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Demographics of Honduras

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Demographics of Honduras

A village in Copán.
Talanga road, Honduras.

This article is about the ethnic groups and population of Honduras.

Population

According to the 2012 revision of the World Population Prospects the total population was 7,621,000 in 2010, compared to only 1,487,000 in 1950 (a fivefold increase in 60 years). The proportion of children below the age of 15 in 2010 was 36.8%, 58.9% was between 15 and 65 years of age, while 4.3% was 65 years or older.[2] According to the CIA World Factbook, 60% of Hondurans live below the poverty line.[3] And more than 30% of the population is divided between the lower middle and upper middle class, less than 10% are wealthy or belong to the higher social class (most live in Tegucigalpa and San Pedro Sula).

Total population
(x 1000)
Proportion
aged 0–14
(%)
Proportion
aged 15–64
(%)
Proportion
aged 65+
(%)
1950 1 487 42.2 53.8 4.0
1955 1 717 44.3 52.3 3.4
1960 2 002 46.1 50.8 3.2
1965 2 353 47.1 49.8 3.1
1970 2 691 47.7 49.2 3.1
1975 3 108 47.5 49.3 3.2
1980 3 636 47.0 49.8 3.2
1985 4 238 46.2 50.6 3.2
1990 4 904 45.5 51.1 3.4
1995 5 592 44.3 52.1 3.6
2000 6 236 42.4 53.7 3.9
2005 6 899 39.8 56.0 4.1
2010 7 621 36.8 58.9 4.3

Vital statistics

Registration of vital events is in Honduras not complete. The Population Department of the United Nations prepared the following estimates.

[2]
Period Live births
per year
Deaths
per year
Natural change
per year
CBR* CDR* NC* TFR* IMR* Life expectancy
total
Life expectancy
males
Life expectancy
females
1950-1955 84 000 40 000 44 000 52.1 24.7 27.4 7.50 169 41.8 40.5 43.1
1955-1960 95 000 40 000 55 000 51.1 21.5 29.6 7.50 154 44.6 43.0 46.3
1960-1965 108 000 40 000 68 000 49.5 18.3 31.2 7.42 136 48.0 46.3 49.8
1965-1970 122 000 40 000 82 000 48.4 16.0 32.4 7.42 119 51.0 49.2 53.0
1970-1975 133 000 40 000 93 000 45.9 13.7 32.2 7.05 104 54.1 52.1 56.2
1975-1980 150 000 38 000 112 000 44.5 11.4 33.1 6.60 81 57.7 55.6 59.9
1980-1985 166 000 36 000 130 000 42.3 9.2 33.1 6.00 65 61.6 59.4 63.8
1985-1990 180 000 33 000 147 000 39.5 7.3 32.2 5.37 53 65.4 63.2 67.7
1990-1995 195 000 33 000 162 000 37.1 6.3 30.8 4.92 43 67.7 65.4 70.1
1995-2000 198 000 33 000 165 000 33.4 5.6 27.9 4.30 35 69.8 67.5 72.3
2000-2005 197 000 35 000 163 000 30.0 5.3 24.8 3.72 31 71.0 68.6 73.4
2005-2010 201 000 37 000 164 000 27.7 5.1 22.7 3.31 28 72.1 69.7 74.5
* CBR = crude birth rate (per 1000); CDR = crude death rate (per 1000); NC = natural change (per 1000); IMR = infant mortality rate per 1000 births; TFR = total fertility rate (number of children per woman)

Fertility and Births

Total Fertility Rate (TFR) and Crude Birth Rate (CBR):[4]

Year CBR (Total) TFR (Total) CBR (Urban) TFR (Urban) CBR (Rural) TFR (Rural)
1998-2001 4,4
2003-2006 27 3,3 24 2,6 29 4,1
2006-2009 27 3,3
2009-2012 25,6 2,9 24,2 2,5 27,2 3,5

Ethnic groups

Mestizos, (European mixed with Amerindian) make up more than 90% of the population of Honduras. Amerindians are 6% of the population and AfroHondurans comprise 1%. As in other Latin American countries, the question of racial breakdown of a national population is contentious. Since the beginning of the 20th century at least, Honduras has publicly framed itself as a mestizo nation, ignoring and at times disparaging both the African component of the population and often also the surviving indigenous population that was still regarded as pure blood.[5][6]

Because of social stigmas attached, many people denied having African ancestry, and after African descended Caribbean workers arrived in Honduras, an active campaign to denigrate all people of African descent, made persons of mixed race anxious to deny any African ancestry. Hence official statistics quite uniformly under-represent those people who have ancestry in favor of a "two race" solution.[5]

Amerindian

According to the 2001 census the [7] With the exception of the Lenca and the Ch'orti' they still keep their language.

Six different Amerindian groups were counted at the 2001 census:

  • the Lenca (279,507 in 2001;4.6% of the total population) living in the La Paz, Intibucá, and Lempira departments;
  • the Miskito (51,607 in 2001; 0.8%) living on the northeast coast along the border with Nicaragua.
  • the Ch'orti' (34,453 in 2001;0.6% of the total population), a Mayan group living in the northwest on the border with Guatemala;
  • the Tolupan (also called Jicaque, "Xicaque", or Tol; 9,617 in 2001; 0.2% of the total population), living in the reserve of the Montaña de la Flor and parts of the department of Yoro;
  • the Pech or Paya Indians (3,848 in 2001; 0.1% of the total population) living in a small area in the Olancho department;
  • the Sumo or Tawahka (2,463 in 2001; <0.1%)

Afro-Honduran

The Afro-Honduran population consists of Garifuna and Creoles.

  • The Garifuna are descendants of [7] The Garifuna speak an Arawakan language. They live along the entire Caribbean coastline of Honduras, and in the Bay Islands.
  • The number of Creoles was 12,370 (0.2%) in 2001.

Other ethnicities

Honduras hosts a significant Palestinian community (the vast majority of whom are Christian Arabs).[8] These Arab-Hondurans are sometimes called "Turcos", because they arrived in Honduras using Turkish travel documents, as their homeland was then under the control of the Ottoman Empire. The Palestinians arrived in the country in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, establishing themselves especially in the city of San Pedro Sula.[9]

There is also a small Chinese community in Honduras. A lawyer of the Committee for the Defense of Human Rights in Honduras (CODEH) stated that the Chinese community in Honduras is rather small. Many of the Chinese are immigrants who arrived from China after the revolution and their descendants.[10]

See also

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ a b Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat, World Population Prospects: The 2012 Revision
  3. ^ "CIA - The World Factbook". Cia.gov. Retrieved 2014-11-02. 
  4. ^ http://microdata.worldbank.org/catalog/dhs#_r=&collection=&country=&dtype=&from=1890&page=7&ps=&sk=&sort_by=nation&sort_order=&to=2014&topic=&view=s&vk=
  5. ^ a b Dario Euraque, "The Threat of Blackness to the Mestizo Nation: Race and Ethnicity in the Honduran Banana Economy, 1920s and 1930s," in Steve Striffler and Mark Moberg, eds. Banana Wars: Power, Production and History in the Americas (Duke University Press, 2003), pp. 229-49.
  6. ^ Dario Euraque, "Antropólogos, archaeólogos, imperialismo y la mayanicación de Honduras, 1890-1940," Revista Historia 45 (2002): 73-103
  7. ^ a b [2]
  8. ^ The Arabs of Honduras. Larry Luxner. Saudi Aramco World.
  9. ^ [3]
  10. ^ [4]. The UN Refugee Agency. "Honduras: Information on racism and treatment of ethnic Chinese."
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