, the revival features a new judging panel: hip hop artist T-Pain, recording artist Teyana Taylor, and Broadway performer Frankie Grande.[10]

Overview

America's Best Dance Crew is a competitive reality show where dance crews showcase their talent and compete for a $100,000 (USD) grand prize and the golden ABDC trophy (a figure of a b-boy doing a freeze, with its legs moving like a bobblehead). Each week, the crews are given a challenge. The challenges are different for each crew, but have the same general concept or share a specific theme. To begin each episode, host Mario Lopez reveals, in no particular order, which crews are safe and which crews are at risk for elimination. After the crews in the bottom perform their routines, the judges decide which crew will advance to the next round.

Another unique aspect of ABDC is the crew banner. Each banner's logo represents its respective crew, appearing during interviews, performances, and on various merchandise. It is also used as a transition effect. When a crew is eliminated, their banner falls from the top of the stadium, where the banners of the crews still in the running stand. The contestants are allowed to dance one final time on the stage as they "walk it out" to the song of the same name.

Season summary

Season Winner Original airdate Judges
Season premiere Season finale
1 JabbaWockeeZ February 7, 2008 March 27, 2008 JC Chasez
Lil Mama
Shane Sparks
2 Super CR3W June 19, 2008 August 21, 2008
3 Quest Crew January 15, 2009 March 5, 2009
4 We Are Heroes August 9, 2009 September 27, 2009
5 Poreotix January 28, 2010 April 8, 2010 JC Chasez
Lil Mama
Omarion
6 I.aM.mE April 7, 2011 June 5, 2011 JC Chasez
Lil Mama
D-Trix
7 Elektrolytes April 11, 2012 June 13, 2012
8 Quest Crew July 29, 2015 August 29, 2015 T-Pain
Teyana Taylor
Frankie Grande

Controversy

MTV and Randy Jackson were sued by entertainer and activist Dwight McGhee, publicly known as rapper Citizen Charlie Kane, in 2010. Kane had pitched the show concept to MTV in 2004 and MTV "passed" on the concept. When Charlie Kane saw a commercial that depicted the 1970s Warriors' movie that looked exactly like his pitch demo DVD, he filed the suit. Many production elements between the show and Kane's 2003 copyright registration of a "break-dancing league" were identical. TMZ and NYPost were a couple among the many major media organizations to run the story. Viacom/MTV and Charlie Kane came to a mutual settlement in 2011.[11][12]

International distribution

ABDC airs on the MTV channel for the Caribbean, Spain, Italy, Portugal, Argentina, Russia (by the alias of "Короли Танцпола", lit. "Kings of the Dancefloor"),[13] Finland, Hungary, Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom, Germany, Ukraine (by the alias of "Танцювальні бої", lit. "Dance Battles"),[14] and Romania.

In Canada, the show airs on both MuchMusic and Musique Plus(the episodes on MP are 2 years late) and in Latin America, the show airs on Warner Channel and now airs on Boomerang. The show also airs on AB1 and MTV France, where it is called Dance Crew USA in France,[15] Solar TV, Jack TV, and The Game Channel in the Philippines, Fiji One in Fiji, and YAN TV in Vietnam.

Additional Notes

  • The opening title sequence created by Framework Studio won a Telly Award in 2009.[16]

References

  1. ^ The Live Auditions Special (aired on January 26, 2008) was not the official season premiere of America's Best Dance Crew.
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External links

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