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Bespoke

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Bespoke

Bespoke is an adjective for anything commissioned to a particular specification. It may be altered or tailored to the customs, tastes, or usage of an individual purchaser.


Related terms

Origin

The word bespoke is derived from the verb to bespeak, meaning to "speak for something". The particular meaning of the verb form is first cited from 1583 and given in the Oxford English Dictionary: "to speak for, to arrange for, engage beforehand: to ‘order’ (goods)”. The adjective "bespoken" means “ordered, commissioned, arranged for” and is first cited from 1607.[1][2]

The term is generally more prevalent in British English; for example, StyleRocks "bespoke jewellery".[3] American English tends to use the word "custom" instead, as in custom car, custom motorcycle, etc. Nevertheless, "bespoke" has seen increased usage in American English during the 21st century,[4] particularly in the phrase "bespoke suit."[5]

Specific uses

Some common specific uses include:

  • Bespoke medicine, a movement to better fit treatment to the individual patient
  • Bespoke shoes, shoes that are made to fit the customer's specifications
  • Bespoke software, software written to the specific requirement of a customer
  • Bespoke tailoring, men's clothing made to the individual measurements of the customer

References

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See also

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