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Dentists

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Dentists

This article is about the dental profession. For tooth care, see oral hygiene and dental surgery.
Dentist
Description
Competencies critical thinking, analytical skills, professionalism, management skills, and communication
Education required Doctor of Dental Medicine or Doctor of Dental Surgery

A dentist, also known as a 'dental surgeon', is a health care practitioner that specializes in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases and conditions of the oral cavity. The dentist's supporting team aides in providing oral health services. The dental team includes dental assistants, dental hygienists, dental technicians, and in some states, dental therapists.

Training

All dentists in the U.S. must graduate from high school and complete required courses such as general biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, and statistics/calculus. While most dental schools require at least a bachelors degree, a few schools may consider admitting exceptional students after only 3 years of college. To apply, students must take the Dental Admissions Test. Admission to dental school is competitive, and is generally determined based on factors such as GPA, DAT scores, recommendation letters, and extracurricular activities. To become a licensed dentist, one must then complete an accredited dental school curriculum and successfully master all clinical competencies and national board exams. Most dental school curricula require four years of training, however, some states require dentists to complete a post graduate residency program as well. In the U.S., a newly graduated dentist is then awarded the DDS, Doctor of Dental Surgery, degree or the DMD, Doctor of Dental Medicine, degree depending on the dental school attended. The degrees are equivalent. A newly graduated dentist can then pursue further specialty residency training ranging from 2 to 6 years. Additionally, dentists participate in continuing education where they attend lectures to learn of recent developments, practice new methods, and earn continuing education hours. There are specific requirements for dentists to attend continuing education hours, and dentists who accumulate additional training are better prepared to handle a variety of cases and surprises during treatment. In the UK the training is similar except it is generally a five year undergraduate course leading to a BDS (Bachelor of Dental Surgery).

Responsibilities

By nature of their general training, a licensed dentist can carry out most dental treatments such as restorative (dental restorations, crowns, bridges), orthodontics (braces), prosthetic (dentures), endodontic (root canal) therapy, periodontal (gum) therapy, and exodontia (extraction of teeth), as well as performing examinations, taking radiographs (x-rays) and diagnosis. Additionally, dentists are allowed to engage in oral surgery when performing invasive procedures such as dental implant placement.[1] Dentists can also prescribe medications such as antibiotics, fluorides, pain killers, local anesthetics, sedatives/hypnotics and any other medication that serve in the treatment of the various conditions that arise in the head and neck.

Dentists need to take additional qualifications or training to carry out more complex procedures such as General anesthesia, oral and maxillofacial surgery, and implants. While many oral diseases are unique and self-limiting, poor conditions in the oral cavity can lead to poor general health and vice versa. Conditions in the oral cavity may be indicative of systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, diabetes, AIDS, different blood diseases(including malignancies) etc.

Specialties

Main article: Specialty (dentistry)

Official specialties

  • Dental public health - The study of dental epidemiology and social health policies.
  • Endodontics - Root canal therapy and study of diseases of the dental pulp.
  • Oral and maxillofacial pathology - The study, diagnosis, and sometimes the treatment of oral and maxillofacial related diseases.
  • Oral and maxillofacial radiology - The study and radiologic interpretation of oral and maxillofacial diseases.
  • Oral and maxillofacial surgery - Extractions, implants, and MaxilloFacial surgery which also includes correction of congenital facial deformities.
  • Orthodontics and dentofacial orthopaedics - The straightening of teeth and modification of midface and mandibular growth.
  • Periodontology (periodontics) - Study and treatment of diseases of the gums (non-surgical and surgical) as well as placement and maintenance of dental implants
  • Pediatric dentistry (formerly pedodontics) - Dentistry for children
  • Prosthodontics - Dentures, bridges and the restoration of implants. Some prosthodontists further their training in "oral and maxillofacial prosthodontics", which is the discipline concerned with the replacement of missing facial structures, such as ears, eyes, noses, etc.

Specialists in these fields are designated "registrable" (in the United States, "board eligible") and warrant exclusive titles such as orthodontist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, endodontist, pediatric dentist, periodontist, or prosthodontist upon satisfying certain local accreditation requirements (U.S., "Board Certified").

See also

  • Dentistry portal

References

ru:Стоматолог
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