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Brock for Broglio

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Title: Brock for Broglio  
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Subject: St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs, Cardinals–Cubs rivalry, History of the St. Louis Cardinals (1953–89), 1886 World Series
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Brock for Broglio

The phrase "Brock for Broglio" is sometimes used in the sport of baseball to signify a trade that in hindsight, turns out to be an extremely lopsided transaction.[1]

The names in the phrase refer to Lou Brock and Ernie Broglio respectively, the centerpieces of a June 15, 1964, six-player deal: Brock, Jack Spring and Paul Toth were traded from the Chicago Cubs to the St. Louis Cardinals in exchange for Broglio, Bobby Shantz, and Doug Clemens.[1]

It was thought initially the Cubs had done better in the deal, as Broglio was coming off some impressive seasons while pitching for the Cardinals, while Brock had been considered a disappointment for the Cubs.[1]

Almost immediately the effects of the trade were felt, as Brock batted .348 for the Cardinals and led them to winning the 1964 World Series. Brock also helped the Cardinals to another World Series title in 1967, a pennant in 1968, and played successfully for St. Louis through 1979, amassing 3,023 hits and 938 stolen bases (at the time becoming baseball's all-time leader in stolen bases) en route to his Hall of Fame election in 1985. Meanwhile, Broglio went only 4-7 with a 4.04 ERA for the Cubs, and by 1966 was out of Major League Baseball. Broglio did not tell anyone at the time, but he was suffering from an injured elbow since the second-half of the 1963 season, and in November 1964, had his ulnar nerve reset.[1]

This is sometimes referred to as the most lopsided trade in baseball history.[2][3]

References

  1. ^ a b c d "It was 50 years ago today Cards got Brock from Cubs".  
  2. ^ Page 2 staff. "Worst baseball deadline trades". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2009-09-19. 
  3. ^ Gold, Eddie (August 1996). These Were the Ten Most Lopsided Player Trades. Baseball Digest (Books.Google.com). Retrieved 19 April 2011. 
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