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Foreign relations of Slovakia

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Title: Foreign relations of Slovakia  
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Subject: Russia–Slovakia relations, Slovakia–United Kingdom relations, Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Slovakia), Serbia–Slovakia relations, Bulgaria–Slovakia relations
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Foreign relations of Slovakia

This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Slovakia

Slovak Republic has been a member of European Union since 2004. Slovakia has been an active participant in U.S.- and NATO-led military actions. There is a joint Czech-Slovak peacekeeping force in Kosovo. After the September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attack on the United States, the government opened its airspace to coalition planes. In June 2002, Slovakia announced that they would send an engineering brigade to Afghanistan.

OECD. It also is part of the Visegrad Four (Slovakia, Hungary, Czech Republic, and Poland), a forum for discussing areas of common concern. Slovak Republic and the Czech Republic entered into a Customs Union upon the division of Czechoslovakia in 1993, which facilitates a relatively free flow of goods and services. Slovak Republic maintains diplomatic relations with 134 countries, primarily through its Ministry of Foreign Affairs. There are 44 embassies and 35 honorary consulates in Bratislava.

Contents

  • International disputes 1
    • Liechtenstein 1.1
    • Hungary 1.2
  • Illicit drug trafficking 2
  • Europe 3
  • Rest of world 4
    • Armenia 4.1
    • Australia 4.2
    • Canada 4.3
    • Colombia 4.4
    • India 4.5
    • Israel 4.6
    • Pakistan 4.7
    • United States 4.8
  • See also 5
  • References 6

International disputes

Liechtenstein

Liechtenstein claims restitution of land in Slovakia confiscated from its princely family in 1918[1] by the then newly established state of Czechoslovakia, the predecessor of the Slovak Republic. The Slovak Republic insists that the power to claim restitution does not go back before February 1948, when the Communists seized power. Slovakia and Liechtenstein established diplomatic relations on 9 December 2009.[2]

Hungary

Bilateral government, legal, technical and economic working group negotiations continued in 2006 between Slovakia and Hungary over Hungary's completion of its portion of the Gabcikovo-Nagymaros hydroelectric dam project along the Danube.[3]

Illicit drug trafficking

Transshipment point for Southwest Asian heroin bound for Western Europe, producer of synthetic drugs for regional market.[3]

Europe

Country Formal Relations Began Notes
 Albania See Foreign relations of Albania and Albania-Slovakia relations The multi-national Communist armed forces’ sole joint action was the Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia in August 1968. All member countries, with the exception of the People's Republic of Albania and the Socialist Republic of Romania participated in the invasion. Albania formally withdrew form the Warsaw Pact in 1968 over the matter.[4]
  • Albania has an embassy in Bratislava.
  • Czech Republic has an embassy in Tirana.
 Austria See Foreign relations of Austria
  • Austria has an embassy in Bratislava.[5]
  • Slovakia has an embassy in Vienna and 3 honorary consulates (in Innsbruck, Linz and Salzburg).[6]
  • Both countries share 91 km of common borders.
  • There are around 25,000 people of Slovak descent living in Austria.
  • Austria Ministry of Foreign Affairs: list of bilateral treaties with Slovakia (in German only)
 Belarus See Foreign relations of Belarus
 Bulgaria 1993-01-01
  • Both countries had diplomatic relations for the first time between 1939 and 1945.
  • Bulgaria recognized Slovakia on December 23, 1992.
  • Since February 1994, Bulgaria has embassy in Bratislava.[7]
  • Since June 1994, Slovakia has embassy in Sofia.[8]
  • Both countries are full members of the NATO and of the European Union.
 Croatia See Foreign relations of Croatia
 Cyprus
  • Cyprus is represented in Slovakia through its embassy in Vienna (Austria).
  • Slovak Republic has an embassy in Nicosia and an honorary consulate in Limassol.[9]
  • Both countries are full members of the European Union.
  • Cyprus Ministry of Foreign Affairs: list of bilateral treatis with Slovakia
 Czech Republic See Czech Republic – Slovakia relations Between 1918 and January 1, 1993, both countries were part of Czechoslovakia. Both countries established diplomatic relations on January 1, 1993. The Czech Republic has an embassy in Bratislava. Slovak Republic has an embassy in Prague and a consulate general in Brno.
 Denmark 1993 See Denmark – Slovakia relations
 Estonia See Foreign relations of Estonia
 Finland See Foreign relations of Finland
 France See Foreign relations of France
 Germany 1993 See German-Slovak relations Both countries established diplomatic relations in 1993 but previously had relations during World War II when Slovakia was a separate state. Germany has an embassy in Bratislava. Slovakia has an embassy in Berlin, an embassy branch in Bonn, a general consulate in Munich. Germany plays an important part in the Slovak economy as it is Slovakia's main trading partner.
 Greece 1993-01-01
  • Greece opened its embassy in Bratislava in September 1996.[12]
  • Slovakia also has an embassy in Athens.
  • Both countries are full members of NATO and the European Union.
  • Greek Foreign Affairs Ministry about relations with Slovakia
  • Slovak Foreign Affairs Ministry about relations with Greece
 Hungary 1993 See Hungary–Slovakia relations
 Ireland See Foreign relations of the Republic of Ireland
 Latvia
  • Both countries established direct diplomatic relations on January 1, 1993. Latvia is represented in Slovakia through its embassy in Vienna (Austria). Slovakia has an embassy in Riga. Both countries are full members of NATO and of the European Union. Latvian Foreign Minister Indulis Berzins and his Slovak counterpart Eduard Kukan met in Riga in 2000.[15]
 Malta See Malta–Slovakia relations Malta is represented in Slovakia through a non resident ambassador based in Valletta (in the Foreign Ministry). Slovakia is represented in Malta through its embassy in Rome (Italy) and an honorary consulate in Valletta.
 Netherlands 1993-01-01 See Foreign relations of the Netherlands
  • The Netherlands have an embassy in Bratislava.[16]
  • Slovakia has an embassy in The Hague.
  • Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs about the relation with Slovakia (in Dutch only)
 Poland 1993 See Poland–Slovakia relations
  • Poland has an embassy in Bratislava.[17]
  • Slovakia has an embassy in Warsaw and a general consulate in Kraków.[18]
  • Both countries are full members of NATO and of the European Union.
  • Both countries share 539 km of common borders.[19]
 Romania 1993-01-01 See Romania–Slovakia relations
  • Romania has embassy in Bratislava.[20]
  • Slovakia has an embassy in Bucharest and an honorary consulate in Salonta.[21]
  • Both members are full members of: NATO and European Union
  • Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs about relations with Slovakia
 Russia 1993-01-01 See Russia–Slovakia relations
  • Russia opened its embassy in Bratislava in 1993.
  • Slovakia has an embassy in Moscow.
  • http://www.rusemb.sk/
 Serbia 1993 See Serbia–Slovakia relations
  • Serbia has an embassy in Bratislava.[22]
  • Slovakia has an embassy in Belgrade.[23]
  • Serbian Ministry of Foreign affairs about the relation with Slovakia
 Ukraine 1993-01-01 See Slovakia–Ukraine relations
 United Kingdom 1993 See Foreign relations of Slovakia
  • The United Kingdom has an embassy in Bratislava.[27]
  • Slovakia has an embassy in London.[28]
  • Both countries are full members of NATO and of the European Union.
  • British Foreign and Commonwealth Office about the relation with Slovakia

Rest of world

Armenia

  • Formal relations were started in 1994
  • Armenia is represented in Slovakia through its embassy in Vienna (Austria).
  • Slovakia is represented in Armenia through a non resident ambassador based in Bratislava (in the Foreign Ministry).
  • Both countries are full members of the Council of Europe.
  • Between February 24 and February 28, 2008, Slovak Foreign Minister Ján Kubiš, made an official visit to Armenia.[29]

Australia

  • Formal relations were started in 1993-01-01.
  • Australia is represented in Slovakia through its embassy in Vienna (Austria).[30]
  • Slovakia has an embassy in Canberra and 2 honorary consulates (in Brisbane and Elsternwick).[31]
  • There are around 8,500 people of Slovak descent living in Australia.
  • Australian Department of Foreign affairs and Trade about the relation with Slovakia

Canada

Colombia

  • Formal relations were started in 1993-01-01.
  • Colombia is represented in Slovakia through its embassy in Vienna (Austria).[32]
  • Slovakia is represented in Colombia through its embassy in Brasilia (Brazil).
  • Slovakia backed-up Colombia's entry into the OECD and was a key player in the ratification of the Colombia-European Union Free Trade Agreement.[32]

India

Since August 1995 India has an embassy in Bratislava and Slovakia has an embassy in New Delhi.[33] The Slovak Government welcomed and appreciated the opening of the Embassy of India, Bratislava (one of 32 resident missions) in August 1995, which was agreed during the former PM Moravcik's visit to India and considered it as a further indication of India's interest in enhancing relations with Slovakia.[34]

Israel

Both countries established diplomatic relations in 1993. Israel has an embassy in Bratislava.[35] Slovakia has an embassy in Tel Aviv.[36] See also History of the Jews in Slovakia.

Pakistan

United States

  • Formal relations were started in 1993-01-01
  • The U.S. maintains an embassy in Bratislava, Slovak Republic.

See also

References

  1. ^ Citizenship East & WestAndré Liebich, Daniel M. Warner, Jasna Dragovic (ed.): ; .Post-Communist Restitution and the Rule of LawCsongor Kuti:
  2. ^ , 9 December 2009.Liechtenstein and the Slovak Republic establish diplomatic relationsAmt für Auswärtige Angelegenheiten (ed.):
  3. ^ a b "Slovak Republic". The World Factbook.  
  4. ^ "1955: Communist states sign Warsaw Pact". BBC News. 14 May 1955. Retrieved 27 May 2010. 
  5. ^ Austrian embassy in Bratislava (in German and Slovak only)
  6. ^ Slovak embassy in Vienna
  7. ^ Bulgarian embassy in Bratislava
  8. ^ Slovakia has an embassy in Sofia
  9. ^ Slovak embassy in Nicosia
  10. ^ Danish embassy in Bratislava
  11. ^ Slovak embassy in Copenhagen
  12. ^ Greek embassy in Bratislava
  13. ^ Hungarian embassy in Bratislava (in Hungarian and Slovak only)
  14. ^ Slovak embassy Budapest
  15. ^ "Latvian, Slovak foreign ministers praise ties, discuss EU, NATO integration".  
  16. ^ Dutch embassy in Bratislava
  17. ^ Polish embassy in Bratislava
  18. ^ Slovak embassy in Warsaw (in Polish and Slovak only)
  19. ^ (Polish) Informacje o Polsce - informacje ogólne. Page gives Polish PWN Encyklopedia as reference.
  20. ^ embassy in Bratislava
  21. ^ Slovak embassy in Bucharest
  22. ^ Serbian embassy in Bratislava (in Serbian and Slovak only)
  23. ^ Slovak embassy in Belgrade
  24. ^ Slovak embassy in Kiev
  25. ^ Ukrainian embassy in Bratislava
  26. ^ Serhy Yekelchyk "Ukraine: Birth of a Modern Nation", Oxford University Press (2007), ISBN 978-0-19-530546-3 (page 128-130)
  27. ^ British embassy in Bratislava
  28. ^ Slovak embassy in London
  29. ^
    • Slovakia recognises the Armenian genocide.
    Slovak Ministry of Foreign Affairs about Ján Kubiš’s visit to Armenia
  30. ^ Australian embassy in Vienna (also accredited to Slovakia)
  31. ^ Slovak embassy in Canberra
  32. ^ a b http://www.cancilleria.gov.co/international/regions/europe/union/member/slovakia
  33. ^ [1]
  34. ^ http://www.indianembassy.sk/uk_02_01.html
  35. ^ Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs: direction of the Israeli embassy in Bratislava
  36. ^ Slovak embassy in Tel Aviv
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