World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Black bittern

Black bittern
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Pelecaniformes
Family: Ardeidae
Genus: Ixobrychus
Species: I. flavicollis
Binomial name
Ixobrychus flavicollis
(Latham, 1790)
Synonyms

Dupetor flavicollis

The black bittern (Ixobrychus flavicollis) is a bittern of Old World origin, breeding in tropical Asia from Bangladesh, Pakistan, India, and Sri Lanka east to China, Indonesia, and Australia. It is mainly resident, but some northern birds migrate short distances.

In flight in Kolkata, West Bengal, India

This is a fairly large species at 58 cm (23 in) in length, being by some margin the largest bittern in the Ixobrychus genus. Compared to related species, it has a longish neck and long yellow bill. The adult is uniformly black above, with yellow neck sides. It is whitish below, heavily streaked with brown. The juvenile is like the adult, but dark brown rather than black.

Their breeding habitat is reed beds. They nest on platforms of reeds in shrubs, or sometimes in trees. Three to five eggs are laid. They can be difficult to see, given their skulking lifestyle and reed bed habitat, but tend to fly fairly frequently when the all black upperparts makes them unmistakable.

Black bitterns feed on insects, fish, and amphibians.

Contents

  • Conservation status 1
    • Australia 1.1
    • State of Victoria, Australia 1.2
  • Gallery 2
  • References 3

Conservation status

Australia

Black bitterns are not listed as threatened on the Australian Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

State of Victoria, Australia

  • The black bittern is listed as threatened on the Victorian Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act (1988).[2] Under this act, an Action Statement for the recovery and future management of this species has not yet been prepared.[3]
  • On the 2007 advisory list of threatened vertebrate fauna in Victoria, the black bittern is listed as vulnerable.[4]

Gallery

References

  1. ^  
  2. ^ Department of Sustainability and Environment, Victoria
  3. ^ Department of Sustainability and Environment, Victoria
  4. ^ Victorian Department of Sustainability and Environment (2007). Advisory List of Threatened Vertebrate Fauna in Victoria - 2007. East Melbourne, Victoria: Department of Sustainability and Environment. p. 15.  
  • Birds of India by Grimmett, Inskipp and Inskipp, ISBN 0-691-04910-6
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.