World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Association of American Publishers

 

Association of American Publishers

The Association of American Publishers (AAP) is the national trade association of the American book publishing industry. AAP has more than 300 members, including most of the major commercial publishers in the United States, as well as smaller and non-profit publishers, university presses and scholarly societies. Former U.S. congresswoman Patricia Schroeder served as the association's CEO from 1997 until 2009. On May 1, 2009 former U.S. congressman Tom Allen took over as president and CEO.

Contents

  • Activities 1
  • Controversy 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Activities

AAP members publish hardcover and paperback books in every field, educational materials for the elementary, secondary, postsecondary, and professional markets, scholarly journals, computer software, and electronic products and services.

The association's core programs deal with intellectual property; new technology and digital issues of concern to publishers; the freedom to read, censorship and libel; the freedom to publish; funding for education and libraries; postal rates and regulations; tax and trade policy; and international copyright enforcement.

Controversy

AAP was criticized after it contracted Eric Dezenhall's crisis management firm to promote its position regarding the open access movement.[1][2] Schroeder told the Washington Post the association hired Dezenhall when members realized they needed help. "We thought we were angels for a long time and we didn't need PR firms."[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Giles, Jim (2007-01-25). "PR's 'pit bull' takes on open access. Journal publishers lock horns with free-information movement.". news @ nature.com. Nature Publishing Group. Archived from the original on 27 January 2007. Retrieved 2007-01-30. 
  2. ^ David Biello (26 January 2007). "Open Access to Science Under Attack".  
  3. ^ Rick Weiss, Publishing Group Hires 'Pit Bull of PR' , Washington Post. January 25, 2007

External links

  • AAP website
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.