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Dwyfor Meirionnydd (Assembly constituency)

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Dwyfor Meirionnydd (Assembly constituency)

Coordinates: 52°50′56″N 3°58′59″W / 52.849°N 3.983°W / 52.849; -3.983

Template:Welsh Assembly constituency infobox Dwyfor Meirionnydd is a constituency of the National Assembly for Wales, created for the 2007 Assembly election. It elects one Assembly Member by the first past the post method of election. Also, however, it is one of eight constituencies in the Mid and West Wales electoral region, which elects four additional members, in addition to nine constituency members, to produce a degree of proportional representation for the region as a whole.

Boundaries

The constituency shares the boundaries of the Dwyfor Meirionnydd Westminster constituency, which will come into use for the 2010 United Kingdom general election, created by merging into one constituency areas which were previously within the Caernarfon and Meirionnydd Nant Conwy constituencies.

Caernarfon is a Gwynedd constituency, entirely within the preserved county of Gwynedd, and one of nine constituencies in the North Wales region. Meirionnydd Nant Conwy was partly a Gwynedd constituency and partly a Clwyd constituency, partly within the preserved county of Gwynedd and partly within the preserved county of Clwyd, and one of eight constituencies in the Mid and West Wales electoral region.

Dwyfor Meirionnydd is a Gwynedd constituency, one of three constituencies entirely within the preserved county of Gwynedd, and one of eight constituencies in the Mid and West Wales electoral region. The other Gwynedd constituencies, however, Arfon and Ynys Môn, are within the North Wales electoral region.

The Mid and West Wales region consists of the constituencies of Brecon and Radnorshire, Carmarthen East and Dinefwr, Carmarthen West and South Pembrokeshire, Ceredigion, Dwyfor Meirionnydd, Llanelli, Montgomeryshire and Preseli Pembrokeshire.

Voting

In general elections for the National Assembly for Wales, each voter has two votes. The first vote may be used to vote for a candidate to become the Assembly Member for the voter's constituency, elected by the first past the post system. The second vote may be used to vote for a regional closed party list of candidates. Additional member seats are allocated from the lists by the d'Hondt method, with constituency results being taken into account in the allocation.

Assembly Members

The seat has been represented since its creation in 2007 by Dafydd Elis-Thomas of Plaid Cymru, the Assembly's former Presiding Officer. He previously represented the former constituency of Meirionnydd Nant Conwy from 1999 to 2007, and was the Westminster MP for the area from 1974 to 1992.

Period Member Party
2007 to present Dafydd Elis-Thomas Plaid Cymru

Elections

Welsh Assembly Election 2011: Dwyfor Meirionnydd
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Plaid Cymru Dafydd Elis-Thomas 9,656 46.6 −13.1
Conservative Simon Baynes 4,239 20.4 +0.8
Llais Gwynedd Louise Hughes 3,225 15.5 N/A
style="background-color: Template:Welsh Labour Party/meta/color; width: 5px;" | Martyn Stuart Singleton 2,623 12.6 +0.2
Liberal Democrats Stephen William Churchman 1,000 4.8 −3.5
Majority 5,417 26.1 −14.0
Turnout 20,743 46.3 −1.1
Plaid Cymru hold Swing −7.0
Welsh Assembly Election 2007: Dwyfor Meirionnydd
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Plaid Cymru Dafydd Elis-Thomas 13,201 59.7 +2.3
Conservative Mike Wood 4,333 19.6 +5.5
style="background-color: Template:Welsh Labour Party/meta/color; width: 5px;" | David Mervyn Phillips 2,749 12.4 −9.1
Liberal Democrats Stephen William Churchman 1,839 8.3 +1.3
Majority 8,868 40.1
Turnout 22,122 47.4 +3.4
Plaid Cymru win (new seat)

References

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