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Free Press (publisher)

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Free Press (publisher)

Free Press
Parent company Simon & Schuster
Status Active
Founded 1947
Founder Jeremiah Kaplan and Charles Liebman
Country of origin United States
Headquarters location New York
Key people Martha K. Levin, publisher
Official website /free-press.biz.simonandschusterimprints

Free Press was a book publishing imprint of Simon & Schuster. It was one of the best-known imprints specializing in serious nonfiction. In 2012, it ceased to exist as a distinct imprint entity and merged into Simon & Schuster, the company's flagship imprint; however, some books would still be published using the Free Press imprimatur.[1][2]

History

Free Press was founded by Max Weber and The Scientific Outlook by Bertrand Russell.[1] It was headquartered in Glencoe, Illinois, where it was known as The Free Press of Glencoe. In 1960, Kaplan was recruited by Macmillan to provide new editorial leadership and he agreed to move to New York if Macmillan Publishing Company would buy Free Press, and thus Free Press was sold in 1960 for $1.3 million ($500,000 going to Kaplan and $800,000 going to Liebman).[1] In 1994, Simon & Schuster acquired Macmillan and Free Press.[1] In 2012, it was announced that Free Press would cease to exist as a distinct entity and would be merged into Simon & Schuster, the company's flagship imprint.[1][2] "We plan to continue publishing thought leaders and other important cultural voices under the Free Press imprimatur, while also introducing many other Free Press authors, such as novelists and historians and business writers, to the flagship Simon & Schuster imprint."[1]

During the 1960s and 1970s Free Press was under the direction of a variety of publishers including George McCune, Valery Webb, Ed Barry and Robert Wallace.[1] Under Barry's leadership in 1974, Ernest Becker's The Denial of Death won the Pulitzer Prize.[1] In 1983, Edwin Glikes, a well-known political neoconservative, took over leadership.[1] This began an era of controversial[1] conservative books including The Tempting of America by Robert Bork, Intercourse by Andrea Dworkin and The Closing of the American Mind by Alan Bloom.[1] Glikes was succeeded by Adam Bellow, who also published neoconservative books including Illiberal Education by Dinesh D'Souza, The Real Anita Hill by David Brock, and The Bell Curve by Charles Murray and Richard Herrnstein.[1] In 1994, Simon & Schuster acquired Macmillan and Free Press was led by publishers Michael Jacobs, Paula Barker Duffy, and William Shinker for short stints.[1]

Free Press was led by publisher Martha Levin from 2001 until 2012, when it ceased to exist as a distinct entity and merged into Simon & Schuster's flagship imprint.[1][3] In 2003, two of the five finalists for the 2003 National Book Award in the non-fiction category were Free Press titles, including the winner, Waiting for Snow in Havana by Carlos Eire.[4] In 2008, Free Press published The White Tiger, Indian author Aravind Adiga's debut novel, which won the Man Booker Prize.[5]

Notable books

  • Becker, Howard S. (1963). Outsiders: Studies in the Sociology of Deviance. New York: Free Press.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o
  2. ^ a b
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^

External links

  • Free Press homepage at Simon & Schuster
  • Divisions and Imprints at Simon & Schuster
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