World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Carbinoxamine

Article Id: WHEBN0005497779
Reproduction Date:

Title: Carbinoxamine  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Antihistamine, H1 antagonist, Mebhydrolin, ATC code R06, Dexchlorpheniramine
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Carbinoxamine

Carbinoxamine
Systematic (IUPAC) name
2-[(4-Chlorophenyl)-pyridin-2-yl-methoxy]-N,N-
dimethyl-ethanamine
Clinical data
AHFS/Drugs.com
MedlinePlus
Pregnancy
category
  • C
Legal status
  • 4 mg is FDA approved
Routes of
administration
Oral: 4 mg tablet or 4 mg/5 mL liquid
Pharmacokinetic data
Biological half-life 10 to 20 hours
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number  Y
ATC code R06
PubChem CID:
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank  Y
ChemSpider  Y
UNII  Y
KEGG  Y
ChEBI  Y
ChEMBL  Y
Chemical data
Formula C16H19ClN2O
Molecular mass 290.788 g/mol
 Y   

Carbinoxamine (Clistin, Palgic, Rondec, Rhinopront) is a antihistamine and anticholinergic agent. It was first launched in the United States by the McNeil Corporation under the brand name Clistin. It is now available under the brand name Palgic as 4 mg tablets or 4 mg/5 mL liquid. It is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (specifically at the 4 mg dose/strength) for hay fever (a.k.a. allergic rhinitis, SAR and PAR); vasomotor rhinitis; mild urticaria; angioedema, dermatographism and allergic conjunctivitis. Carbinoxamine is a histamine antagonist, specifically an H1-antagonist. The maleic acid acid salt of the levorotatory isomer is sold as the prescription drug rotoxamine.

Carbinoxamine is available in various countries around the world by itself, combined with decongestants such as pseudoephedrine, and also with other ingredients including paracetamol, aspirin, and codeine.

In June 2006 the FDA announced that more than 120 branded pharmacy products containing carbinoxamine were being illegally marketed and demanded they be removed from the marketplace. This action was precipitated by twenty-one reported deaths in children under the age of two who had been administered carbinoxamine-containing products. Despite the fact that the drug had not been studied in this age group, a multitude of OTC preparations containing carbinoxamine were being marketed for infants and toddlers. At present, all carbinoxamine-containing formulations are approved only for adults or children ages 3 or older.[1]

Carbinoxamine is used in the treatment of severe itching in patients with CD5.

See also

References

  1. ^ [2]


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.