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Henry C. Wayne

Henry Constantine Wayne
Henry C. Wayne, Confederate Brigadier General, Adjutant and Inspector-General in the Confederate Service
Born (1815-09-18)September 18, 1815
Savannah, Georgia
Died March 15, 1883(1883-03-15) (aged 67)
Savannah, Georgia
Allegiance United States of America
Confederate States of America
Service/branch  United States Army
 Confederate States Army
Years of service 1838-1860 (USA)
1861-1865 (CSA)
Rank Brevet Major (USA)
Brigadier General (CSA)
Adjutant and Inspector-General (CSA)
Battles/wars

Aroostook War
Mexican-American War

American Civil War

Henry Constantine Wayne (September 18, 1815 – March 15, 1883) was an brigadier general during the American Civil War.

Contents

  • Early life and career 1
  • U.S. Camel Corps 2
  • Civil War service 3
  • Awards and books 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • Bibliography 7

Early life and career

Henry Wayne was the son of U.S. Supreme Court Justice James Moore Wayne. He graduated from West Point in 1838 and joined the artillery as a second lieutenant.[1] Later in that year Wayne participated in the Aroostook War over the boundary of Maine.[2] In 1841, he became the assistant instructor of artillery and cavalry at West Point where he remained for two years.[1] Henry became a first lieutenant in 1842.[3] When the United States declared war on Mexico, Wayne joined the troops to fight. He was brevetted a major for his bravery at the Battles of Contreras and Churubusco.[3]

U.S. Camel Corps

After the

  • Thomas Cushing's Memorials of the Class of 1834 of Harvard College: Prepared for the Fiftieth Anniversary of Their Graduation (1884) pgs. 108-09
  • John Fiske's Appletons' Cyclopædia of American Biography (1889) pg. 400
  • Ezra J. Warner's Generals in Gray: Lives of the Confederate Commanders (1959) pg. 329
  • John Walker Guss's Savannah's Laurel Grove Cemetery (2004) pg. 58
  • Byron Farwell's The Encyclopedia of Nineteenth-century Land Warfare: An Illustrated World View (2001) pg. 154
  • Thomas William Herringshaw's Herringshaw's National Library of American Biography (1914) pg. 620

Bibliography

  1. ^ a b Thomas Cushing's Memorials of the Class of 1834 of Harvard College: Prepared for the Fiftieth Anniversary of Their Graduation (1884) pgs. 108-09
  2. ^ a b John Fiske's Appletons' Cyclopædia of American Biography (1889) pg. 400
  3. ^ a b c d e Ezra J. Warner's Generals in Gray: Lives of the Confederate Commanders (1959) pg. 329
  4. ^ a b c John Walker Guss's Savannah's Laurel Grove Cemetery (2004) pg. 58
  5. ^ a b c Byron Farwell's The Encyclopedia of Nineteenth-century Land Warfare: An Illustrated World View (2001) pg. 154
  6. ^ 3rd Georgia equipment - Picture of Brogans (shoes)
  7. ^ Thomas Conn Bryan (1 September 2009). Confederate Georgia. University of Georgia Press. p. 28.  
  8. ^ Thompson, Sr., Scott B. "THE BATTLE OF BALLS FERRY, GEORGIA". Retrieved 8 February 2014. 
  9. ^ Thomas William Herringshaw's Herringshaw's National Library of American Biography (1914) pg. 620

References

See also

Wayne received the First Class Gold Medal of Mammal Division by the Société impériale zoologique d'acclimatation of France in 1858 for his introduction of the camel into the United States.[9] In 1856 he wrote The Sword Exercise, arranged for Military Instruction.[2]

Awards and books

Wayne resigned his commission after receiving the results of Chattahoochee River. After being ordered to Manassas, Virginia, Wayne resigned his commission as a brigadier general and he instead just stuck to his duties as adjutant and inspector-general until the end of the war. Although, he did briefly see action during the Savannah Campaign (Sherman's March to the Sea). He commanded Confederate troops at the Battle of Ball's Ferry November 23–26, 1864. In this action, he was unsuccessful in stopping Union forces from crossing the Oconee River in Wilkinson County, GA.[3][8]

Civil War service

[4] The experiments were also ended with the start of the Civil War, and the remaining camels were either sold or released into the wild.[5] quickly ended the debate .Civil War, proposed a bill to buy 1,000 more camels, but the start of the Department of War When the group arrived back, they experimented with the animals in the deserts of the western United States. Forty-one more camels would arrive later to join the corps. Congress, on the request of the [5], nine in Egypt, and twenty-one in Turkey.Tunisia to see his 250 camels that were said to be able to do the work of 1000 horses. They then purchased thirty-three camels: three in Grand Duke Leopold II to examine camels in zoos. They then journeyed to Italy and met USS Supply The group sailed to London on the [5] pass a bill to experiment with the camels. Wayne was chosen to lead an expedition to the Middle East to purchase $30,000 worth of camels.Congress on 1853, he had Secretary of War, and when Davis became Jefferson Davis Wayne relayed this idea to Senator [4] for transportation of people and supplies in the West.camels Crossman brought up his idea of using [4]

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