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CSS Baltic

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Title: CSS Baltic  
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CSS Baltic

CSS Baltic
Engraving published in The Soldier in Our Civil War, Volume II, depicting the ironclad ram CSS Baltic at Mobile, Alabama
History
Name: Baltic
Launched: 1860
Commissioned: 1862
Decommissioned: July 1864
Captured: 10 May 1865
Fate: Sold for scrap, 31 December 1865
General characteristics
Displacement: 624 tons
Length: 186 ft (57 m)
Beam: 38 ft (12 m)
Draft: 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Propulsion: Steam engine
Speed: 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph)
Complement: 86 officers and men
Armament: 2 × Dahlgren guns, 2 × 32-pounders, 2 × smaller pieces

CSS Baltic was an iron and cottonclad sidewheeler ship built in 1860 in Philadelphia as a river tow boat belonging to the Southern Steamship Co. She was purchased by the State of Alabama, converted to an armored ram, and turned over to the Confederate States Navy in the middle of 1862. Her first commanding officer was Lieutenant James D. Johnston.

Throughout the American Civil War, the Baltic operated in the Mobile Bay, Mobile, Alabama and Tombigbee Rivers. The Baltic was reported unfit for service in February 1863, with her deteriorating condition preventing her from joining the defense of Mobile Bay in June 1864. She was dismantled in July 1864 and her armor transferred to CSS Nashville.

The Baltic was captured at Nanna Hubba Bluff, Tombigbee River, Alabama, on 10 May 1865 and sold on 31 December 1865.

References

This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. The entry can be found here.

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