World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Fidelity

Article Id: WHEBN0000605103
Reproduction Date:

Title: Fidelity  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Translation, Vinyl disc records preservation, Honour, Fidelity (art and symbolism), Freeze frame television
Collection: Ethical Principles, Sexual Fidelity
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Fidelity

Palazzo Ducale in Venice: in the porch, featuring Virtues and vices - In fidelitate nulli gero (Fidelity)

Fidelity is the quality of being faithful or loyal. Its original meaning regarded duty in a broader sense than the related concept of fealty. Both derive from the Latin word fidēlis, meaning "faithful or loyal". In the City of London financial markets it has traditionally been used in the sense encompassed in the motto "My word is my bond".

Contents

  • Audio 1
  • Scientific modelling and simulation 2
  • Program evaluation 3
  • References 4

Audio

Fidelity also denotes how accurately a copy reproduces its source. For example, a worn gramophone record will have a lower fidelity than one in good condition, and a recording made by a low budget record company in the early 20th century is likely to have significantly less audio fidelity than a good modern recording. In the 1950s, the terms "high fidelity" or "hi-fi" were popularized for equipment and recordings which exhibited more accurate sound reproduction. The converse term "lo-fi", does not necessarily mean "low fidelity", rather that the production ethic aims for "gritty authenticity" over perfect production. Similarly in electronics, fidelity refers to the correspondence of the output signal to the input signal, rather than sound quality, as in the popular internet connection technology "Wi-Fi".

Scientific modelling and simulation

In the fields of scientific modelling and simulation, fidelity refers to the degree to which a model or simulation reproduces the state and behaviour of a real world object, feature or condition. Fidelity is therefore a measure of the realism of a model or simulation.[1] Simulation fidelity has also been described in the past as "degree of similarity".[2]

Program evaluation

In the field of program evaluation, the term fidelity denotes how closely a set of procedures were implemented as they were supposed to have been. For example, it is difficult to draw conclusions from a study about formative assessment in school classrooms if the teachers are not able or willing to follow the procedures they received in training.[3]

References

  1. ^ "SISO-REF-002-1999: Fidelity Implementation Study Group Report". Simulation Interoperability Standards Organization. 1999. Retrieved January 2, 2015. 
  2. ^ Hays, R. T.; Singer, M. J. (1989). Simulation fidelity in training system design: Bridging the gap between reality and training. Springer-Verlag. 
  3. ^ O'Donnell, Carol L. (2008). "Defining, Conceptualizing, and Measuring Fidelity of Implementation and Its Relationship to Outcomes in K–12 Curriculum Intervention Research". Review of Educational Research 78 (1): 33–84.  
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.