World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Bobby Shantz

Article Id: WHEBN0000876710
Reproduction Date:

Title: Bobby Shantz  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Jim Kaat, Mike Boddicker, Lefty Grove, Johan Santana, Jim Palmer
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Bobby Shantz

Bobby Shantz
Pitcher
Born: (1925-09-26) September 26, 1925
Pottstown, Pennsylvania
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
May 1, 1949 for the Philadelphia Athletics
Last MLB appearance
September 29, 1964 for the Philadelphia Phillies
Career statistics
Win–Loss record 119–99
Earned run average 3.38
Strikeouts 1,072
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Robert Clayton Shantz (born September 26, 1925) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics (1949–1954), Kansas City Athletics (1955–1956), New York Yankees (1957–1960), Pittsburgh Pirates (1961), Houston Colt .45's (1962), St. Louis Cardinals (1962–1964), Chicago Cubs (1964), and the Philadelphia Phillies (1964).[1]

A left-hander, Shantz began his career as a starting pitcher, but about halfway through he converted to a competent relief pitcher. In 1951 he added the knuckleball to his repertoire. Standing only 5'6", Shantz had a career record of 119 games won, 99 games lost, and an ERA of 3.38.

Contents

  • Career 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Career

Shantz enjoyed his best season in 1952 when he led the American League in wins (24) and won the MVP Award.[1] In the process, however, he led the A's to a fourth place finish. This was their last winning season in Philadelphia. The 1952 A's had some excellent players, including batting champion Ferris Fain, shortstop Eddie Joost, home run hitter Gus Zernial, and fleet center fielder Dave Philley. In a September 1952 game, Shantz's left wrist was broken after it was hit by a pitch thrown by Walt Masterson.[2] The following season, Shantz injured his shoulder in a game against the Boston Red Sox.[3] Shantz saw only limited action for the rest of 1953 and pitched only eight innings in 1954.[4] After the 1954 season was complete the Philadelphia Athletics were sold and moved to Kansas City for the 1955 season.

A highly skilled fielder, Shantz won eight consecutive Gold Glove Awards from 1957 to 1964 (American League, 1957–60; National League, 1961–64; in 1957 the award was rendered for both leagues). Shantz also was selected for the All-Star Game in 1951, 1952 and 1957.[1] In the fifth and final inning of the 1952 All Star Game, the left–handed Shantz exhibited his distinctive sidearm delivery and sharp curve and control and struck out three highly respected National League hitters in a row: Whitey Lockman, Jackie Robinson, and Stan Musial.

Shantz appeared in relief three games each in the 1957 and 1960 World Series with the Casey Stengel managed New York Yankees.[1]

Shantz had the distinction of being selected in expansion drafts in consecutive seasons. He was selected in the 1960 MLB expansion draft by the Washington Senators from the New York Yankees, and in the 1961 MLB expansion draft by the Colt .45s from the Pittsburgh Pirates.

He is the brother of former Major League catcher Billy Shantz.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d Career statistics and history at Baseball-Reference.com.
  2. ^ Shantz suffers broken wrist as A's nip Nats
  3. ^ Bobby Shantz is sidelined with injured shoulder
  4. ^ Bobby Shantz apparently has made it all the way backPu

External links

  • Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.