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Boston city council election, 2011

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Boston city council election, 2011

Boston city council elections were held on November 8, 2011 with preliminary elections on September 27, 2011. All 13 seats (9 district representatives and 4 at-large members) were contested. The special election to fill the vacancy for District 7 took place on March 15, 2011 with the preliminary election on February 15, 2011

At-Large

John R. Connolly, Stephen J. Murphy, Felix G. Arroyo, and Ayanna Pressley won the four At-Large seats.

Pressley's victory made her first woman of color to be reelected to the council in its history. Also after this election she became the only female member of the council.[1]

Candidates General Election[2]
Votes %
Ayanna Pressley 37,532 21.42%
Felix G. Arroyo 35,483 20.25%
John R. Connolly 32,827 18.74%
Stephen J. Murphy 26,730 15.26%
Michael F. Flaherty 25,805 14.73%
Will Dorcena 8,739 4.99%
Sean H. Ryan 7,376 4.21%

District 1

Councilor Salvatore LaMattina ran unopposed.[3]

District 2

Councilor Bill Linehan was re-elected.

Candidates Preliminary election[4] General election[5]
Votes % Votes %
Bill Linehan 2,334 35.02% 5,078 50.28%
Suzanne Lee 2,608 39.14% 4,981 49.32%
Bob Ferrara 1689 25.35%

District 3

Councilor Maureen Feeney decided to retire after 18 years on the Boston city council to take the job of city clerk.[6] Frank Baker was elected.

Candidates Preliminary Election[7] General Election[8]
Votes % Votes %
Frank Baker 2,338 31.53% 5,262 55.78%
John O'Toole 1,916 25.84% 4,120 43.68%
Craig Galvin 1,769 23.86%
Doug Bennett 703 9.48%
Marydith Tuitt 334 4.50%
Stephanie Everett 266 3.59%
Martin Hogan 63 0.85%

District 4

Councilor Charles Yancey was re-elected.

Candidates General Election[9]
Votes %
Charles Yancey 3,893 88.54%
J.R. Rucker 435 9.89%

District 5

Councilor Robert Consalvo ran unopposed.[10]

District 6

Councilor Matt O'Malley ran unopposed.[11]

District 7

Special Election

On December 1, 2010, Councilor Chuck Turner was expelled from the Boston City Council by an 11-1 vote making him the first council member to ever be expelled in the history of the modern Boston City Council.[12] Creating a vacancy which needed to be filled by a special election The special election it took place on March 15, 2011 with the preliminary election on February 15, 2011.

Candidates Special Prelim. Election[13] Special Gen. Election[14]
Votes % Votes %
Tito Jackson 1,944 67.38% 2,829 81.98%
Cornell Mills 271 9.39% 557 16.14%
Daneille Renee Williams 258 8.94%
Althea Garrison 150 5.20%
Natalie Carithers 96 3.33%
Roy Owens 89 3.08%

Municipal Election

Councilor Tito Jackson was elected to a full term.

Candidates Preliminary Election[15] General Election[16]
Votes % Votes %
Tito Jackson 1,876 76.07% 4,818 84.35%
Sheneal Parker 273 11.07% 799 13.99%
Althea Garrison 216 8.76%
Roy Owens 85 3.45%

District 8

Councilor Michael P. Ross ran unopposed.[17]

District 9

Councilor Mark Ciommo ran unopposed.[18]

References

  1. ^ http://www.cityofboston.gov/citycouncil/councillors/pressley.asp Retrieved 2010-03-29
  2. ^ "Municipal Election - City Councillor At Large". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  3. ^ "Municipal Election - City Councillor District 1". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  4. ^ "Preliminary Municipal Election - City Councillor District 2". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  5. ^ "Municipal Election - City Councillor District 2". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  6. ^ http://www.boston.com/news/politics/articles/2011/11/15/maureen_e_feeney_resigns_quietly_from_boston_city_council_perhaps_to_become_city_clerk/
  7. ^ "Preliminary Municipal Election - City Councillor District 3". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  8. ^ "Municipal Election - City Councillor District 3". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  9. ^ "Municipal Election - City Councillor District 4". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  10. ^ "Municipal Election - City Councillor District 5". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  11. ^ "Municipal Election - City Councillor District 6". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  12. ^ http://www.boston.com/news/local/breaking_news/2010/12/turners_city_co.html
  13. ^ "Preliminary Municipal Election - City Councillor District 7". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  14. ^ "Municipal Election - City Councillor District 7". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  15. ^ "Preliminary Municipal Election - City Councillor District 7". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  16. ^ "Municipal Election - City Councillor District 7". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  17. ^ "Municipal Election - City Councillor District 8". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
  18. ^ "Municipal Election - City Councillor District 9". City of Boston.gov. City of Boston. Retrieved 10 November 2012. 
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