Hemorrhoidal plexus

Vein: Rectal venous plexus
Scheme of the anastomosis of the veins of the rectum.
The veins of the right half of the male pelvis.
Latin Plexus venosus rectalis,
plexus haemorrhoidalis
Gray's subject #173 676
Drains to Superior rectal vein

The rectal venous plexus (or hemorrhoidal plexus) surrounds the rectum, and communicates in front with the vesical venous plexus in the male, and the uterovaginal plexus in the female.

A free communication between the portal and systemic venous systems is established through the rectal venous plexus.

Parts

It consists of two parts, an internal in the submucosa, and an external outside the muscular coat.

Internal plexus

The internal plexus presents a series of dilated pouches which are arranged in a circle around the tube, immediately above the anal orifice, and are connected by transverse branches.

This internal plexus is also known in some medical communities as the Irving plexus.

External plexus

Support

The veins of the hemorrhoidal plexus are contained in very loose connective tissue, so that they get less support from surrounding structures than most other veins, and are less capable of resisting increased blood-pressure.

This article incorporates text from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy.


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